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Name: WEST AIR
7JetSet7 Code: CHO
Status: Operational
Region: CHINA
City: CHONGQING
Country: CHINA
Employees 3401
Web: chinawestair.com
Email: info@chinawestair.com
Telephone: +86 2386068888
Fax: +86 2386859600
Sita:
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
CHO - LOGO - 2014-11
CHO-2016-02 - Chongqing to SIA.jpg
CHO-2016-02 - Chongqing to Singapore.jpg

FORMED IN 2006 AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 2007. WAS FORMERLY THE CHONGQING BRANCH OF CHINA SOUTHWEST AIRLINES (XIN) UNDER THE NAME "CHONGQING AIRLINES" (CHO). PART OF "CHINA WEST AIR COMPANY LTD." SUBSIDIARY OF THE HAINAN (HNA) GROUP. DOMESTIC, REGIONAL, SCHEDULED & CHARTER, PASSENGER & CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
B21F No 76 XING GUANG DA DAO
GAO SIN YUAN
401120 CHONGQING, CHINA

China (People's Republic of China) was established in 1949, it covers an area of 9,560,980 sq km, its population is 1,265 million, its capital city is Beijing, and its official language is Chinese.

JUNE 1995: CHONGQING AIRLINES (CHO) HAS A JOINT OPERATION WITH CHINA NATIONAL AVIATION CORPORATION (CNAC). PUTS (CNAC) LOGO ON 2 737-300'S, 2 CHINA SOUTHWEST AIRLINES (XIN) 737-300'S, & 1 (XIN) 757.

DECEMBER 1995: NEW ROUTES DIRECT TO ZHUHAI & MACAU.

JANUARY 1996: CHINA HONG KONG, NEW PART OF CHINA NATIONAL AVIATION CORPORATION (CNAC), THE (CAAC) OWNED CORPORATION IN HONG KONG.

RECEIVES AWARD FOR "20 YEARS SAFE FLYING" MEDAL FROM THE (CAAC) (CAC).

NEGOTIATING FOR 10% STAKE IN DRAGONAIR (DRG).

HIRED FORMER DRAGONAIR (DRG) LEW ROBERTS, OPERATIONS GENERAL MANAGER. WANG GUI-XIANG, IS (CNAC) GENERAL MANAGER.

TO OPERATE 3 757'S INDEPENDENTLY FROM CHENGDU. (CNAC) ALREADY OPERATES 2 737-300'S & 1 757 CHARTER SERVICES FROM HONG KONG TO CHENGDU & CHONGQING. TO WITHDRAW 3 Y-7'S.

OCTOBER 1996: CHONGQING, WITH A POPULATION OF 15 MILLION, BECOMES A DISTRICT CITY.

JANUARY 1997: CHARTER SERVICE TO BANGKOK (737).

PLANS TO ADD 3 737-300'S TO PRESENT 6 BEFORE THE MIDDLE OF THIS YEAR.

APRIL 1997: CHARTER SERVICE TO SINGAPORE VIA CHENGDU.

THE CITY OF CHONGQING, WITH A 30 MILLION POPULATION, BECOMES A MUNICIPALITY LIKE BEIJING, SHANGHAI, AND TIANJIN. IT IS NO LONGER PART OF SICHUAN PROVINCE BUT IS INSTEAD PART OF THE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT.

MAY 1997: LIU WEN QI, GENERAL MANAGER REPLACES LI GUANG HAI LUO QI ZHANG, DIRECTOR ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT.

JUNE 1997: TO WUHAN & HUANGSHAN.

NOVEMBER 1997: 3 ORDERS (APRIL 1998) 737-300'S TRANSFERRED FROM ZHONGYANG AIRLINES (ZHO).

APRIL 1998: THE (CAAC) (CAC) OK'S NEW ROUTE TO SEOUL IN SEPTEMBER 1998.

CHINA SOUTHWEST AIRLINES (XIN) AGREED TO TRANSFER 2 757'S TO CHONGQING AIRLINES (CHO) (SEPTEMBER & OCTOBER 1998). (XIN) TO PURCHASE 3 737-800'S FOR (CHO).

MAY 1999: SHI BO, PRESIDENT, REPLACES LIU WEN, WHO IS NOW RESPONSIBLE FOR AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL (ATC) IN THE CHENGDU AREA.

NOVEMBER 1999: 1ST 737-8Z0 DELIVERY (30071, B-2510). USED FOR SERVICE TO SHENZHEN, HAIKOU, KUNMING, & URUMQI.

