Please login to access all features of this site
  User Name Password  
7jetset7 Logo 7jetset7 Logo  

7jetset7 Home7jetset7 World Map7jetset7 Airlines7jetset7 Help7jetset7 Account7jetset7 SubscribeFree Content ViewAbout 7jetset77jetset7 FeedbackContact 7jetset7

7jetset7 Blog

    
Airlines

printable version
Name: EMIRATES AIRLINE
7JetSet7 Code: EAD
Status: Operational
Region: MIDDLE EAST
City: DUBAI
Country: UAE
Employees 75000
Web: emirates.com
Email: media.relations@emirates.com
Telephone: +971 4 295 1111
Fax: +971 4 295 5817
Sita: DXBCAEK
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
EAD-2003-12-A
EAD-2003-12-B
EAD-2003-12-C
EAD-2003-12-D
EAD-2003-12-E
EAD-2003-12-NEWS-1
EAD-2003-12-NEWS-2
EAD-2003-12-NEWS-3
EAD-2003-12-NEWS-4
EAD-2003-12-NEWS-5
EAD-2003-12-NEWS-6
EAD-2003-12-NEWS-7
EAD-2004-01 WLDTOP25-2003
EAD-2004-04 1STQTOPRPK
EAD-2004-04-NEWS A340-500
EAD-2004-06-NEWS-A340-500
EAD-2004-09-NEWS
EAD-2004-11 C CLASS-A
EAD-2004-11 C CLASS-B
EAD-2004-12-ARSENAL FC SPONSOR
EAD-2004-12-NEWS-A
EAD-2004-WORLD-RPK
EAD-2005-01-A380
EAD-2005-03-NEWS 777-A
EAD-2005-05-NEWS 1ST 777-A
EAD-2005-06-A
EAD-2005-06-B
EAD-2005-TOP-RPK
EAD-2006 WLD TOP RPK
EAD-2006-01-A
EAD-2006-01-B
EAD-2006-01-C
EAD-2006-01-D
EAD-2006-12 FIFA
EAD-2007-11-BIG ORDER
EAD-2007-11-NEWS-APL ORDERS
EAD-2008-03-A380 ROUTE PLANS
EAD-2008-06 INTRO
EAD-2008-07 TOPWLD6MTHSRPK
EAD-2008-09-A
EAD-2008-09-B
EAD-2008-09-C
EAD-2008-09-D
EAD-2008-09-E
EAD-2008-09-F
EAD-2008-12 GREEN NEWS
EAD-2009-01 WLD-TOP-RPK-2008
EAD-2009-03 A380-RELIABILITY
EAD-2009-08-A380-A
EAD-2009-08-A380-B
EAD-2009-08-A380-C
EAD-2009-08-A380-D
EAD-2009-08-A380-E
EAD-2009-08-A380-F
EAD-2009-08-A380-G
EAD-2009-08-A380-H
EAD-2009-08-A380-I
EAD-2009-08-A380-J
EAD-2009-08-A380-K
EAD-2009-08-A380-L
EAD-2009-08-A380-M
EAD-2009-08-A380-N
EAD-2009-08-A380-O
EAD-2009-08-A380-P
EAD-2009-11-NEWS
EAD-2010-06-A380 ORDER-A
EAD-2010-06-A380 ORDER-B
EAD-2010-06-A380 ORDER-C
EAD-2010-06-A380 ORDER-D
EAD-2010-06-AL MAKTOUM AIRPORT
EAD-2010-08-WLD RPK-2009
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-A
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-B
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-C
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-D
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-E
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-F
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-G
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-H
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-I
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-J
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-K
EAD-2010-09-25 YRS-L
EAD-2011-01-2010 WORLD TOP TRAFFIC
EAD-2011-01-AIRLINE OF YR-A
EAD-2011-01-AIRLINE OF YR-B
EAD-2011-01-AIRLINE OF YR-C
EAD-2011-01-AIRLINE OF YR-D
EAD-2011-01-RECORD PROFITS
EAD-2011-10-SEA TO DBX
EAD-2011-11-BIGGEST AND BIGGER
EAD-2011-11-RECORD 777 ORDER
EAD-2012-03 - 1000TH 777
EAD-2012-03-1000TH 777
EAD-2012-03-1000TH 777-A
EAD-2012-03-1000TH 777-B
EAD-2012-03-SEATTLE-DUBAI
EAD-2012-09 - QANTAS PARTNERSHIP
EAD-2012-12 - LAST 5 YEARS GROWTH
EAD-2012-12 - MEB3 DESTINATIONS SERVED
EAD-2012-12 - MEB3 WEEKLY ASM
EAD-2012-12 - MEB3 WEEKLY FREQUENCIES
EAD-2012-12 - MEB3 WEEKLY SEATS
EAD-2012-12 - QAN - A
EAD-2012-12 - QAN - B
EAD-2012-12 - QAN - C
EAD-2012-12 - QAN - D
EAD-2012-12 - QAN - E
EAD-2012-12 - ROUTE MAP AFRICA
EAD-2012-12 - ROUTE MAP ASIA
EAD-2012-12 - ROUTE MAP EUROPE
EAD-2012-12 - ROUTE MAP NORTH AMERICA
EAD-2012-12 - ROUTE MAP OCEANIA
EAD-2012-12 - ROUTE MAP SOUTH AMERICA
EAD-2013-01 - DUBAI A380 CONCOURSE A
EAD-2013-01 - TO MIAMI AND BOSTON
EAD-2013-04 - QAN PARTNERSHIP LAUNCH
EAD-2013-04 - STOCKHOLM OK SEPT
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-A
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-B
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-C
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-D
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-E
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-F
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-G
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-H
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-I
EAD-2013-07 - A380 5 YRS-J
EAD-2013-08 - ACJ319 - A
EAD-2013-08 - ACJ319 - B
EAD-2013-08 - ACJ319 - C
EAD-2013-08 - FLIGHT CREW AD A380 FO
EAD-2013-10 - DWC OPENS
EAD-2013-10 - TOP 12 INDIAN ROUTES FROM DUBAI
EAD-2013-11 - ANOTHER 50 A380
EAD-2014-01-TOP 2013 WORLD AIRLINES-A
EAD-2014-01-TOP 2013 WORLD AIRLINES-B
EAD-2014-03-TO BOSTON-A
EAD-2014-03-TO BOSTON-B
EAD-2014-07-50TH A380
EAD-2014-09 - NEW DUBAI AIRPORT
EAD-2014-12 - EXECUTIVE CHARTER A319
EAD-2015-01 - A380 LAX Landing.jpg
EAD-2015-04 - CONCOURSE D AT DUBAI.jpg
EAD-2015-04 - TOP 25 WORLD TRAFFIC.jpg
EAD-2015-04 - TOP REGIONAL TRAFFIC.jpg
EAD-2015-09 - Dubai to Orlando.jpg
EAD-2015-10 - A380 High Density.jpg
EAD-2015-11 - Top 10 Destinations.jpg
EAD-2016 In Review - December 2016.jpg
EAD-2016-08 - 777 Accident.jpg
EAD-2016-10 - Thales IFE for 777X.jpg
EAD-2016-11 - A380-388Q Upper Deck C Class.jpg
EAD-2017-01 - 2016 In Review.jpg
EAD-2017-03 - Dubai to Newark.jpg
EAD-2017-07 - Dubai to Phnom Penh Cambodia.jpg
EAD-2017-11 787-10 Dreamlinere Order.jpg
EAD-2017-11 Dubai Air Show from Space.jpg
EAD-2017-11 New 777 First Class-A.jpg
EAD-2017-11 New First Class-B.jpg
EAD-2017-11 New First Class-C.jpg
EAD-2017-11 New First Class-D.jpg
EAD-2017-12 40 787-9 Buy.jpg
EAD-2018-01 A380 Order.jpg
EAD-2018-07 Future Captain.jpg
EAD-A380 100th 2017-11-A.jpg
EAD-A380 C Class Upper Lounge-2017-11.jpg
EAD-A380 Upper Deck Business Class-2017-11.jpg
EAD-AIRPORT DUBAI INTNL DXB - 2012-01
EAD-AIRPORT-LGW LOUNGE - 2005-10
EAD-Business Class - A380-2016-03-B.jpg
EAD-CABIN ATTENDANT - 2012-02
EAD-Cabin Attendant 2015-05-Q.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendant 2018-06-Z.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendant 2018-07-AA.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendant 2018-08 aa.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendant 2018-08 zz.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendant 2018-10 s.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendant Young Captain.jpg
EAD-CABIN ATTENDANTS - 2008-06
EAD-CABIN ATTENDANTS - 2013-08
EAD-CABIN ATTENDANTS - 2015-04.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendants - 2016-02-U.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendants - 2016-02-V.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendants - 2016-02-W.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendants - 2016-02-X.jpg
EAD-Cabin Attendants - 2016-02-Y.jpg
EAD-FIRST CLASS - 2012-03
EAD-FIRST CLASS - 2013-02
EAD-First Class - A380 Bed-2016-03.jpg
EAD-First Class Bathroom - A380.jpg
EAD-First Class Reception-A380.jpg
EAD-FLIGHT CREW CABIN ATTENDANTS - 2013-08
EAD-FLT CREW JOBS-2010-06-A
EAD-FLT CREW JOBS-2010-06-B
EAD-FLT CREW JOBS-2010-06-C
EAD-FLT CREW JOBS-2010-06-D
EAD-FLT CREW JOBS-2010-06-E
EAD-FLT CREW JOBS-2010-06-F
EAD-FLT CREW JOBS-2010-06-G
EAD-IN FLIGHT MOBILE PHONE
EAD-LOGO
EAD-MAINTENANCE MRO
EAD-NEWS A340-500
EAD-NEWS DAE LAUNCH
EAD-NEWS-AIRBUS ORDER
EAD-NEWS-FLEET
EAD-ONAIR A380 CONNECTIVITY-2011-12
EAD-PAPERLESS TRAVEL - 2011-11
EAD-Premium Bar - A380-2016-03.jpg
EAD-ROUTE MAP A380 - 2013-08
EAD-VISIT BOSTON USA
EAD-Visit Burj Khalifa Tower.jpg
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-A
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-A - 2013-08
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-AA
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-B
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-C
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-D
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-E
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-F
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-G
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-H
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-HOTEL
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-I
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-J
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-K
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-L
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-M
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-N
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-O
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-P
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-Q
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-R
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-S
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-T
EAD-VISIT DUBAI-U-2014-10
EAD-VISIT INDIA - 2012-05

