Please login to access all features of this site
  User Name Password  
7jetset7 Logo 7jetset7 Logo  

7jetset7 Home7jetset7 World Map7jetset7 Airlines7jetset7 Help7jetset7 Account7jetset7 SubscribeFree Content ViewAbout 7jetset77jetset7 FeedbackContact 7jetset7

7jetset7 Blog

    
Airlines

printable version
Name: MALAWIAN AIRLINES
7JetSet7 Code: AML
Status: Operational
Region: AFRICA
City: BLANTYRE
Country: MALAWI
Employees 500
Web: airmalawi.com
Email: enquiries@airmalawi.net
Telephone: +265 1 620 811
Fax: +265 1 620 042
Sita: BLZCDQM
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
AML-2009-02-A
AML-2009-02-B
AML-2009-02-C
AML-2009-02-D
AML-CABIN ATTENDANTS 2006-03
AML-INTRO-2006-03
AML-LOGO 2006-03-A
AML-LOGO-2014-03
AML-MAINTENANCE MRO
AML-MAP-EAST AFRICA
AML-MAP-FEB09

FORMED IN 1967. NATIONAL AIRLINE. FORMERLY AIR MALAWI AND EARLIER, CENTRAL AFRICAN AIRWAYS. DOMESTIC & REGIONAL, SCHEDULED AND CHARTER, PASSENGER & CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

Address:
4 Robins Road
PO Box 84
Blantyre, Malawi

Malawi (Republic of Malawi) was established in 1964, it covers an area of 118,484 sq km, its population is 12 million, its capital city is Lilongwe, and its official languages are English and Chichewa.

APRIL 1995: TO LILONGWE, MANGOCHI, MZUZU, BEIRA, HARARE, DAR-ES-SALAAM, LUSAKA, JOHANNESBURG, MFUWE, AND NAIROBI.

MAIN BASE/HUBS: BLANTYRE CHILEKA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (BLZ).

584 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 45 FLIGHT CREW (FC), & 19 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

PLANNING INTERNATIONAL OPERATIONS WITH 1 747 LEASED.

1994 = +10.7% (RPK) PASSENGER TRAFFIC, +10.7% PASSENGERS (PAX), +13.2% (FTK) FREIGHT TRAFFIC. OPERATING PROFIT = +$8.8 MILLION (+$12.1 MILLION): 45.1% LF LOAD FACTOR.

JUNE 1997: PLANS TO PRIVATIZE WITHIN NEXT TWO YEARS.

JOINT SERVICE WITH (LAM) AIRLINES, BLANTYRE - JOHANNESBURG - MAPUTO - BLANTYRE. RESUMED LILONGWE - MZUZU - KARONGA (CARAVAN).

1 737-222, (AOZ) 4 MONTH LEASED. THEN WILL LEASE AIR HOLLAND (HOL) 737-300.

SEPTEMBER 1997: 1 737-3L9 (23718) LEASED TIL MAY 1998. STOPPED OPERATING DORNIER 228 FOR ECONOMIC REASONS. REPLACED WITH CESSNA CARAVAN LEASED FROM KING AIR SERVICES, SOUTH AFRICA.

APRIL 1998: 529 EMPLOYEES.

CODE SHARE WITH AIR ZIMBABWE (ZMB), HARARE/LONDON GATWICK, VIA LILONGWE, MALAWI, (767-200ER).

1 CESSNA 208B (PT6A-114A) DELIVERY.

JUNE 1998: EXTENDS LEASE FOR +6 MONTHS ON 737-33A (PH-OVA), EX-AIR HOLLAND (HOL).

AUGUST 1998: 1 CESSNA 208B GRAND CARAVAN (0682) DELIVERY.

APRIL 1999: 503 EMPLOYEES. SITA: BLZCZQM.

(http://www.africaonline.co.ke/airmalawi). (airmalawi@co.wn.apc.org).

MARCH 2000: 1 DORNIER 228-212 (8222) SOLD TO GUARDA COSTEIRA DE CABO VERDE (TCV).

APRIL 2000: AIR MALAWI (AML) IS IN SERIOUS FINANCIAL DIFFICULTIES.

503 EMPLOYEES. HUB AT LILONGWE.

OCTOBER 2000: CREATES 2 SUBSIDIARIES: LILONGWE HANDLING CO, AND AIR CARGO LTD.