DECEMBER 1999: HEAVY MAINTENANCE CONTRACT FOR END-OF-LEASE CHECKS
FOR 6 737-300'S TO GAMECO (GUN). 1ST 2 (26070; 26072) IN JANUARY & FEBRUARY 2000, PRIOR TO RETURN TO GECAS (GEH).

JANUARY 2000: 2ND 737-8ZO (30072, B-2509) DELIVERY.

APRIL 2000: 3RD 737-8ZO DELIVERY (30073, B-2511). 2 737-300'S (PM413, B-2534; PM414, B-2595), RETURNED TO (GEH).

JULY 2000: TO SEOUL (737-800, 2/WEEK).

SEPTEMBER 2000: 737-3Q8 (26284) RETURNED TO (ILF).

OCTOBER 2000: 737-3Q8 (24988) RETURNED TO (ILF). 2 737-3ZO'S
(27373; 27521), TRANSFERRED FROM CHINA SOUTHWEST AIRLINES (XIN).

AUGUST 2001: 3 ORDERS (AUGUST 2002) TU-204'S.

OCTOBER 2001: 1 737-86N (28655, B-2161), (GEF) LEASED.

December 2005: Hainan Airlines (HNA), moved to set up a Low-Cost Carrier (LCC), to be named "Lucky Air" using 737's from its wholly owned subsidiary Shan'Xi Airlines (CHG) and to manage Chongqing Airlines (CHO) (later to change name to "West Air" (CHO)).

February 2006: Chongqing Airlines (CHO) (later to change name to "West Air" (CHO)) has been set up by local government-owned Chongqing Land Properties Group and will be managed, subject to (CAAC) (CAC) approval, by Hainan Airlines (HNA).

Chinese domestic airlines flew a record 138 million passengers in 2005, a rise of +15% over 2004 and double the number of 2000. The figure is expected to double again in the next five years, according to Gao Geng, the vice minister of the General Administration of Civil Aviation in China. Cargo and airmail throughput rose +14% to 3.04 million tons in 2005 and also is expected to double in the next five years. However, profit margins will remain tight within the sector. He noted revenues in the sector had grown to CNY170 billion/$21.09 billion at the end of 2005, but profits in the past five years had amounted to only CNY10 billion.

April 2007: China Southern Airlines (GUN) plans to partner with Chongqing Investment Corp to create "Chongqing Airlines" (CGQ), which is expected to launch operations in June with three A320s. The new carrier is expected to be approved by (CAAC) (CAC). (GUN) holds 60% with an investment of CNY720 million/$93 million, while Chongqing Investment has put in CNY480 million for the remaining stake. Chongqing Airlines (CGQ) aims to challenge Air China (BEJ) and China Eastern Airlines (CEA), the two dominant players in western China, for both passenger and cargo traffic. China Southern (GUN) cited its wish to "explore the western China air transport market" as the main reason for the venture, saying the region's market potential "is really big now." In December 2005, the (HNA) Group signed a framework agreement with Chongqing Real Estate Group (CREG) to start a Chongqing Airlines (CHO) (later to change name to "West Air" (CHO)). (HNA) planned to hold 75% with an investment of CNY60 million with (CREG) investing CNY20 million for the remainder. That airline has not been approved by the (CAAC) (CAC). (CAAC) (CAC) regulations prohibit two carriers operating under the same name. (HNA) now has said it would cede the name to (GUN) and call its new carrier "West Air" (CHO) instead.

June 2007: (HNA) Group subsidiary Lucky Air (LKY) will launch "West Air (CHO)" Hainan Airlines (HNA)'s new Low Cost Carrier (LCC), by June 18 in Chongqing, with three 737-300s transferred from the parent company (HNA).

The new carrier is expected to receive its operating license from the (CAAC) (CAC) soon. That carrier has yet to be approved by (CAAC) (CAC). The (HNA) Group is the parent of Hainan Airlines (HNA).

Lucky Air (LKY) and Jianying Investment Co each hold a 35% stake in the new "West Air (CHO)" with identical investments of CNY28 million/$3.7 million, while Sichuan Three Star General Aviation Co, Shenzhen Guorui Investment Company, and Xinjiang Siweida Technology Company each contributed CNY8 million for the remaining stakes.