FORMED AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 1985. DOMESTIC, REGIONAL, & INTERNATIONAL, SCHEDULED, PASSENGER AND CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
PO BOX 686
AIRLINE CENTRE, FLAME ROUNDABOUT
DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (UAE)

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES (UAE) (AL IMARAT AL-ARABIYA AL-MUTTAHIDA): POPULATION: 3.5 MILLION. A FEDERATION OF 7 SHEIKDOMS, UNDER BRITISH PROTECTION UNTIL 1971, THE (UAE) HAS ROCKETED IN A GENERATION FROM RURAL AND POOR, TO URBAN AND OIL-RICH. THE MEMBER STATES ARE ABU DHABI, AJMAN, DUBAI, FUJAIRAH, RAS-AL-KHAIMAH, SHARJAH, & UMM-AL-QIWAIN. A FAVORITE DESTINATION FOR TOURISTS TO THE ARABIAN PENINSULAR, THE (UAE) IS NOTABLE FOR ITS LARGE POPULATION OF GUEST EX-PATRIOT WORKERS, MANY FROM INDIA AND PAKISTAN, AND ITS GENERALLY PROGRESSIVE ATTITUDE TOWARD WOMEN. THE (UAE) COVERS AN AREA OF 83,600 SQ KM AND ITS CAPITAL CITY IS ABU DHABI. THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGE IS ARABIC.

Dubai can either refer to one of the seven Emirates that constitute the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the eastern Arabian Peninsula, or that Emirate's main city, sometimes called "Dubai city" to distinguish it from the Emirate. The modern Emirate of Dubai was created with the formation of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 1971. However, written accounts documenting the existence of the city have existed at least 150 years prior to the formation of the (UAE). Dubai shares legal, political, military and economic functions with the other emirates within a federal framework, although each Emirate has jurisdiction over some functions such as civic law enforcement and provision and upkeep of local facilities. Dubai has the largest population and is the 2nd largest Emirate by area, after Abu Dhabi. As of 2007, 800 new residents were setting up home in Dubai every day. With Abu Dhabi, it is 1 of only 2 Emirates to possess veto power over critical matters of national importance in the (UAE). Dubai has been ruled by the Al Maktoum dynasty since 1833. The city's current ruler, Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum is also the Vice President and Prime Minister of the (UAE).

Revenues from petroleum and natural gas contribute to <3% of Dubai's US$ 46 billion economy (2006). A majority of the Emirate's revenues are from the Jebel Ali free zone (JAFZ) and, increasingly, from tourism and other service businesses. Dubai has attracted world wide attention through innovative real estate projects and sports events. However, this increased attention, coinciding with its emergence as a world business hub, has also highlighted human rights issues concerning its largely foreign workforce.

Dubai is the fastest growing city and tourism destination in the World. In the past 2 decades, Dubai has emerged as a regional business hub and trade destination with a massive geographical reach from West Africa across the entire Middle East and through to Central Asia. Dubai is the place to do business in the region. The city itself boasts population growth estimated at >30,000 new residents a month and this has contributed to hundreds of billions of dollars of investment in infrastructure and property development. The city is a fascinating place where the modern and traditional stand side by side. Dubai offers some of the worlds best shopping, golf courses, beaches, fantastic hotels and bustling souks, all combining to make this one of the world's most exciting cities.

Visa Regulations:
Nationals of the following countries will be issued, free of charge, with an entry visa valid for 60 days at the passport control:
Citizens of the Arab Gulf Cooperation Council (AGCC) member states: Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, and Saudi Arabia (AGCC) expatriate residents who meet certain conditions.

National citizens of the following countries:
Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Monaco, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom (except the British overseas citizens), United States, Vatican City.

It should be noted that this list may vary slightly from time to time and it is therefore best to check with your local (UAE) embassy or the airline you are using to fly to the (UAE).

Other nationalities are solely responsible for obtaining visas for themselves, their representatives and invitees. Visas can be arranged through the exhibitor's hotel, in Dubai provided sufficient time is given for the application to be processed.

The Organizers are not in a position to sponsor visa applications.

The visit visa does not entitle the visitor to take up permanent work in the (UAE).

At the time of going to press the (UAE) do not grant visas to Israeli Nationals or to holders of passports containing a visa, valid or expired, for Israel. Exhibitors should check with their Travel Agent.

All Visitors and Exhibitors require a full passport for their visit.

Health Requirements:
No health certificates are required for entry to the Emirates, except for visitors who have been in cholera or yellow fever infected area. However, it is always wise to check health requirements before departure as restrictions may vary.

Customs:
Personal effects entering Dubai are not liable to a customs levy. It is forbidden to import drugs and pornographic items.

The importation of alcohol into the (UAE) is only permitted as part of the duty free allowance for personal consumption.

Four items of alcohol per person is the permitted allowance.

Local Information:
To make the most of your time in Dubai, it's worth knowing a little about the locality. The following gives you some useful information about the language, climate, local time and public holidays.

Language:
The official language of the country is Arabic, although English is the official business language. English is widely used and most road and shop signs, restaurant menus, etc., are in both languages.

Climate:
Dubai has a sub-tropical, arid climate. May - October are the warmest months with temperatures reaching the high 40's and high humidity, the rest of the year, temperatures fall anywhere between the mid 20's - 30's. Rainfall is infrequent, falling mainly in the cooler months around November to March.

Local Time:
The (UAE) is four hours ahead of (GMT). There is no summer time saving when clocks are altered.

Public Holidays:
The Islamic year is called the Hijri and dates are followed by AH - After Hijra. The Hijri calendar is based on lunar months. There are 354 or 355 days in the Hijri year, which is divided into 12 lunar months and each year is 11 days shorter than the Gregorian year.

As some holidays are based on the sighting of the moon and not fixed dates on the Hijri calendar, the dates of Islamic holidays are imprecise, with holidays frequently being confirmed <24 hours in advance. Some non-religious holidays are fixed according to the Gregorian calendar.

Local Culture:
If you're spending time in Dubai, it helps to know some basics about the local culture. Here are some handy tips with regard to business and social hours and the all-important etiquette for tipping and photography.

Local Culture:
Dubai's culture is firmly rooted in the Islamic traditions of Arabia. However, Dubai is very tolerant of the customs of its visitors and is relatively liberal when it comes to European dress codes and serving alcohol in hotels. Among the most highly prized virtues are courtesy and hospitality, visitors are sure to be charmed by the genuine warmth and friendliness of the people.

Religion:
Islam is the official religion of the (UAE), but other religions are respected. Dubai has a variety of Christian churches.