FEBRUARY 2001: CODE SHARE WITH KENYA AIRWAYS (KEN), LILONGWE TO NAIROBI.

SEPTEMBER 2001: 1 737-2H7C (20590, 3D-ZZM), INTER AIR (ITI) WET-LEASED.

MARCH 2002: LAYS OFF 110 EMPLOYEES.

APRIL 2002: OWNERS: MALAWI GOVERNMENT (100%).

MAIN BASE: BLANTYRE CHILEKA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (BLZ).

HUB: LILONGWE AIRPORT (LLW).

July 2002: 2001 = 241 million (RPK) traffic; 49.1% LF load factor; 118,000 passengers (PAX); 500 employees.

January 2003: Mercator, the Information Technology (IT) division of the Emirates Group (EAD), provides its fastrac revenue accounting solution to Air Malawi (AML).

February 2003: South African Airways (SAA) and Crown Aviation have won the bid to purchase between 60% and 70% of Air Malawi (AML).

September 2004: Let L410 bought from the Czech Republic, replacing a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan that was written off (W/O) in December 2003. Plans to acquire a 737-300 or 737-500 early in 2005.

October 2004: Resumed flights to Club Makokola in Mangochi and Nampula in Mozambique (L-410). Air Zimbabwe (ZMB) resumed Harare - Lubumbashi (in cooperation with Air Malawi (AML).

January 2005: Work has started on renovating the airport terminal building, extending the apron and relaying the runway at Malawi's Kamuzu International Airport. Government had looked at developing facilities at Chiileka Airport as an alternative gateway to the country, but it was deemed to be too expensive to bring that airport up to international standards.

March 2005: Heavy maintenance contract including fleet integration services to Hamilton Aerospace Technologies, a wholly owned subsidiary of Global Aircraft Solutions, for a new 737-522 that Air Malawi (AML) is adding to its fleet.

June 2005: Code share with Kenya Airways (KEN), Blantyre - Nairobi (6/week). Code share with Precision Air (PRT), Blantyre & Dar es Salaam - Dubai. Blantyre - Harare (5/week).

September 2005: 737-522 (25384), ex-United Airlines (UAL), bought from Q Aviation, Texas. To be used on routes from Blantyre to Nairobi, Dar-es-Salaam, & Dubai, replacing a leased 737-200.

December 2005: Air Malawi (AML) announced it plans on taking delivery of a 737-522 this month, the airline's second.

January 2006: Emirates SkyCargo (EMC) launches freighter service from Dubai to Lilongwe, Malawi, on January 13. The service will be operated jointly with Air Cargo Ltd, a subsidiary of Air Malawi (AML), using a newly converted Emirates SkyCargo (EMC) A310F.

Air Malawi (AML) added a Boeing 737-500 to its fleet.

March 2006: 737-33A (25056, 7Q-YKP) & 737-522 (25384, 7Q-YKW) available for wet-lease.

Contact:
Planning Department
(planning@airmalawi.net). (Changwa-t@airmalawi.net)

April 2006: Air Malawi (AML) as the national airline of Malawi, operates a small, domestic and regional, passenger network.

Employees: 500.

(IATA) Code: QM - 167. (ICAO) Code: AML - (Callsign - MALAWI).

Parent organization/shareholders: Malawi government (100%).

Company slogan: "Africa's friendly airline."

(http://www.airmalawi.net). (enquiries@airmalawi.net).

Main Base: Blantyre Chileka International airport (BLZ).

Hub: Lilongwe airport (LLW).

Domestic, Scheduled Destinations: Blantyre; Club Makokola; Lilongwe; & Mzuzu.

International, Scheduled Destinations: Dar es Salaam; Dubai; Harare; Johannesburg; Lusaka; Nairobi; & Nampula.

Air Malawi (AML) suspended its service from Lilongwe to Dubai. The airline operated 2 flights a week.

July 2006: Air Zimbabwe (ZMB) signed code share agreements with Air Tanzania (TNZ) and Air Malawi (AML).

December 2006: Air Zimbabwe (ZMB) is changing the routing of its Harare to London flights to stop in Lilongwe (Malawi) and Lusaka (Zambia) as a result of a code-sharing agreement it signed with Air Malawi (AML) and Zambia Skyways. The operation began this month with the Lilongwe routing operating once a week, and the Lusaka routing twice a week, all with 767s.