With the skies over eastern China nearing saturation, several airlines are adopting a "Go West" strategy. (HNA)'s West Air (CHO) originally was slated to be called "Chongqing Airlines," but China Southern Airlines (GUN) had designs on its own western carrier and the same name. (HNA) had to re-brand to "West Air (CHO)" because (GUN) recently received (CAAC) (CAC) approval for its new subsidiary Chongqing Airlines (CGQ), which also is scheduled to launch next month. Meanwhile, Shenzhen Airlines (SHZ) plans to base its regional joint venture with Mesa Air Group, "Kunpeng Airlines" in Xi'an at year end.

Later, competition for passengers in western China intensified dramatically as China Southern Airlines (GUN) launched its new Chongqing Airlines (CGQ), while the (HNA) Group subsidiary, Lucky Air (LKY) began operating its Chongqing-based "West Air (CHO)."

Chongqing Airlines (CGQ) has noted that it mainly will target high-end customers and business (C) travelers. It has one A320 and expects its inaugural flight to take place on July 8 to Beijing, after which it will start serving Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Shanghai. It expects to be flying three airplanes by year end and operating 10 by 2010, when it plans to introduce the A330 on international routes. But its initial priority is to develop a domestic network covering second-tier cities and tourist destinations.

Lucky Air (LKY) will forge a different path with its new carrier, which Lucky (LKY) CEO, and West Air (CHO) President, Ma Guohua said will operate as a point-to-point Low Cost Carrier (LCC) offering tourism packages in conjunction with Lucky (LKY). Shandong Airlines (SHG), based in Jinan, also has announced its intention to start a Chongqing-based airline soon.

January 2009: (IATA) Code: PN - 847.

(ICAO) Code: CHB - (Callsign - WEST CHINA).

August 2010: 1st A319-133 (4262, B-6412) delivery from the Airbus Final Assembly Line China (FALC) in Tianjin.

January 2011: A320-232 (4569), delivered to Hainan Airlines (HNA) for West Air (CHO) operations ex-(D-AVVB).

April 2011: A320-232 (4687, B-6765), Hainan Air (HNA) leased, ex-(D-AUBB).

May 2011: Hainan Airlines (HNA) relaunched Chongqing-based, West Air (CHO) in conjunction with Chongqing Yufu Capital Management Company, which is controlled by the Chongqing municipal government. (HNA) didn’t reveal the exact figure but noted the combined investment was CNY3 billion/$460.8 million.

West Air (CHO) was initially launched in 2006 with a registered capital of CNY80 million. (HNA) subsidiary Lucky Air (LKY) and Jianying Investment Company both hold a 35% stake and Shenzhen Guorui Investment Company, Sichuan Sanxing General Aviation Company and Xinjiang Siweida Technology Company all have a 10% stake in (CHO).

West Air (CHO) operates a total fleet of nine airplanes, comprising four A319s, two 737-300s and three A320s on more than 20 domestic routes. (CHO) is expected to open international routes to Southeast Asia, Japan and South Korea by the end of 2012 and expand its fleet to 40 by 2015.

It is noteworthy that China Southern Airlines (GUN), which launched subsidiary Chongqing Airlines (CGQ) in 2006, signed a cooperation agreement this month with the Chongqing municipal government to enhance its position in Chongqing.

May 2013: Hainan Airlines (HNA) plans to re-brand its subsidiary, West Air (CHO) as a domestic low-cost carrier (LCC) to be better positioned in the West China market, according to Hainan (HNA) President, Wang Yingming.

June 2013: Hainan Airlines (HNA) has completed the re-branding of its subsidiary, West Air (CHO) as a low-cost carrier (LCC) to tap China’s fast-growing low-cost market.

A320-214 (5626, B-9949), Hong Kong Airlines (CRY) leased.

October 2013: A320-214 (5679, B-9982), EX-(B-519L), Hainan Airlines (HNA) leased.

December 2013: A320-214 (5912, B-1817), ex-(D-AUBA), Hong Kong Airlines (CRY) leased.

February 2014: West Air (CHO), a subsidiary of the (HNA) Group, which completed its transformation to a budget airline at the end of 2012, plans to increase its fleet. It will add four airplanes in 2014.

West Air (CHO) is a low cost carrier (LCC) operating schedule domestic services from its base in the south-western city of Chongqing to destinations including Fuzhou, Hakou, Sanya, Tianjin, and Xian.

Li Xiaojin, a professor at China Aviation University in Tianjin said
"We can expect more budget airlines in China because the (CAAC)'s support may make it easier to enter the business." He added "The Chinese are getting used to traveling by air, with air traffic growing fast and providing more customers on budget airlines."