Business Hours & Social Hours:
Social hours are very Mediterranean in style: - in general, people get up early, often have an afternoon siesta and eat late in the evening. Government offices are open from 07:30 to 14:00 hrs Saturday to Wednesday. In the private sector, office hours vary between split shift days or straight shifts.

Although the small shops opening hours are usually based on split shift timings, the big shopping malls now remain open all day from 10:00 - 21:00 hrs. Petrol stations are open 24 hours. Embassies and consulates open from 08:00 - 13:30 hrs. Most close on Thursday and Friday.

Tipping:
Tipping practices are similar to most parts of the world. An increasing number of restaurants include service.

Photography:
Normal tourist photography is acceptable; it is courteous to ask permission before photographing people, especially local women. In general, photographs of government buildings, military installations, ports and airports should not be taken.

Things to See & Do:

There's plenty to do in Dubai and it helps to know what's on and where.

Shopping:
The shopping Capital of the Middle East!

Prices are competitive in many products from gold to carpets, textiles or designer labels. The key to shopping here is to bargain where possible since prices, especially in the souks, can drop quite substantially. The attractive and often imaginatively designed, modern shopping malls in Dubai are one of the highlights of shopping in Dubai and are generally spacious and fully air conditioned. Most international brands and high street shops can be found in the shopping malls.

Most malls have a food court, which offers a variety of types of cuisine. Some malls also have cinemas.

Souks:
There are many companies in Dubai offering an exciting variety of city and safari tours. An organized tour can be a great way to discover the (UAE). Tours range from a half-day city tour to an overnight safari visiting the desert or mountains and camping in tents. Dubai's souks are worth a visit for their bustling atmosphere, the eclectic variety of goods and the traditional way of doing business.

Tours & Sightseeing:
There are many companies in Dubai offering an exciting variety of city and safari tours. An organized tour can be a great way to discover the (UAE). Tours range from a half-day city tour to an overnight safari visiting the desert or mountains and camping in tents. Most trips require a minimum of 4 people for the tour to run. It is advisable to book 3 or 4 days in advance although in some cases less notice is not a problem.

For more information contact the Recommended Travel Agents.

Activities:
There are numerous activities available to visitors to Dubai including water sports and golf packages.

For more information contact the Recommended Travel Agents.

Nightlife:
Dubai has numerous cinemas, cafes, bars, nightclubs and discos to suit all tastes and ages. There are a number of local magazines available from the Newsagents listing details of the above facilities.

OCTOBER 1985: EMIRATES (EAD) FLEW ITS 1ST ROUTES OUT OF DUBAI WITH JUST 2 AIRPLANES: A LEASED 737 AND AN A300B4.

JUNE 1992: 7/7 ORDERS ($2 BILLION) 777'S (19/16 ORDERS, $400 MILLION ROLLS ROYCE (RR) (TRENT 800), 1ST 3 "A" MARKET DUBAI TO (LHR), REST "B" MARKET, DUBAI TO (TYO).

JUNE 1993: 1992 = +124.4% (RPK) TRAFFIC, +121.5% PASSENGERS (PAX), +128.3% (FTK) FREIGHT TRAFFIC.

JANUARY 1994: 1993 = +$24.4 MILLION (NET PROFIT): +23% PASSENGERS (PAX).

MARCH 1994: 1 ORDER (MARCH 1995) A300-600B4-605, (ILF) 7 YEAR LEASED, & 1 ORDER (AUGUST 1994) A310-300, GATX LEASED.

JANUARY 1995: 1994 = +$25.9 MILLION: +12% PASSENGERS (PAX), +25% (FTK) FREIGHT TRAFFIC.

MAY 1995: 2 727-200'S SOLD TO QATAR AIRWAYS (QTA). 10TH A310-300, 10F, 32C, 131Y PAX.

JUNE 1995: 1ST 3 777-200'S (RR) (TRENT 877), 4 "B" MARKET (RR) (TRENT 890, 90,000 LB THRUST), 632,500 LB (MTOGW).

JULY 1995: FISCAL YEAR (FY) 1994 = +$39.7 MILLION (+23.9%).

NOVEMBER 1995: 2/WEEK DUBAI TO HO CHI MINH CITY & NAIROBI (A310-300, 3 CLASS) (NOW 38 DESTINATIONS).

JANUARY 1996: 1995 = +10.7% RPK, +11.1% PAX, +14.8% FTK.

MARCH 1996: (http://www.ekgroup.com).

MUTUAL ASSISTANCE AGREEMENT WITH (CAT), & (SAA) + POSSIBLY (SIA), TO SHARE RESOURCES, PEOPLE, & EXPERTISE, IF EITHER EXPERIENCES ANY EMERGENCY, AWAY FROM THEIR HOME BASE.

APRIL 1996: NEW ROUTE TO ATHENS (39TH DESTINATION, & 11TH IN EUROPE). ALSO, TO MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA.

FISCAL YEAR (FY) 1995 = +$22 MILLION (+$26 MILLION): +14% PAX, +20% FTK. GROUP = $39 MILLION.

MAY 1996: DUBAI TO ATHENS TO FRANKFURT (A300-600R OR A310-300). TO MELBOURNE NONSTOP, WITH 777-200. ALSO, 777 TO SINGAPORE AND LONDON HEATHROW (LHR).

POSSIBLE +16 767-300ER'S.

JULY 1996: 777 DELIVERY. NEGOTIATIONS FOR 16 A330'S.

AUGUST 1996: NEW BOEING SPARES DISTRIBUTION CENTER TO BE CONSTRUCTED IN DUBAI. CONSTRUCTION STARTED ON NEW HANGAR, & ENGINEERING FACILITY.

OCTOBER 1996: ADEL AL-REDHA, MANAGER ENGINEERING, 1 YEAR ABSENCE, TO ATTEND CRANFIELD COLLEGE IN ENGLAND, TO COMPLETE HIS MASTERS DEGREE. DURING HIS ABSENCE, BEN OTHMAN, MANAGER ENGINEERING PROJECTS (ACTING).

NEW ROUTE KUALA LUMPUR, TO SANAA (YEMEN) (A300-600R) (NOW TO 35 COUNTRIES). CODE SHARE WITH SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA), TO NAIROBI & JOHANNESBURG.

INCREASED FREQUENCY BECAUSE +94% TRAFFIC, IN 1ST 6 MONTHS OF 1996.

3RD 777 (WA198) DELIVERY.

NOVEMBER 1996: THE 777'S ARE FLYING TO BANGKOK, MANILA, HONG HONG, KARACHI, AND JEDDAH.

AIRBUS WILL ASSIST WITH SALE OF 16 A300-600'S, & A310'S. $2 BILLION, 16/7 ORDERS A330-200'S.

JANUARY 1997: MANDATORY RETIREMENT OF MANAGERS IS 55 YEARS.

1996 = 5.340 BILLION (RPK) TRAFFIC (#49 HIGHEST IN WORLD).

3RD 777 DELIVERY. UPGRADES BUSINESS CLASS ON A300-600R'S, & A310-
300'S, BY INCREASING SEAT PITCH, FROM 40 INCHES, TO 52 INCHES.

MARCH 1997: SELECTS (RR) (TRENT 700) FOR 16/7 ORDERS A330'S.

APRIL 1997: TO DAR ES SALAAM, TANZANIA (A310-300).

MAY 1997: PLANS FOR $54.5 MILLION, 125,000 SQ M, 3-BAY, MAINTENANCE HANGAR, AT DUBAI, BY SEPTEMBER 1997.

777 EXTENDED TWIN ENGINE OPERATIONS (ETOPS) HALTED UNTIL AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVE (AD) ACCOMPLISHED FOR ENGINE REDESIGNED PARTS DUE TO 10 OIL LOSS AND 1 BEARING FAILURE INCIDENTS OF (RR) (TRENT 800) ENGINES.

GERMAN MAGAZINE "GLOBO" NAMES (EAD) "1997 AIRLINE OF THE YEAR."

CATEGORY III NAVIGATIONAL AIDS, INSTALLED AT DUBAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT.

TO BAKU, AZERBAIJAN (A300-600) (1ST ROUTE TO (CIS).

INTRODUCTION OF 777 INCREASED CAPACITY TO SINGAPORE 23%, JAKARTA 50%, AND COLOMBO 36% ASK WITH 49C, 304Y PAX. +2 777'S IN SEPTEMBER 1997. 777-200 IDG DELIVERY. INTEREST SHOWN IN 777-200X/300X. RETURNS A310-304 TO AIRBUS (EDS), AS PART OF NEW 16/7 ORDERS A330'S DEAL.