This code share agreement is seen as an attempt to resurrect the defunct Central African Airways. However, this time around, it does not involve Zambian Airways (MBA). Many years ago, Central African Airways was the tripartite arrangement with Air Zimbabwe (ZMB) known then as "Air Rhodesia" with Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) with 50%, Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) with 35%, and Nyasaland (now Malawi) with 15%.

September 2008: Comair (CML) may finally get a chance to expand beyond its home borders. It now has a deal to buy 49% of Air Malawi (AML), a carrier it’s tried to buy in the past. (CML) also secured options to buy a majority stake in the future. (AML) serves just seven routes from one of the world’s poorest countries.

September 2009: 737-219 (23474, ZS-SKW), Star Air Cargo wet-leased, ex-(9J-KDK).

October 2010: 737-2K9 (23405, 7Q-YKX), ex-(LAM), ex-(C9-BAI), 12 month leased to replace a 737-500 which is in need of maintenance.

January 2012: Nine African airlines have come together to purchase airplane fuel jointly, a move the carriers believe will increase their leverage and raise the value and quality of fuel being procured.

According to the African Airlines Association (AFRAA), the nine airlines participating in the program include Kenya Airways (KEN), Ethiopian Airlines (ETH), Air Malawi (AML), Air Namibia (NAM), Air Seychelles (ASY), (LAM) Mozambique Airlines, Precision Air (PRT), Rwandair (RWA) and TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG).

The (AFRAA), which said more of its 32 members could join the program in the future, stated that the joint fuel buying project "is aimed at attaining better and stable unit price of fuel for the participating airlines, assuring quality of the product and supply reliability whilst the relevant fuel suppliers will benefit from higher fuel volumes purchased by airlines. Other areas of focus include addressing the incidents of high taxes, charges and fees levied on fuel, especially in African airports, and lobbying stakeholders for the elimination of monopoly fuel suppliers at some airports."

The carriers will purchase about 700 million liters of fuel in aggregate annually valued at about $1.5 billion. Fuel purchasing contracts for this year have already been jointly negotiated by the nine carriers, the (AFRAA) said. While negotiations are being conducted by the carriers on a joint basis, fuel contracting will still be done by individual airlines.

"The contracts implementation dates will vary, with some airlines starting to purchase fuel under the [jointly] negotiated terms in February 2012," the (AFRAA) stated. "All contracts will, however, end in December 2012 and [be] replaced by new contracts for a full calendar year in 2013 and subsequent years following another bidding, evaluation, negotiation and awarding process to be carried out [jointly by the carriers] during the course of this year."

March 2012: Air Malawi (AML) has entered into a commercial partnership with JetLink Express ((IATA) Code J0, based at Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International (NBO)) and its new Kenyan partner has started operating CRJ-200s on behalf of Air Malawi (AML) from Blantyre Chileka International (BLZ) and Lilongwe Kumuzu International (LLW) via Dar-es-Salaam (DAR) to Nairobi Jomo Kenyatta International (NBO).

May 2012: Air Malawi (AML), based at Blantyre Chileka International airport (BLZ)) is facing major financial difficulties and has now been suspended from the (IATA) clearing house and billing and settlement plans no longer allowing it to interline with other carriers or sell to (IATA) travel agents.

November 2012: Kenya Airways (KEN) has been forced to stop selling seats between Lilongwe Kumuzu International airport (LLW), Malawi and Lusaka International airport (LUN), Zambia, following four years of operations on the route with fifth freedom rights. National carrier Air Malawi (AML) had complained to the government that Kenya Airways (KEN)'s low fares would prevent it from operating on the route. Air Malawi (AML) has now partnered with Air Botswana (BOT) which operates three weekly ATR42-500 round-trips between the two cities. Kenya Airways (KEN) operates a total of four weekly flights with a mix of EMB-170s, 767-300ERs and 777-200ERs but is now no longer allowed to carry local passengers.

December 2012: Air Malawi ((IATA) Code: QM; based at Blantyre Chileka International airport (BLZ)) (AML) could be sold to a consortium including Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) and Air Express based in Malawi. (ETH) as well as investment groups Globe Business Network from Botswana and Fly Africa as well as Alpha and Omega/Abrina from South Africa have been shortlisted as potential investors in the national carriers. Air Express is the only Malawian bidder and would have to hold the majority of the shares in a joint venture with any of the four other bidders based on the rules of the privatization process.