Chinese airlines reported 319.36 million person-trips in 2012. The number reached 326.1 million in the first 11 months of 2013, according to the (CAAC). But it is still difficult to operate budget airlines, which need to lower their costs and improve load factors at the same time, Li said. "Low-cost carriers (LCC)s need enough passenger flow to make a profit because their ticket prices are low."

Improving efficiency is the main strategy for budget airlines to lower operational costs. West Air (CHO)'s overall costs in 2013 were reduced -15% over 2012 through improving plane-use rates and upgrading operational systems.

The daily use rate of an airplane by West Air (CHO) is about 12 to 13 hours, while the average number in the industry is about 9.8 hours a day, said Liu Feihu, Operations Control Manager of (CHO)'s Operations Control Center. "Reducing the ground handling time is an important way to improve the use-rate," he added.

(CHO), which operates 13 A320 family airplanes, flies more than >70 domestic flights daily. Accordingly, (CHO)'s ticket prices are about -15% lower than the market average. (CHO) provided more than >10,000 tickets with -70 to -90% discounts. Some tickets were only priced at 8 yuan in November 2013.

After the transformation from being a traditional airline into a low-cost carrier (LCC), West Air (CHO)'s flights' load factor also increased by +5%, reaching 90% LF.

However, low-cost carriers (LCC)s still have to cultivate the market before they can gain more market share. "People's acceptance of budget airlines is still a challenge for us," says Cen Jianjun, VP of West Air (CHO). As an (LCC), (CHO) still provides in-flight food and a free luggage check-in service, which incur extra fees at other budget airlines, Cen said.

Chinese budget airlines also need to increase income from non-flight business, which is a common strategy among (LCC)s. Income from non-flight business accounted for only 3% of West Air (CHO)'s total income in 2013, while the percentage for Air Asia (ASW) was about 20%.

Currently, (CHO)'s non-flight business includes insurance, hotel booking, tourism and vehicle rental. (CHO) plans to increase income from non-flight business by +5% in 2014 by offering extra services.
"We will provide full travel services in the future," said Xiao Lin, (CHO) General Manager Marketing & Sales.

(CHO) also benefits from its parent group having other tourism subsidiaries covering hotels, travel agencies and tourism destinations. "It's easier for us to benefit from the cooperation," Xiao added.

June 2014: 2 A320-232s (6023, B-9969; 6076, B-1897), ex-(F-WWBZ & D-AXAM), BOC Aviation (SIL) leased.

September 2014: It seems that low-cost carrier (LCC), West Air (CHO) moves on faster than others on the way of (LCC) transformation.
(CHO) launched a service between Quanzhou and Shanghai, its first Shanghai service since its foundation. "The company has reformed its operations and marketing system and completed most of the transformation procedures. Meanwhile, (CHO) is mulling more differentiated services," said Captain Ma Jianbo, Chief Pilot of (CHO).

Under the full-service business mode, (CHO) started service on June 14, 2007 with a fleet comprising of both Boeing and Airbus airplanes. Starting 2012, (CHO) began to operate a unified fleet of A320s, which was seen as one of the important measures of its (LCC) transformation.

"The strong travel demand in Chongqing lays a solid foundation for our transformation," a senior executive of (CHO) said.

(CHO) replaced its first (F) class and business (C) class seats with economy (Y) seats, reduced the stopover time and raised the utilization rate of its airplanes, as well as provide more services with additional fees."

What's more, (CHO) lays stress on online direct sales. Now, online direct sales account for more than >40%, compared with less than <10% two years ago.

However, it's not easy to run as a (LCC) in China due to fixed cost, which includes fuel, airplane purchase, airport charges, and so on. "As a new operating mode, the (LCC) is still in the initial phase in China and the (CAAC) has provided strong support for the development of the (LCC)," Ma said.

November 2014: The following was extracted from a centreforaviation.com (CAPA) report on the current status of West Air (CHO). West Air (CHO) is the first example of an airline in China fully to transition to the low-cost carrier (LCC) model. (CHO) charges for meals and lounge access. It has boosted utilization rates, partially by using earlier slots, and has decreased turn-around times.

Based in Chongqing (where a China Southern (GUN) subsidiary may also become a (LCC)), West Air (CHO)'s impetus to adapt to the (LCC) model was that the lower incomes in the west are better suited to a (LCC) model. (CHO)r is the fourth-largest (LCC) in China and sixth largest in Northeast Asia.