JUNE 1997: CONVERTS INTERIOR CONFIGURATION OF 777'S FROM 3 CLASS TO 2 CLASS.

COMMENCES 120 MINUTES (ETOPS) WITH 777'S ON COLOMBO, SINGAPORE, AND TO MELBOURNE.

JULY 1997: FISCAL YEAR (FY) 1996 = +$30.4 MILLION (+38%) DESPITE $13.6 MILLION FOR FUEL COSTS, 3 MILLION PAX +17% PAX, +24% (ASK) (CAPACITY), +23% (FTK), 69% LF (LOAD FACTOR).

AUGUST 1997: CODE SHARE WITH UNITED AIRLINES (UAL), TO USA, AND LONDON.

EXERCISES 2 OPTIONS 777-200'S IGW. 6 NOW IN OPERATIONS, 7TH IN SEPTEMBER 1997. 777 TO ROME, NICE & MALE. 777 NOW TO 19 CITIES.

SEPTEMBER 1997: DUBAI - DAR ES SALAAM, DUBAI - NAIROBI - DAR ES SALAAM (A310-300).

7TH 777-21H IGW (TRENT 890B) DELIVERY.

OCTOBER 1997: ADEL AL-REDHA, FORMERLY MANAGER ENGINEERING PROJECTS, RETURNED FROM CRANFIELD UNIVERSITY, WHERE HE OBTAINED HIS MASTERS IN AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING, - NOW PROMOTED TO GENERAL MANAGER ENGINEERING (SUPPORT SERVICES).

CODE SHARE WITH QANTAS (QAN), TO MELBOURNE.

4,270 EMPLOYEES.

AFTER 8 YEARS EXTENDED TWIN-ENGINE OPERATIONS (ETOPS) EXPERIENCE ON AIRBUS AIRPLANES, NOW HAS 120 MINUTES (ETOPS) ON 777-200'S (TYPICAL ROUTES: (DXB) - (CMB) - (SIN), (DXB) - (SIN) - (MEL).

NOVEMBER 1997: 777 NOW FLIES TO ABU DHABI, ATHENS, CAIRO, COLOMBO, BANGKOK, DOHA, DHAKA, DUBAI, FRANKFURT, HONG KONG, JEDDAH, JAKARTA, KUALA LUMPUR, KARACHI, LONDON, MANILA, MALE, MUSCAT, MELBOURNE, NICE, ROME, RIYADH, AND SINGAPORE.

DECEMBER 1997: LETTER OF INTENT (LOI) 6/6 A340-500'S (ONE OF LAUNCH CUSTOMERS).

JANUARY 1998: 1997 = +$76M (+$53M), DUE TO HIGH TRAFFIC GROWTH.

BIDDING FOR 40% SRILANKAN (LNK). LOOKS LIKE FAVORITE OF 7 AIRLINES.

TO MALTA (A300-600R, 18F, 35C, 163Y).

MARCH 1998: "EXECUTIVE TRAVEL" MAGAZINE ELECTS EMIRATES (EAD) "AIRLINE OF YEAR 1997" 1ST PLACE AHEAD OF SINGAPORE AIRLINES (SIA), & BRITISH AIRWAYS (BAB). ALSO, VOTES (EAD) "BEST AIRLINE TO THE MIDDLE EAST;" "BEST ECONOMY CLASS;" "BEST CABIN STAFF;" & "BEST IN-FLIGHT FOOD & WINE."

POSSIBLE 40% SRILANKAN (LNK) PURCHASE. ACQUIRES 40% OF SRILANKAN (LNK) FOR $75M, OVER TWO PHASES.

ATHENS - MALTA (A300).

OPERATIONAL, & INTERNAL, AUDIT, CONTRACTED TO BRITISH CONSULTING GROUP, "AVIATION SPEEDWING," TO TAKE 6 MONTHS, & RESULTS GIVEN TO TOP MANAGEMENT.

APRIL 1998: BRIAN CAMP, GENERAL MANAGER ENGINEERING SERVICES, RETIRES. CHRIS VAN ZYL, GENERAL MANAGER ENGINEERING SERVICES, EX-SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA).

HAS OK TO FLY TO MOSCOW.

4,540 EMPLOYEES.

JUNE 1998: 1ST "C" CHECKS ON 777'S (WA196; WA197).

PLANS SERVICE TO MOSCOW.

JULY 1998: FISCAL YEAR (FY) 1997 = +$102M: 11.01B RPK PASSENGER TRAFFIC (+28.2%), 69.3% LF (LOAD FACTOR).

IN 10/98, TO MELBOURNE, VIA SINGAPORE (777). TO PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN (A310-300).

7 777'S 120 MINUTES (ETOPS) FLIGHTS/MONTH (TOTAL) = 97 (1,620) OVER INDIAN OCEAN.

SEPTEMBER 1998: IN 1/99, TO ISLAMABAD, & LAHORE, PAKISTAN (A310-300), FOR TOTAL 47 DESTINATIONS.

ADEL AL-REDHA, GENERAL MANAGER ENGINEERING (AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE), REPLACES STEVE BROWN, NOW SENIOR REPRESENTATIVE, AT AIRBUS.

FARNBOROUGH AIR SHOW ANNOUNCEMENT OF 2 ORDERS 777-300'S, 1 ORDER A330-200, $2.4B, 6/10 ORDERS A340-500'S (TRENT 553), FOR 1ST NONSTOP TO US WEST COAST, & AUSTRALIA, 280 PAX, 3 CLASS.

OCTOBER 1998: ACQUIRES "MEDLINK", PHOENIX, SYSTEM (1ST IN MIDDLE EAST TO OFFER 24-HOUR AIR-TO-GROUND MEDICAL ASSISTANCE).

CODE SHARE WITH BRITISH AIRWAYS (BAB), DUBAI, AND ABU DHABI, TO LONDON HEATHROW, & MANCHESTER.

1ST 6 MONTHS = 5.9B RPK (+16.8%), 376M FTK (+21.3%), 1.9M PAX (+15.1%).

7 777'S (ETOPS) 120 MINUTES FLIGHTS/MONTH (TOTAL FLIGHTS): INDIAN OCEAN, INDONESIA 137 (2,010).

8TH 777 DELIVERY.

NOVEMBER 1998: 9TH 777-21H IGW DELIVERY (176-29325).

DECEMBER 1998: 2 A300-600'S, LEASED TO TUNIS AIR (TUN), FOR 2 YEARS.

JANUARY 1999: TO MALTA (A310-300, 178 PAX).

FEBRUARY 1999: PROJECTS FISCAL YEAR (FY) 1998 = +$109.3M RECORD (+$101M).

TO 47 CITIES.

"OFFICIAL AIRLINE GUIDE (OAG) WORLDWIDE" NAMES EMIRATES (EAD) "1998 OVERALL BEST AIRLINE" WITH SINGAPORE (SIA) 2ND, & AIR CANADA (ACN) 3RD. ALSO, "BEST MIDDLE EASTERN," & "BEST INDIAN SUB-CONTINENT AIRLINE."

MARCH 1999: EMIRATES (EAD) SKY CARGO (EMC), EXTENDS WET-LEASE OF ATLAS (TLS) 747-200F. 1ST A330-200 (TRENT 700), 34 BUSINESS (C), 251 ECONOMY (Y). LATER AIRPLANES WILL HAVE 3 CLASS, 243 PAX. IN 1999, WILL RECEIVE 4 MORE A330-200'S, TO REPLACE A300 & A310, AND 2 777-300'S.

APRIL 1999: CODE SHARE WITH AIR LANKA (LNK), COLOMBO, TO SINGAPORE, & COLOMBO - JAKARTA. NEW ROUTE TO ZURICH, VIA ISTANBUL (A310-300). NONSTOP TO NAIROBI.

4,978 EMPLOYEES. (http://www.ekgroup.com).

MAY 1999: IN 11/99, TO MUNICH (48TH DESTINATION) (A310-300, 18C, 177Y PAX).

AHMED AL-MULLA, DIRECTOR ENGINEERING & OPERATIONS. ADEL AL-REDHA, SENIOR GENERAL MANAGER PROCUREMENT & LOGISTICS.

JUNE 1999: EMIRATES (EAD) GROUP, INCLUDING GROUND-HANDLING & TRAVEL GROUP FISCAL YEAR (FY) 1998 = +$117M (+15.6%). EMIRATES (EAD) AIRLINE 1998 = +$85M (+19.3%): 8.07B RPM (+17.8%), 1.40B FTM (+15.4%).