Kenya Airways (KEN) is expanding its influence in the African market by aligning itself with smaller carriers as it seeks to build its home base of Nairobi as a continental hub. This includes promoting greater cross-border cooperation and fostering economic development among nations which jealously guard their independence, despite the clear evidence that this has been a fundamental cause of their problems.

(KEN) as Africa’s fourth largest carrier and the continent's only member of the SkyTeam (STM) alliance is focusing on airlines in southern Africa, having already brought (LAM) Mozambique Airlines, Air Botswana (BOT), Air Malawi (AML) and TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG) into the fold.

On 20 December 2012, (KEN) and RwandAir (RWA) announced plans to form a strategic partnership and build stronger relations including improved synergies in scheduling, reservation systems and a combined frequent flyer plan. The partnership will also strengthen the airlines' cargo, maintenance and flight training operations.

Meanwhile, Ethiopian Airways (ETH) looks to strengthen its Addis Ababa hub, as the Gulf carriers (now partnering with some global alliance airlines) expand their global networks across Africa.

February 2013: Air Malawi ((IATA) Code: QM, based at Blantyre Chileka International (BLZ)) (AML) has suspended all remaining operations on Wednesday, February 13, returning its single 737-244 (22591, ZS-SIL) to SafAir (SFA). It has also laid off -90% of its staff, 243 employees, on the same day retaining the remainder of its staff to close down the company making way for a new Air Malawi (AML) to be launched later this year. The Malawian government's Public Private Partnership Commission has announced the results of its tender process on Friday, February 15 selecting Ethiopian Airlines ((IATA) Code: ET, based at Addis Ababa Bole International (ADD)) (ETH) as its partner for a successor of Air Malawi (AML). Ethiopian (ETH) will hold a 49% stake in the new airline with 20% to be held by the government and the remaining 31% by Malawian individuals or companies that Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) is free to choose.

June 2013: Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) is set to expand its sub-Saharan Africa footprint with the recent announcement that it will base its Central African hub out of Kinshasa N'Djili. According to (CEO), Tewolde Gebremariam, the establishment of the hub in Kinshasa would "secure transfer traffic amid growing competition from Middle Eastern operators". Turkish Airlines (THY) in particular is seen as a threat given their increased activity in the region as well as their purported involvement with the Congolese government in setting up a new national airline. Meanwhile, the airline's planned Southern African hub could hinge on Malawi following a recent announcement there by Minister of Transport and Public Works, Sidik Mia, that a renewed Air Malawi (AML), in which (ETH) acquired a 49% stake, should be operational "before the end of the month (June)". (ETH) also has designs on a potential carrier in Lusaka, Zambia, though no official confirmation on the project's current status is known.

July 2013: Air Malawi ((IATA) Code: QM, based at Blantyre) (AML) has officially been replaced by Malawi Airlines (Blantyre) (AML), the product of successful negotiations between the Malawian government and Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) begun earlier this year. The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Malawian Public Private Partnership Commission (PPPC), Mr Jimmy Lipunga, said the deal was now done, with Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) holding a 49% stake, while 31% would be open to Malawian investors with the Government holding the rest (20%). The Ernst & Young team that is working on the Air Malawi project is the same team which helped in the establishment of ASKY Airlines ((IATA) Code: KP, based at Lomé) (AKY) in 2010, in Togo. Mr Lipunga further added that USD20 million would be injected into the new company to capitalize it, while Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) would introduce two airplanes (likely DHC-8-400s). Air Malawi Ltd is currently being liquidated with its former fleet (a 737-300, a 737-500 and an ATR42-300) now up for sale to help raise funds to offset the former national carrier's debt burden.

Later, Malawian Airlines (AML) will launch operations with a 737-800 and a DHC-8-400 sourced from 49% shareholder, Ethiopian Airlines (ETH), it has emerged. According to Mr Jimmy Lipunga, the head of Malawi's Public Private Partnership Commission (PPPC), the airline will target Lilongwe, Blantyre, Karonga, and Mzuzu domestically, while regionally flights to Johannesburg O R Tambo, Harare International, Lusaka, Dar-es-Salaam and Luanda are planned. In the medium term, he added, the airline would explore intercontinental flights to new destinations "such as São Paulo Guarulhos in Brazil" to take advantage of growing Brazilian interests in Southern Africa. Industry analysts have speculated as to a possible mirroring of the model used by (ETH)'s successful West African venture, ASKY Airlines (AKY), which also initially focussed on building a strong short-haul network before venturing further afield. Mr Lipunga also stated that the airline's original launch date of July 1 had been delayed owing to differences in opinion between the Malawian government and (ETH) on the airline's name. (ETH) successfully argued that a full re-branding would help distance the new carrier from the battered, tarnished image of predecessor, Air Malawi, while helping to protect the new venture from what he termed "predatory creditors."

Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) has confirmed it will take a 49% stake in newly created Malawian Airlines (AML), after inking a shareholder agreement for the new carrier in Lilongwe on July 11. Co-owners in the Air Malawi successor will include the Malawian government and private Malawian investors, which will jointly own 51% of the airline.
“Through this strategic partnership, (ETH) and the newly formed Malawian Airlines (AML) will harmonize their flight schedules so as to provide seamless and best connectivity options for travelers within, to and from the Southern Africa region. The establishment of multiple hubs in Africa is an overarching strategy of our Vision 2025,” Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) (CEO), Tewolde Gebremariam said.

Under its 15-year "Vision 2025" strategy, (ETH) is planning to create multiple African hubs as it seeks to generate $10 billion in annual revenues by 2025. Lilongwe will become (ETH)’s third key airport, joining its main base in Addis Ababa and West African hub in Lome, home to its West African partner ASKY (AKY).

Gebremariam stressed that “partnerships are a must” for indigenous African airlines to succeed. SkyTeam (STM) alliance rival, Kenya Airways (KEN) is also looking for a West African partner, although it has struggled to find a suitable carrier.

February 2014: Malawian Airlines (AML), which was recently formed in July 2013 as a result of a joint venture (JV) with Ethiopian Airlines (ETH), began operations with the launch of its first services from its Lilongwe (LLW) base to Blantyre (BLZ) and to Harare (HRE) on January 30th, the latter being operated via Blantyre (BLZ). Due to the hectic start of the carrier, which was supposed to be launched on January 1st, the future situation of (AML)’s route network is uncertain. Both services will be served thrice-weekly, utilizing a mixed fleet of (ETH)’s 154-seat 737-800s and 69-seat DHC-8-Q400s. However, the flights to Malawi’s center of finance and commerce, Blantyre, will increase to twice-daily, once six more international routes will be launched to Tete, Lusaka, Dar es Salaam, Beira, Johannesburg and Maputo in February. (AML)’s first connections will face no competition from other carriers.

Malawian Airlines (AML), which just launched its first operations with services to Blantyre and Harare, expanded its presence in Africa with four new international routes from its Lilongwe (LLW) hub, all of which are operated via Blantyre utilizing Ethiopian Airlines (ETH)’s 737-800s and DHC-8-Q400s. With the longest sector being the 1,463 km service to Johannesburg (JNB), and the shortest being inaugurated to Tete (TET) in Mozambique at 237 km, (AML) faces competition only on the new route to Johannesburg from South African Airways (SAA)’s five weekly flights.

Bombardier Aerospace (BMB) welcomed Malawian Airlines (AML) of Lilongwe, Malawi, to its family of operators, following the airline’s introduction to service of a DHC-8-Q400 NextGen turboprop last month. As the 15th operator of this turboprop in Africa, (AML) has launched domestic and international flights with the dual-class DHC-8-Q400 NextGen airplane which was acquired from co-owner Ethiopian Airlines (ETH).

Founded in July 2013, Malawian Airlines (AML) is a public-private partnership between the Government of Malawi, Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) and Malawian institutional and individual investors. “The dual-class configured DHC-8-Q400 NextGen airplane is fitting in perfectly as we look to provide affordable and convenient air transport solutions to business and leisure travelers. With its outstanding performance (including its high speed and long-range cruise capability) we are keen to expand further over the next few months as our business plans grow to include new markets in the region, as well as higher frequencies,” said Kassim Geresu, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Malawian Airlines (AML).

“Furthermore, with the high costs of fuel, the fast, fuel-efficient DHC-8-Q400 NextGen turboprop airliner is the most cost-effective and flexible regional airplane solution for our operations,” added Mr Geresu.