The entirely domestic carrier, sporting a new modern logo, is expected to carry over >4 million passengers in 2014. (CHO) hopes to maintain growth momentum as it grows its fleet from 16 airplanes in 2014 to 40 within three to five years and later 100 airplanes.

West Air (CHO) traffic is up +35% in 2014, and is expected to carry 4 million passengers. (CHO) has achieved double-digit passenger traffic growth every year of its existence. (CHO) was founded as a full-service airline in 2005 and flew for the first time in June 2007. In mid-2012 it started transitioning to the (LCC) model.

2014 growth should be higher than 2013, with traffic in the first nine months of 2014 up +35%. In the first nine months of 2013, traffic was up +22% from 2012 levels. Having carried 3.3 million passengers in the first nine months of 2014, (CHO) is on track to carry >4 million passengers in a year for the first time.

On fleet size alone, West Air (CHO) is the 24th largest (LCC) in Asia (all areas). Looking only at Northeast Asia, (CHO) is the 6th largest. Within China, (CHO) is the 4th largest behind Spring Airlines (CQH), China United (CUL) and Lucky Air (LKY).

Hainan Air (HNA) HNA made a logical move to transform West Air (CHO) into a (LCC). (CHO)'s base in western China is still growing economically. Incomes are lower, so the low-cost model is logical. It has moved to a a single airplane fleet type (although anything else would have been challenging even as a full-service airline given its small size), single-class configuration, cut commission for travel agents, grown direct sales (up from 10% in 2012 to 40% in 2014), and started charging for priority boarding (CNY25/USD4) as well as meals (CNY46/USD 7.50) and lounge access (CNY100/USD16).

West Air (CHO) aims to connect its bases with secondary cities; nearly two-thirds of its flights are to non-capital cities. Focusing on secondary cities has many valid reasons: competition with high-speed rail to secondary points is lower, slots are more plentiful and subsidies can be greater on thinner routes. Routes from China's west can be lower-yielding, and those to secondary points even lower-yielding. As a non-state-owned airline, (CHO) may also face difficulties securing approval for prime routes.

In some instances this could be due to favoritism shown towards state-owned carriers. In other instances it could be because West Air (CHO) does not operate large airplanes. Some route permissions have been known to be granted on the condition a large airplane is used. Just under half of (CHO)'s routes see daily service or more.

West Air is part of the (HNA)'s group segmentation strategy. More growth will come with regulatory permission. Many airlines in Europe and Asia are embarking on dual-brand strategies that comprise a full-service airline with a (LCC). For China's expansive (HNA) Group that has multiple airlines, the strategy is not simply multi-brand but multi-type.

The (HNA) group aims to have full-service airlines (such as Hainan Airlines (HNA), (LCC) (West Air (CHO)) and regional (Tianjin Airlines (GCR)). (CHO) and sister (LCC) HK Express (HKE) lead the charge for (LCC) development in the (HNA) Group. (HNA) may lack the advantages that government favoritism delivers, but it can make up for that with agility.

HK Express (HKE) has had a bolder and more thorough transformation to the (LCC) platform, but its operating environment in Hong Kong is more conducive to that. West Air (CHO) is already a positive example within the (HNA) Group. (HNA)'s (LCC) portfolio will undoubtedly expand in depth and quality, supported by further regulatory loosening.

September 2015: West Air (CHO) has introduced its first self-service check-in kiosk at Chongqing Jiangbei International Airport (CKG), marking a start of self-service deployed by Chinese low-cost carriers (LCC)s.

A brand new self-service check-in kiosk is now deployed at 01/02 counter of 2D in T2B of Chongqing airport, which could offer check-in, boarding check print, bag tagging, overweight luggage charge, added-value product purchase and other services.

Passengers can use multiple ways to pay extra luggage fees and other value-added services through mobile phones or other mobile devices, free from bundled consumption by ordering air tickets through a third party.

So far, the new equipment is on trial operation and more self-service functions will be added, as well as more check-in kiosks that will be deployed all over the domestic airports.

Through the application of the self-service device, West Air (CHO) has become the first domestic budget airline to provide such service and greatly improve check-in efficiency.

October 2015: "West Air to Officially Charge Seat Selection Fees from Late October" by Joy Wong, WCARN.com October 27, 2015.

Passengers will have to pay an additional fee for selecting a seat when traveling with West Air (CHO) starting late October. The seat assignment policy not only apply to the extra legroom seats, but all seats on its domestic flights.

Actually, (CHO) the Chongqing-based budget carrier has started trying seat selection fees from the beginning of the year. After nearly one year's trial, (CHO) found that the extra fees could be accepted by customers and did not affect its passenger load factor. (CHO) decided to extend the paid service to all domestic flights from late October.