1998 TOP WORLD AIRLINES TRAFFIC RPM (B):
35 SAA 9.85; 36 SAB 9.53; 37 BEJ 9.07; 38 JAS 8.77; 39 THY 8.10; 40 EAD 8.07; 41 AIN 7.68; 42 ELA 7.55; 43 GIA 7.09; 44 PIA 6.82.

PARIS AIR SHOW - 1 ORDER (09/00) 777-300 (TRENT 892) (28680), (ILF) 10 YEAR LEASED. 1 ORDER A330-200 (10/00).

JULY 1999: AHMED AL MULLA, DIRECTOR ENGINEERING & FLIGHT OPERATIONS. DON FOSTER, DIRECTOR SERVICE DELIVERY.

A300-600R (505) RETURNED TO (AIFS), LEASED TO SUDAN AIRWAYS (SUD). A310-300 RETURNED TO AIRBUS, ALL BEING PHASED OUT, AS A330-200'S ARRIVE. A330-243 (283, A6-EKS; 293, A6-EKT) DELIVERIES.

SEPTEMBER 1999: 1ST 8 MONTHS = 10.14B RPK (+21.9%), 607M FTK (+21.2%), 3.05M PAX (+14.5%).

OPERATES TO JOHANNESBURG, COMOROS ISLANDS, COLOMBO, KARACHI, LAHORE, DELHI, DHAKA, AND BOMBAY (MUMBAI).

A310-308 (573), RETURNED TO (GAX), LEASED TO ROYAL JORDANIAN (RJA). 4TH A330-243 DELIVERY.

OCTOBER 1999: IN 3/00, TO SYDNEY, VIA SINGAPORE (A330-200).

NOVEMBER 1999: IN 3/00, TO ENTEBBE, UGANDA. ALREADY FLIES TO CAIRO, JOHANNESBURG, NAIROBI, & DAR ES SALAAM (A330-200). TO MUNICH, & STOCKHOLM.

BRITISH "DAILY TELEGRAPH" NEWSPAPER, VOTES EMIRATES (EAD) "BEST INTERNATIONAL AIRLINE."

EMIRATES SKY CARGO (EMC) AT: (http://www.skycargo.com).

1ST 777-31H (256-29062, A6-EMM) DELIVERY. 1 ORDER (3/01) 777-300ER (TRENT 892) (29395), (ILF) 10 YEAR LEASED. 777-300 ON STATIC DISPLAY AT DUBAI AIR SHOW.

DECEMBER 1999: 10 FLIGHTS/WEEK TO BAHRAIN (49TH DESTINATION).

2ND 777-31H (262-29063, A6-EMN), SALE (SIL) LEASED.

JANUARY 2000: TO BANGKOK (777).

IN 2000, NEW TERMINAL, AT DUBAI INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, COSTING $500M (2ND WITHIN 3 TO 5 YEARS, FOR HANDLING 50M PASSENGERS BY 2015).

2 A330-243'S (314, A6-EKV; 316, A6-EKW) DELIVERY.

FEBRUARY 2000: 5,562 EMPLOYEES.

"AIR TRANSPORT WORLD" MAGAZINE AWARDS EMIRATES (EAD) SKY CARGO (EMC), "BEST AIR CARGO DEVELOPMENT."

IN 4/00, TO MILAN (A330-200, 2 CLASS).

A300B4-605R (563) RETURNED TO AIRBUS.

MARCH 2000: 1999 = 15.32B RPK (+18%); 994M FTK (+24.7%); 4.54M PAX (+11.9%); +22.9% ASK; 71.9% LF (-2.5); +$87M (+2%).

TO SINGAPORE - SYDNEY (A330, 3/WEEK). TO NAIROBI - ENTEBBE (A330, 3/WEEK).

2 A330-243'S (326, A6-EKX; 328) DELIVERIES.

APRIL 2000: IN 9/99, CODE SHARE WITH PHILIPPINE AIRLINES (PAL), TO MANILA. TO MILAN (52ND DESTINATION).

4,978 EMPLOYEES.

(http://www.ekgroup.com/pageair.asp).

(media.relations@emirates.com).

STEVE BROWN, GENERAL MANAGER AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE TO RETIRE 9/00.

LETTER OF INTENT (LOI) 7 ORDERS 777-200X/-300X'S. A300B4-605R (563, A6-EKE), LEASED TO TUNISAIR (TUN).

MAY 2000: A310-304 (CF6-80C2) (600), RETURNED TO AIRBUS, LEASED TO KENYA (KEN). ANNOUNCES EMIRATES AIRLINES (EAD) WILL BE LAUNCH CUSTOMER FOR 5/5 ORDERS A380'S, 550 PAX ($216M EACH) (2/06), INCLUDING 2 FREIGHTERS A380-100F'S.

JUNE 2000: ADEL AL-REDHA, HEAD OF ENGINEERING, REPLACES IFTIKHAR MIR, WHO RETIRED. KEN WILDING, MANAGER OF NEW MAINTENANCE CONTROL CENTER (MCC), WHICH COORDINATES, MONITORS, AND TRACKS, MAINTENANCE TRENDS OF ALL (EAD) AIRPLANES. GARY JONES, MANAGER OUTSTATION MAINTENANCE. AKHTAR MAHMUD, MANAGER OVERHAUL WORKSHOP, RETIRED.

JULY 2000: IN 9/00, TO CHENNAI (MADRAS) (A310-300, 3-CLASS, 4 NONSTOPS/WEEK), CODE SHARE WITH AIR INDIA (AIN). IN 12/00, TO BIRMINGHAM, UK (A330-200, 2 CLASS, DAILY NONSTOP).

LETTER OF INTENT (LOI) +6 ORDERS (2/03) 777-300'S. +3 ORDERS A330-200'S FOR TOTAL 21.

AUGUST 2000: IN 9/00, CODE SHARE WITH DEUTSCH BA (DBA), TO MUNICH.

FISCAL YEAR (FY) 1999 = +$87.1M (+$85.2M): 15.32B RPK (+18%); 71.9% LF; 994.83M FTK (+24.7%); 4.54M PAX (+11.9%); 6,524 EMPLOYEES (+15.4%).

(http://www.emirates.com).

6 A310-304'S (545; 588; 597; 600; 658; 667), EX-(EAD), SOLD TO AIR TRANSAT (AIJ).

SEPTEMBER 2000: IAIN LACHLAN, GENERAL MANAGER BASE MAINTENANCE, EX-DIRECTOR ENGINEERING BRITISH MIDLAND (BMA). MALCOLM BROWN, LINE MAINTENANCE MANAGER. KEITH CARTER, OVERHAUL WORKSHOPS MANAGER.

IN 12/00, TO BIRMINGHAM, UK (A330-200).

777-31H (A6-EMO) DELIVERY. EXERCISED 3 OPTIONS A330-200'S, TO FIRM ORDERS.

OCTOBER 2000: A330-243 (345, A6-EKZ) DELIVERY.

NOVEMBER 2000: CODE SHARE WITH AIR INDIA (AIN), TO CHENNAI.

A300-600R (747) RETURNED TO AIRBUS (AIFS), TO BE LEASED TO MIDDLE EAST AIRLINES (MEA), IN 4/01. 1 A310-304 (436) SOLD TO IRAN AIR (IRN). 2 A330-243'S (348, AC-EAA; 365, AC-EAB) DELIVERIES.

DECEMBER 2000: IN 3/01, TO DUSSELDORF (4TH DESTINATION IN GERMANY, AND 55TH IN WHOLE NETWORK) (A310-300). CODE SHARE WITH DEUTSCH BA (DBA), TO MUNICH - BERLIN/COLOGNE/DUSSELDORF. TO MAHE (A330, 3/WEEK).

6 ORDERS (4/02) 777-300ER'S, (ILF) 10 YEAR LEASED. 11TH A330-243 DELIVERY, (348, A6-EAA).

JANUARY 2001: IN 3/01, TO MALTA, AND TRIPOLI.

MAINTENANCE CONTROL, IS NOW USING AUTOMATED PROGRAM, THAT FORMULATES DOWNLINKED FAULT DATA, INTO MESSAGE/FAULT CATEGORIES, IN REAL TIME, FOR PRE-PLANNING MAINTENANCE ACTIONS, AT THE NEXT DESTINATION. SHOWS IMPROVEMENTS IN PROCEDURES, FOR CREW RESPONSES TO STATUS MESSAGES, OCCURRING AFTER PUSHBACK, WHICH AVOID MANY RETURN-TO-GATE SITUATIONS. BOTH STEPS HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO IMPROVED DISPATCH RELIABILITY.