March 2014: Malawian Airlines (AML) has confirmed the resumption of flights into and out of Blantyre. The airfield was closed when an inspection of its main runway, 10/28/2,325 m, revealed numerous potholes had formed following recent heavy rains.

With requisite repair work having been completed ahead of a March 31 deadline, Kenya Airways (KEN) has now resumed its flights to the Malawian commercial hub with Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) and South African Airways (SAA) expected to follow in due course.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
AML-737-2K9 2009-10
AML-737-522
AML-737-522 2006-02
AML-DHC-8-Q400-2014-01
AML-LET L41OU 2004-12

April 2016:

0 737-2B7 (JT8D) (986-22890, ZS-PUI), IN WHITE COLORS, EX-(5N-BFJ) 2008-01.

0 737-2H7C (JT8D) (304-20590, 3D-ZZM), (ITI) WET-LSD 2001-09. RTND.

0 737-2K9 (JT8D-17) (1178-23405, /85 7Q-YKX - - SEE PHOTO - - "AML-737-2K9 2009-10"), EX-(LAM), EX-(C9-BAI) 2009-11. 16C, 88Y.

0 737-219 (JT8D-15A HK) (1199-23474, /86 ZS-SKW), EX-(AEJ)/(ANZ), STAR AIR CARGO (SSZ) LSD 2009-09, EX-(9J-KDK). RTND. 120Y.

0 737-244 (JT8D-17A) (22591, ZS-SIL) RTND TO SOUTH AFRICAN LESSOR (SFA) 2013-02. 20C, 87Y.

1 737-33A (CFM56-3C1) (2045-25056, /91 7Q-YKP "KWACHA"), EX-(HOL), (AWW) LSD. FOR SALE. 13F, 118Y.

0 737-3L9 (CFM56-3) (1402-23718, /87 OO-CTX), RTND (TCI), LST (CBD).

1 737-522 (CFM56-3) (2149-25384, 7Q-YKW), EX-(UAL), BF Q AVIATION 2005-09. FO SALE. 12F, 120Y.

1 737-522 (CFM56-3) (2508-26704, 7Q-), EX-(UAL) 2005-12. FOR SALE. 12F, 120Y.

1 ATR 42-320 (PW121) (236, /91 7Q-YKQ "SHIRE"), FOR SALE. 46Y.

1 BOMBARDIER Q400, (ETH) LSD 2013-02.

1 CRJ-200, JETLINK EXPRESS OPS 2012-03.

0 DO 228-212 (TPE331-5-252D) (8222) SOLD 2000-03.

1 F28-4000.

2 CESSNA 208B (PT6A-114A) (0675, /98 7Q-YKU; 0668, /98 7Q-YKR), 9Y.

1 CESSNA 208B (PT6A-114A) (0682), GRAND CARAVAN, 9Y.

1 L-410UVP (7Q-YKV, "RUKURU"), 2004-09.

Management:
(definitions)

BRIAN BOWLER, CHAIRMAN (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

KASSIM GERESU, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO).

FRANCIS PELEKAMOYO, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO) (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

VICTOR LIKAKU, MANAGING DIRECTOR (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

CAPTAIN KALELO MKANDAWIRE, FLIGHT OPERATIONS DIRECTOR (BLZAPQM) (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

N KALINGA, OPERATIONS DIRECTOR (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

CAPTAIN AUBREY MAGOLA, CHIEF PILOT (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

CAPTAIN ABRAHAM MANGWANA, FLIGHT SAFETY OFFICER (BLZAPQM) (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

MAXWELL SERENJE, ENGINEERING DIRECTOR (BLZAPQM) (ed@malawi.net) (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

RODRICK CHATTAIKA, COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

PATSON KUNTAMBIL, FINANCIAL & ADMINISTRATION DIRECTOR (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

CALM MALUNGA, GROUND SERVICES MANAGER (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

TONY CHIMPUKUSO, INDUSTRY AFFAIRS MANAGER (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

BLACK KACHUMA, QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA)/PROJECTS MANAGER (2001-10) (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

HENDERSON CHILIMA, MAINTENANCE MANAGER (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

MARTIN JANA, SENIOR MAINTENANCE ENGINEER (FORMERLY WITH AIR MALAWI).

 
Top of Page

 

Since you are not logged in, we can show you only live Airtran Airways data. This page will demonstrate the depth of data we have for every airline. Close and View Airtran Airways ›