(CHO) charges an additional fee ranging from 1 yuan to 60 yuan for selecting a seat (60 yuan for the first-row seats, 40 yuan for the 2 - 3 rows, 20 yuan for the 4 - 10 rows and 14 - 23 rows, and 1 yuan for the 24 row, according to (CHO)'s charge standard for seat assignment).

West Air (CHO) was officially transformed into a budget airline in September 2013. (CHO) started charging for checked baggage from late March.

Spring Airlines (CQH), China's largest budget carrier, started charging seat selection fees from 2011, and is the first airline to launch such service in China. (CQH) has made a detailed charge standard for seat assignment. On international routes, (CQH) charges 130 yuan for the first-row seats, 80 yuan for the second-row seats, 70 yuan for the emergency row seats, 50 yuan for the seats in the front part of the aircraft, and 20 yuan for the seats in the back part of the aircraft. On domestic routes, (CQH) charges fees ranging from 5 yuan to 50 yuan for seat selection.

Extra legroom charges are becoming a more frequent part of the traveling experience. Some full-service carriers, such as Air China (BEJ), China Eastern Airlines (CEA), China Southern Airlines (GUN), Hainan Airlines (HNA), and Xiamen Airlines (XIA), have started charging seat selection fees on some designated flights since last year.

See attached - - "CHO-A320 - New Logo-2015-10.jpg."

January 2016: News Item A-1: "Hainan Airlines (HNA) Subsidiaries Launch Low Cost Carrier (LCC) Alliance" by (ATW) Katie Cantle, January 18, 2016.

Hainan Airlines (HNA)’s four subsidiaries have formed a partnership being hailed as the world’s first low-cost carrier (LCC) alliance.

The U-FLY Alliance brings together Hong Kong-based Hong Kong Express Airlines (HKE), Kunming-based Lucky Air (LKY), Urumqi-based Urumqi Airlines (URQ), and Chongqing-based, West Air (CHO).

Member carriers said that under the U-Fly Alliance they will deepen their cooperation and optimize slots connection. Together, they operate a total of 67 aircraft on 168 routes with 298 daily departures covering 85 Asian destinations.

“With the launch of the first low cost carriers (LCC) alliance in the world, the air transport market will enter into a new era, when passengers can fly to more diversified destinations and enjoy more secure flying experience with much lower air fares.” U-Fly Alliance Chairman, Ma Zhimin said.

Meantime, the U-Fly alliance also promoted special launch fares on certain routes. The alliance said it plans to attract more member airlines to expand its route network in the coming days, but there was no mention of shared frequent flier or loyalty benefits.

Hainan Airlines (HNA) is not a member of any of the present three global alliances.

News Item A-2: China Aircraft Leasing Group (CALC) (CHD) has entered into the 2nd aircraft purchase agreements with Airbus (EDS) for +2 more Airbus A320-200ceo series aircraft, in addition to the agreement for acquiring 22 aircraft signed December 31, 2015, to cater to strong customer demand of the Group’s aircraft. (CHD) also announced it has signed letters of intent with 2 subsidiaries of the (HNA) Group, Lucky Air (LKY) and West Air (CHO), on January 5, 2016, for the leases of 2 A320ceos, respectively. These 4 aircraft are expected to be delivered in 2016.

February 2016: "West Air (CHO) Launches Key Singapore Schedule" by
(ATW) Jeremy Torr, February 4, 2016.

Chongqing-based, West Air (CHO) has launched a new 3x-weekly, schedule from Chongqing Jiangbei International Airport to Singapore’s Changi Airport with 180-seat Airbus A320-200 aircraft. The service is (CHO)’s 1st international schedule, aimed at both trade and leisure travel.

The new schedule comes weeks after the signing of a memorandum of cooperation between Changi Airport Group (CAG) and Chongqing Airport Group to enhance connectivity between the two hubs.

The memorandum also includes carriers SilkAir (SLK), Air China (BEJ), (CHO), and Chongqing Airlines (CGQ), which will be part of the push to boost both point-to-point and transfer traffic at the 2 hubs.

Chongqing, which has said it plans to be 1 of China’s top 4 airports by 2035, can handle just >30 million passengers a year but is expanding both terminal and runway capacity to give it a 45 million-passenger and 1 million tonnes-cargo capacity by the end of 2016.