TOP WORLD AIRLINES 2000 TRAFFIC RPM (B):
27 CHI 16.14; 28 SAS 14.07; 29 ANZ 13.81; 30 SVA 12.57; 31 EAD 12.06; 32 SAB 12.04; 33 SAA 12.01; 34 ASA 12.0.

1 747-47UF (1192-29261, N408MC), ATLAS (TLS) WET-LEASED, REPLACES 747-200F (TLS) LEASED. 2 A330-243'S (365, AC-EAB; 372, AC-EAC) DELIVERIES.

MARCH 2001: 2000 = 19.41B RPK (+26.7%), 1.29B FTK (+29.5%), 5.49M PAX (+20.9%).

TO DUSSELDORF (A310-300).

777-300 (A6-EMP) DELIVERY, (ILF) LEASED. 1 A300B4-605R (608) SOLD TO LUFTHANSA (DLH). 1 A330-243 (392, A6-EAF) DELIVERY.

APRIL 2001: 6,524 EMPLOYEES.

1 A330-243 (396, A6-EAG) DELIVERY.

MAY 2001: IN 7/01, TO HYDERABAD (A330-200, 8/WEEK).

2000 FISCAL YEAR (FY) = +$145M (+$116.8M) (+40.2%): 5.7M PAX (+19.8%); 335K TONNES FTK (+24.2%); 75.1% LF (+3.2).

JUNE 2001: 1 A330-243 (409, A6-EAH) DELIVERY.

JULY 2001: SITA: DXBCAEK.

1 777-31H, SALE (SIL) LEASED.

AUGUST 2001: 2 ORDERS (7/02) A330-200'S (ALREADY LARGEST CUSTOMER OF A330).

SEPTEMBER 2001: IN 10/01, TO PERTH, AUSTRALIA (777-200ER, 4/WEEK).

OCTOBER 2001: TOP WORLD AIRLINES 1ST 9 MONTHS TRAFFIC RPK (B):
19 AMW 24.20; 20 VAR 19.81; 21 CHI 19.70; 22 SAS 18.17; 23 EAD 17.59; 24 ANA 15.31; 25 ASA 15.31.

NOVEMBER 2001: IN 2002, 5 NEW NONSTOPS, TO PERTH AND OSAKA (777, 4/WEEK), + KHARTOUM (SUDAN), MAURITIUS, AND CASABLANCA (A330, 3/WEEK).

LAST 6 MONTHS = +$46M (+$45M).

STARTS 1ST 3RD PARTY MAINTENANCE, A "4C" CHECK ON LAUDA (LAL) 777. NEW CONTRACTS FOR BALAIR (BCT) 757 LINE MAINTENANCE, MALAYSIA (MAS) A330, AND AIRTOURS (GUE) + AIR 2000 (ATZ) 767 LINE MAINTENANCE TECHNICAL HANDLING.

LETTER OF INTENT (LOI) $6.6B, 33 ORDERS 777'S, AND $8.4B, 22/10 A380'S, 3 OPTIONS A330'S, AND 8 OPTIONS A340-600'S. ALL THESE ORDERS, WERE ANNOUNCED AT THE DUBAI AIR SHOW. SERIOUSLY CONSIDERING BECOMING LAUNCH CUSTOMER FOR BOEING SONIC CRUISER. A330-243 (437, A6-EAI) DELIVERY.

DECEMBER 2001: COMPLETES "4C" CHECK, ON LAUDA (LAL) 777.

JANUARY 2002: IN 8/02, TO PERTH.

2001 TOP 50 WORLD AIRLINES - TRAFFIC B RPM
1 UAL 116.60; 2 AAL 106.15; 3 DAL 97.60; 4 NWA 73.11; 5 BAB 64.24; 6 AFA 59.54; 7 CAL 58.76; 8 DLH 56.76; 9 JAL 50.77; 10 USA 45.93; 11 SWA 44.50; 12 SIA 42.76; 13 QAN 42.14; 14 ACN 41.49; 15 KLM 35.76; 16 ANA 33.16; 17 CAT 27.81; 18 TII 27.43; 19 IBE 25.64; 20 KAL 23.73; 21 ALI 22.45; 22 MAS 22.29; 23 AMW 19.06; 24 VAA 17.65; 25 VAR 16.02; 26 CHI 16.00; 27 EAD 14.37; 28 SAS 14.26; 29 ANZ 13.54; 30 SAA 12.70; 31 SVA 12.56; 32 BEJ 12.39; 33 ASA 12.23; 34 JAS 10.06; 35 THY 9.35; 36 AMX 8.51; 37 PAL 8.36; 38 GIA 8.15; 39 CMA 7.99; 40 ELA 7.79; 41 GUL 7.65; 42 PIA 7.24; 43 AIN 7.10; 44 TAP 6.43; 45 EGP 5.53; 46 OLY 5.24; 47 AUL 5.06; 48 FIN 4.93; 49 IND 4.52; 50 CQT 4.51.

20TH A330-243 DELIVERY 451 (A6-EAJ). BY END OF 2002, WILL HAVE 25 A330'S, & 18 777'S.

FEBRUARY 2002: 1 A330-200 (A6-EAK) DELIVERY.

MARCH 2002: MEMO OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) TO BUY 2 VERSIONS OF ENGINE ALLIANCE'S (GP7000), FOR ITS A380'S: GP7270'S RATED AT 70,000 LBS THRUST, FOR 20 PAX VERSIONS AND (GP7277)'S 76,500 LBS FOR 2 FREIGHTERS. THE "ENGINE ALLIANCE," INCLUDING (P&W) RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE (GP7200)'S, LOW-PRESSURE COMPRESSOR, LOW-PRESSURE TURBINE, AND ACCESSORY GEARBOX MODULES; WITH (GE) RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ENGINE CORE (INCLUDING HIGH-PRESSURE COMPRESSOR, TURBINE, AND COMBUSTOR) AND CONTROL SYSTEM MODULES. AIR FRANCE (AFA) ALSO HAS (GP7200)'S. ALLIANCE PLANS, FOR (FAA)/(JAA) CERTIFICATION IN MID 2005, WITH 1ST A380 FLIGHT, IN 1/06.

(TELEPHONE: (4) 295 11 11). (FAX: (4) 343 04 27).

TO CASABLANCA (NONSTOP, 3/WEEK).

22ND A330-200 (A6-EAL) DELIVERY.

APRIL 2002: 7,996 EMPLOYEES.

TOP WORLD AIRLINES 2001 (PAX TRAFFIC - B RPK):
18 KAL 37.95; 19 ALI 36.52; 20 AMW 30.69; 21 VAR 26.01; 22 CHI 25.06; 23 SAS 23.30; 24 EAD 23.13; 25 GUN 22.77.

TO KHARTOUM (SUDAN) (A330-200, 3/WEEK).

IN 9/02, EMIRATES SKYCARGO TO SHANGHAI (WEEKLY).

(http://www.sky-cargo.com).

A310-308 (658) SOLD TO AIR TRANSAT (AIJ).

MAY 2002: FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2001 = +$127.47M (+11%) (+$114.84M): 23.13B RPK PASSENGER TRAFFIC (+19.1%); 6.43M PAX PASSENGERS (+17.1%); 74.3% LF LOAD FACTOR (+.8); 400K TONNES CARGO (+19.5%); 1.50B FTK FREIGHT TRAFFIC (+16.1%); 7,996 EMPLOYEES (+5.6%).

777-31H (402-29296, A6-EMR), (ILF) LEASED.

JUNE 2002: A300B4-605R (701) SOLD TO LUFTHANSA (DLH). +2 ORDERS A330-200's, FOR TOTAL 29 ORDERS, WITH 22 IN CURRENT OPERATION.

July 2002: In 8/02, to Mauritius (A330-200, 3/week).

August 2002: $3.3B expansion, of the Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Fujairah airports, in the (UAE), Kuwait's Airspace System, and a new terminal, at the International Airport, in Muscat.

September 2002: Emirates (EAD) Skycargo (EMC), to Shanghai (weekly). Code share with Japan Air Lines (JAL), to Osaka (Kanzai) (EAD) 777-200, (4/week).

A310-308 (695) returned to Airbus. 2 A330-243's (491, A6-EAM; 494, A6-EAN) deliveries.

October 2002: 1st 9 months = 21.65B RPK passenger traffic (+23.1%); 6.01M PAX passengers (+22.9%); 1.36B FTK freight traffic (+28.6%).