Chongqing Jiangbei serves the Chongqing - Chengdu economic corridor, which with some 120 million population, is one of the faster growing industrial zones in China. It houses extensive aviation, electronic and agricultural industries as well as coal, iron and steel production.

The upcoming expansion to a 3-terminal, 3-runway facility will make it the largest airport in western China and a key component of China premier Xi Jinping’s One Belt, One Road strategic plan.

“Western China represents exciting untapped growth opportunities,” said (CAG) Senior VP Market Development, Lim Ching Kiat. (CAG) said the 2 airports would continue to grow develop air connectivity and promote trade and tourism between Singapore and Chongqing.

September 2016: A320-214 (7325, B-8642), ex-(F-WWIE) delivery.

February 2017: West Air (CHO), a low-cost carrier (LCC) subsidiary of the (HNA) Group, has filed applications with the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC), seeking to operate flights into the Philippines starting this March.

(CHO) plans to fly 3x-weekly on the Chongqing - Cebu route and 4x-weekly on Chongqing - Kalibo route, the (CAAC) said in an announcement issued on its official website.

Both routes will be operated using Airbus A320 aircraft.

West Air (CHO) launched its 1st ever international flights to Singapore in February 2016.

September 2017: West Air (CHO) has undertaken over half its capacity in the Jiangbei - Changi route, and this is presently its only single international route. At present 10% capacity of Chongqing Jiangbei Airport is provided by West Air (CHO). And (CHO) is the only one which operates the Chongqing Jiangbei - Wenshan Puzhehei route. Although the number of passengers is relatively small, it should be viewed from the point of development. Puzhehei is the famous tourist site in Yunnan province, so this route may have more room to improve in the future.

As the 3rd runway and corresponding facilities of Chongqing Jiangbei International Airport have been officially put into use, transportation capacity will be greatly improved. It is also a great opportunity for airlines to benefit from the route network of Jiangbei Airport.

From an analysis of base airlines operating at Chongqing Jiangbei Airport, including capacity, waypoints, routes and overnight planes, it provides an interesting assessment of each of the airlines, especially as regards the opening of new routes. At present, Jiangbei Airport has the following base airlines: Air China (BEJ), Sichuan Airlines (SIC), Chongqing Airlines (CGQ), West Air (CHO), China Express (G5), Shandong Airlines (SHG), Shenzhen Airlines (SHZ), and Xiamen Air (XIA).

These base airlines account for over half the capacity of Jiangbei Airport, while West Air (CHO) accounts for 10%; compared with major airlines, small airlines can only focus on 1 or 2 routes.

8 base airlines accounted for 62% capacity of Chongqing Jiangbei Airport, and Air China (BEJ) and Sichuan Airlines (SIC) are in a leading position among them. West Air (CHO) accounts for 10% capacity in the increasingly fierce market competition, so it must have its own advantages.

West Air (CHO) is limited in size, but its capacity at Jiangbei Airport is accessible to 32 domestic cities; compared with other base airlines, Shenzhen Airlines (SHZ) has less capacity at Jiangbei airport. Sichuan Airlines (SIC) has good international accessibility while Air China (BEJ) needs to increase international waypoints.

Sichuan Airlines (SIC)'s international accessibility is good and since last October, it has cancelled its South Korea route and opened a Vietnam route because of the development of tourism in Vietnam. This is an opportunity, but there are also strong competitors such as Air China (BEJ).

Air China (BEJ) doesn't have many foreign waypoints and it mainly focuses on Hong Kong, Taiwan and Vietnam. Although there are certain advantages on these routes, with the rapid development of this domestic airport in recent years, (BEJ) needs to increase waypoints properly. Overall, foreign waypoints are not enough for these 8 base airlines. Chongqing is an important strategic fulcrum of Western Development as well as a connecting point of "The Belt and Road" construction and Yangtze River Economic Zone. With the development of "The Belt and Road," Jiangbei airport is bound to face new opportunities and challenges. It is also a good time to develop international routes for base airlines.

Beijing, Guangzhou and Hangzhou are the top-quality routes' destinations for many base airlines at Jiangbei Airport. Air China (BEJ) dominantly accounts for 52% of the capacity on the Beijing - Chongqing route. China Express has 3 high-density routes but its departure frequency is not high. Sichuan Airlines (SIC) puts high-density routes to large hub airports. West Air (CHO) accounts for 11.9% of the capacity in the Chongqing - Guangzhou route, but the on-time rate still needs to be improved compared to other airlines.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
CHO-737-EQ8-NOV08
CHO-A320 - New Livery-2015-10.jpg
CHO-A320-200 - 2017-02.jpg

September 2017:

0 737-3Q8 (CFM56-3C1) (2418-26284, /93; 2480-26288, /93; 2519-26292, /93; 2772-26325, /96 B-2963), EX-(XIN), 26284 RTND 2000-09, 26288 RTND (ILF) 2000-09, LST (XIA); 24988 RTND 2000-10. (ILF) LSD 2007-06. RTND. 148Y.

0 737-3YO (CFM56-3B2) (2349-26070, /92; 2369-26072, /92), EX-(XIN), RTND (GEH) 2000-04.

0 737-3Z0 (CFM56-3) (2658-27373, /94 B-2951; 2738-27521, /95 B-2957), (XIN) LSD. RTND.

0 737-36N (CFM56-3C1) (3118-28602, /99 B-2113; 3124-28606, /99 B-2115), LIFT LSD 2009-06. RTND. 144Y.

3 ORDERS 737-300 (CFM56-3), XFRD FROM (ZHO):

0 737-8ZO (CFM56-7B) (381-30071, /99 B-2510; 466-30072, /00 B-2509; 487-30073, 3/00 B-2511), (XIN) LSD. RTND. 8F, 160Y.

0 737-86N (CFM56-7B) (965-28655, /01 B-2161), EX-(XIN), (GEF) LSD. RTND.

0 757-2ZO, (XIN) LSD. RTND.

0 757-2ZO (RB211-535E4), (ETOPS) EQ'PD. 4 RTND.

1 A319-133 (V2527M-A5) (4262, /10 B-4262), EX-(B-506L), (HNA) LSD 2010-08. 144Y.

1 A319-133 (V2527M-A5) (4452, /10 B-6413), (HNA) LSD 2010-09. 144Y.

2 A319-133 (V2527M-A5) (4995, /12 B-6421; 5105, /12 B-6420), 2012-04. 138Y.

2 ORDERS (2016-06) A320ceo:

1 A320-214 (5626, B-9949, 2013-06; 5912, B-1817, 2013-12), EX-(D-AUBA), (CRY) LSD. 180Y.

1 A320-214 (5912, B-1817), EX-(B-519L), (HNA) LSD 2013-10.

1 A320-214 (7325, B8642), EX-(F-WWIE) 2016-09.

1 A320-232 (V2527-A5) (4482, /011 B-6763), 2011-04. 174Y.

2 A320-232 (V2527-A5) (4569, /11 B-6743; 4687, B-6765, 2011-04), AERVENTURE LSD, EX-(D-AVVB & D-AUBB). 174Y.

1 A320-232 (V2527-A5) (4644, /11 B-6811), 2011-07. 174Y.

1 A320-232 (V2527-A5) (4686, /11 B-6790), 2011-05. 174Y.

2 A320-232 (V2527-A5) (6023, B-9969; 6076, B-1897), EX-(F-WWBZ & D-AXAM), (BOC) AVIATION (SIL) LSD 2014-06. 174Y.

3 0AN-24 (LYC AL-24).

4 TU-154M (SOL D-30KY).

3 ORDERS TU-204:

3 XAC Y-7-100 (WJ5A-1).

Management:
(definitions)

GUAN LEI, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO).

MA GUOHUA, PRESIDENT (CHO) & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO) (LKY).

XIDONG WONG, (CEO).

SHI BO, PRESIDENT (1999-05) & GENERAL MANAGER.

YU SHI PING, VICE GENERAL MANAGER TECHNICAL DIVISION (2001-06).

XIAO LIN, GENERAL MANAGER MARKETING & SALES.

LI CHUN SHENG, DIRECTOR MAINTENANCE.

YU SHI PING, DIRECTOR MAINTENANCE BASE (1996-07).

LUO QI ZHONG, DIRECTOR ENGINEERING (1997-05).

ZHANG MINGSHENG, VICE DIRECTOR QUALITY CONTROL (QC) (CHIEF INSPECTOR) (2000-04).

GUO SHUANG LIN, VICE DIRECTOR PRODUCTION & EQUIPMENT (1996-07).

DENG ZHUANG ZHI, VICE DIRECTOR ENGINEERING (1996-07).

LIU FEIHU, OPERATIONS CONTROL CENTER.

CAPTAIN MA JIANBO, CHIEF PILOT.

YANG GUI BIN, CHIEF ENGINEER (1996-07).

XIA CE WAN, CHIEF INSPECTOR.

 
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