1st 6 months Top World Airlines Traffic B RPK
1 AAL 95.18; 2 UAL 84.56; 3 DAL 74.53; 4 NWA 56.50; 5 BAB 49.30; 6 AFA 48.21; 7 CAL 47.49; 8 DLH 42.06; 9 JAL 39.44; 10 SWA 36.03; 11 SIA 36.00; 12 ACN 33.69; 13 USA 33.06; 14 KLM 27.54; 15 CAT 23.07; 16 IBE 19.53; 17 KAL 16.47; 18 CHI 15.70; 19 AMW 15.20; 20 ALI 14.21; 21 EAD 13.45; 22 VAR 12.68; 23 GUN 12.49; 24 SAS 12.01; 25 BEJ 10.32.

November 2002: Selects (AD OPT)'s crew management solutions - "By demonstrating the ability to deliver a customized, integrated suite of crew management solutions, that balance (EAD)'s needs to optimize productivity, and improve crew member satisfaction, including: Altitude Pairing system; Altitude Preferential Bidding System (PBS); Altitude Manpower Planning System (MPP); and Altitude Vacation Bidding System (VBS) modules, which can be seen on www.ad-opt.com.

In 12/02, to Cochin (3/week). In 6/03, to Chicago (ORD)/(JFK) (A340-500, daily).

Last 6 months end 9/02 = +# DHS 404.2M/+$110M (+# DHS 168.2M) (+140%): +18% ASK; 78% LF (+4); +38% FTK.

Considering 25 orders 777-300ER's.

December 2002: Building $275M, 8-bay maintenance facility, at Dubai for /05, with hangar able to handle A380.

January 2003: In 7/03, Dubai - Moscow (3/week). In 8/03, Dubai - Shanghai (4/week). In 12/03, Dubai - Lagos (3/week).

Mercator, the Info Technology (IT) division of the Emirates Group (EAD), provides its fastrac revenue accounting solution to Air Malawi (AML) and Yemenia (YEM). Mercator recently unveiled Chameleon, its new cargo ground-handling system.

Expects 11 new airplanes to be delivered in 2003, including 1st A340-541 in 9/03, for daily service Dubai - Sydney, while simultaneously launching 777-300 service to Brisbane, via Singapore. A340-541's also to Osaka (4/week) and increase service to London Gatwick (LGW) (3/day). Flights to the USA have been delayed until 2004, with nonstops to New York (JFK) in 4/04, and to San Francisco (SFO) in summer 2004.

February 2003: 777-31H (432-28687, A6-EMV), delivery.

March 2003: 7,996 employees.

A330-243 (525, A6-EAO) delivery.

April 2003: 2 A330-243's (509, A6-EAP; 518, A6-EAQ) deliveries.

May 2003: (EAD) Group 2002 = +# Dhs1.05B/+$285.7M (+74%) (+$164.2M): 30.17B RPK (+30.5%); +28.5% AK; 76.6% LF (+2.3); 8.21M PAX (+27.8%); 1.90B FTK (+27.1%). Cargo represented 19.6% of the airline's revenue.

In 10/03, Dubai - Brisbane (daily). Flights to Sydney will go nonstop (A340-500).

(FAA) Safety Oversight issues a Category 1 rating for the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

World Top 20 Airlines 1st Q Traffic (B) (RPK)
1 (AAL) 44.67; 2 (UAL) 39.66; 3 (DAL) 36.82; 4 (NWA) 26.65; 5 (BAB) 23.31; 6 (AFA) 23.27; 7 (CAL) 21.35; 8 (DLH) 20.62; 9 (SWA) 17.53; 10 (KLM) 14.04; 11 (USA) 13.28; 12 (SIA) 12.20*; 13 (ACN) 9.65*; 14 (CAT) 8.51*; 15 (AMW) 7.84; 16 (QAN)* 7.18; 17 (KAL)* 6.72; 18 (IBE) 6.17*; 19 (EAD) 5.69*; 20 (AAT) 5.42. * 2 months only.

2nd 747-400F delivery. At Paris Air Show, will announce 26 orders 777-300ER's, 10 orders A340-600's, and 23 A380's with leases from ILFC (ILF) and GECAS (GEF).

June 2003: Paris Air Show announcement of $12.5B, FOR 41 Airbus airplanes: including 21 (2/09) A380-800's, 2 (12/03) A340-500's, & 18 (6/07) A340-600HGW's (Trent 556). Also 2 (4/07) A380-800F's (GP7000), (ILF) 15 year leased, 2 (2/08) A340-600's (Trent 556), (ILF) 12 year leased, 12 (3/05) 777-300ER's (GE90-115B) (ILF) 12 year leased, 14 (2/08) 777-300ER's, (GEF). A380 to be operated in 3 different layouts: 533 in 3 classes; 653 in 2 classes; & 500 for nonstop flights between Dubai and Australia.

In 8/03, Dubai - Sydney - Auckland (daily). Dubai - Melbourne - Auckland (daily). In 10/03, Dubai - Brisbane - Auckland (daily).

2002 = +$285.5M (+$164.3M): 31.66B RPK (+30.2%); +26.7% ASK; 76.6% LF (+2.3); 8.5M PAX (+25.7%); 2.13B FTK (+33.2%); 10,507 EMPLOYEES (+20.8%).

2002 TOP 25 WORLD AIRLINES - TRAFFIC - B - RPK
1 (AAL) 195.81; 2 (UAL) 176.15; 3 (DAL) 152.66; 4 (NWA) 115.91; 5 (BAB) 99.71; 6 (AFA) 96.80; 7 (CAL) 95.51; 8 (DLH) GRP 88.57; 9 (JAL) 83.54; 10 (QAN) 75.23; 11 (SWA) 73.05; 12 (SIA) 71.12; 13 (ACN) 69.42; 14 (USA) 69.42; 15 (KLM) 58.89; 16 (ANA) 52.97; 17 (CAT) 49.04; 18 (TII) 48.51; 19 (KAL) 41.80; 20 (IBE) 40.47; 21 (MAS) 36.90; 22 (AMW) 31.98; 23 (SAS) GRP 30.91; 24 (EAD) 30.17; 25 (ALI) 29.84.

2002 TOP 25 WORLD FREIGHT CARRIERS - B - FTK
1 (FED) 13.20; 2 (LUB) 7.16; 3 (UPS) 6.62; 4 (KAL) 6.25; 5 (SIA) 6.08; 6 (AFA) 4.87; 7 (CAT) 4.85; 8 (CHI) 4.60; 9 (JAL) 4.39; 10 (CLX) 4.16; 11 (BAB) 4.12; 12 (KLM) 3.99; 13 (EVA) 3.28; 14 (NWA) 3.24; 15 (AAL) 2.93; 16 (UAL) 2.79; 17 (AAR) 2.75; 18 (NCA) 2.21; 19 (POA) 1.97; 20 (EAD) 1.96; 21 (MAS) 1.92; 22 (BEJ) 1.88; 23 (TII) 1.824; 24 (DAL) 1.823; 25 (ACN) 1.58.

A330-243 (536, A6-EAR) delivery.

July 2003: 5,000 employees.

In 2002, Emirates (EAD) SkyCargo grew +31%.

August 2003: In 9/03, Dubai - Frankfurt (747-400F, 2/week). Code share with Continental Airlines (CAL), London Gatwick (LGW) - Dubai and Newark - Houston. In 10/03, Dubai - Shanghai (4/week).

8 orders (2/04) A340-300's, ex-Singapore (SIA), Boeing (TBC) 9 year leased, pending the arrival of its 1st 777-300ER of 26 due to arrive in 2005. To be used on Dubai to Singapore, Casablanca, Johannesburg, Perth, and Osaka.

September 2003: To add a 3rd weekly Dubai - Shanghai (747-400F). (EAD) SkyCargo, Dubai - Istanbul (weekly). (EAD) SkyCargo, New York - Gothenburg - Dubai (747-200F, (TLS) wet-leased, weekly).

Last delivery of 29 A330-200's including $90M operating lease over 12-year term.

October 2003: Dubai to Brisbane, via Singapore (daily) with extentions to Auckland. Code share with Royal Air Maroc (RAM) Dubai - Casablanca. (EAD) SkyCargo, Dubai - Milan (MXP) (weekly).

Emirates (EAD) which flies to 64 destinations in 45 countries, wins the "Best Airline" award from the British newspaper "Daily Telegraph" readers, for the 4th time in 6 years. Dubai's "Jumeira Beach" won the Best Foreign Resort Hotel."

Last 6 months = +#Dhs 612M/+$167M (+51%) (+# Dhs 404.2M): 4.8M PAX (+17.7%); 73.65% LF; 315K tonnage (+29%).

A330-243 (455, A6-EAS) delivery. 1st A340-541 (471, A6-ERB), 12F, 42C, 204Y, delivery (6 months late). To be used for flights Dubai to Sydney (nonstop), London Gatwick and Osaka. Will have an $8M inflight information, communication & entertainment system, featuring 100 movies, 50 TV channels on demand, 350-plus audio channels, and 40 games.

November 2003: Emirates (EAD) SkyCargo, Dubai - Shanghai - Mumbai - Dubai (weekly). In 4/04, Dubai - Glasgow (A330-200, daily). (EAD) SkyCargo, Dubai - Shanghai - Dalian (747-400F, weekly). In 5/04, (EAD) passengers Dubai - Shanghai (A340-300, 3 class, 4/week) and Dubai - Vienna (4/week).

With a goal of becoming a "truly global airline," Emirates (EAD) plans to launch service to 6 new cities next year, including gateways in the USA, Scotland, central Europe, China and West Africa. Service to Africa will be Dubai to Abuja with continuing service to Accra.

3 A340-541's deliveries.

December 2003: Its maiden commercial flight, Dubai - Sydney (A340-500) took just under 14 hours. In 1/04, Dubai to Lagos and onward to Accra (A330-200, 4/week). This will be the 1st regularly scheduled nonstop air route between Dubai and West Africa, offering onward links for travelers connecting from (EAD)'s 9 daily UK flights to Dubai. In 6/04, Dubai - New York.

Emirates (EAD) Mercator Information Technology (IT) division provided consultancy support to Virgin Atlantic (VAA) in the implementation of several Oracle resource planning solutions including Oracle Financials, Oracle (HRMS), and Oracle Payroll.

As expected, (at the Dubai Air Show), (EAD) announced it has selected the (GE-P&W) Engine Alliance (GP7200) engine to power its follow-on order for 23 orders (2/09) A380's, including 2 (ILF) leased (92 installed & 9 spares) for >$1.5B.

A340-541 (520, A6-ERD) delivery.

January 2004: 2002 = +$287M (+$164M).

Will offer inflight e-mail service across its fleet using Tenzing software. The system will be installed initially on a new A300-500 beginning in the 1st Q and progressively across the entire fleet.

February 2004: Sky Cargo, Dubai - Pisa - New York (JFK) (747-400F, (TLS) wet-leased, weekly). Will extend one of its 4 weekly services to Shanghai, on to Dalian.

Plans for a hub at Auckland, New Zealand, to put intense competitive pressure on Qantas (QAN) and Air New Zealand (ANZ). Looking at Auckland to Fiji, Los Angeles (LAX), San Francisco (SFO), and Buenos Aires as part of a South Pacific expansion to serve its round-the-world capability. In 10/04, Perth - Auckland and/or Christchurch. Currently flies Dubai - Perth. In 10/04, to increase to 11/week with 4/week Dubai - Perth - Auckland.

2 orders (2/05) A340's for total 28. 2 A340-313X's (166; 190), ex-(SIA), Boeing (TBC) leased.

March 2004: Singapore inks open skies agreement with United Arab Emirates (UAE) that provides both countries with unrestricted traffic rights. Dubai International Airport has had +11.4% traffic annually since 1993, whereas Changi has had only +5%. Between Dubai and Singapore, Emirates (EAD) has operated 72 passenger flights and 2/week freighter service, with Singapore Airlines (SIA)'s 25 passenger flights, and a large array of freighter services.

United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Thailand signed an open skies agreement allowing carriers of both countries full traffic rights to operate any type of airplane and flight frequency between the two countries and beyond. Thai International (TII) operates 11 weekly services, while Emirates (EAD) and Gulf Air (GUL) have 14 and 11 respectively.

In 5/04, Dubai to Vienna (daily). In 6/04, Dubai - Christchurch, via Melbourne (A340-500, 3/week, 6/week in 8/04). New York (JFK) - Dubai (A340-500, 2/day).

April 2004: Dubai - Glasgow (daily nonstop). Dubai - Shanghai (3/week).

Unveiled fully enclosed Contour Premium Aircraft Seating, First Class (F) Suite on A340-500 for use on Dubai - New York (JFK) starting 6/04 - can be viewed at http://www.speednews.com/stw/emirates.

FY 2003 Emirates (EAD) Group = +# Dhs 1.74B/+$429M (+66.7%) (+# Dhs 1.05B/$247M): Emirates (EAD) = +# Dhs 1.57B (+73.5%) (+# Dhs 906.7M): 40.1B RPK (+26.7%); +32.2% ASK; 73.4% LF (-3.2); 10.4M PAX (+22.8%); 2.8B FTK (+33.3%); 66,000 tonnes of freight (+26%).

Emirates SkyCargo, Dubai - Budapest - Milan - Dubai (747-400F, weekly). Dubai - Bangalore - Singapore (747-400F, weekly).

May 2004: Signed a $108M financing agreement with a group of international commercial banks for its 5th A340-500, that it will use on long-haul routes including nonstop daily flights between Dubai and New York starting 6/04. The financing over a 12 year term, was arranged and funded by Standard Chartered Bank with Bank of Tokyo Mitsubishi and Lloyds TSB Bank as co-arrangers.

Unveils a global e-ticketing system that allows customers to book e-tickets from Dubai to any of its other 75 destinations and from another 26 cities in 19 countries. The remaining destinations in its network will become e-ticket-enabled in the next 12 months. E-tickets currently can be obtained through the airlines own reservation centers and will be made available to travel agents via Galileo in Australia and New Zealand by the end of May, in the US and Europe by 6/04, in the Far East by 7/04, and in the Indian sub-continent and Kenya by 7/04. In a year's time it will make e-ticketing available worldwide through most other GDS's as well.

A340-313X (149, A6-ERT), Boeing (TBC) leased & A340-541 (572, A6-ERE) delivery.

June 2004: Launches New York (JFK) - Dubai (A340-500, daily nonstop).

(EAD) signs with Lufthansa Technik (DLH) (LTK) Logistik covering consulting in areas including logistics, stocking systems, spare parts, and supply chain management.

Emirates (EAD) SkyCargo extends its cooperation agreement with IFLN, a logistics and freight forwarding group, incl preferential treatment for IFLN members on capacity & rates and other benefits.

July 2004: In 9/04, its 17th frequency, Dubai to Tehran.

Introduces a new service that allows passengers to check and send e-mails via their personal laptops while in flight. The service enables passengers with Wi-Fi-enabled laptops to access their regular e-mail accounts via "an onboard wireless hot spot" throughout the duration of the flight.

(EAD) Airport Services was awarded (ISO) 9001:2000 Quality Management System accreditation.

Agreement with CAE Training & Simulator company to become (EAD)'s exclusive flight simulator provider for 10 years. Will acquire 1 A340-600 & 1 A380 full flight simulators valued at # C$65M/$50M, to be installed in the (EAD) Aviation College in Dubai by mid-2006. (EAD) & CAE also share a joint training venture in Dubai that recently signed agreements worth # C$7M with Chinese, Russian, & Nigerian corporate airplane customers.

$1B contract with Matsushita (MAS) for installation of the eX2 audio/video on demand (IFE) system on (EAD) 's new Airbus fleet as well as new systems for other jets on order, and makes (MAS) the sole supplier for (IFE) systems to (EAD)'s fleet, which will total 169 by 2012. Up to 30% will be invested in manufacturing and digital media facilities in Dubai.

$80M deal with B/E Aerospace covering design, manufacture & delivery of First Class (F) Suites for all 31 A380's, with each airplane including 14 suites in a 1-2-1 config.

Initial Farnborough Show announcement of $2.96B, 4/9 orders 777-300ER's.

747-47UF (29258, N497MC), Atlas Air (TLS) wet-leased. A340-541 (394, A6-ERF), delivery.

August 2004: Selects the new Calidris Integrity Solution to "help it protect revenue and improve profits."

Signs # EUR 91M/$111M financing agreement with National Bank of Dubai & Emirates Bank Group for a new A340-500.

September 2004: In 1/05, Dubai - Mahe (Seychelles) (A330-200, 3/week).

October 2004: Dubai - Hamburg.

Emirates (EAD) Sky Cargo, Dubai - Johannesburg - Nairobi - Dubai (747-400F, (TLS) wet-leased, weekly), Dubai - Lahore - Taipei - Dhaka - Dubai (747-400F, (TLS) wet-leased, weekly).

November 2004: In 12/04, Dubai - Zurich (daily); - Geneva (daily). In 5/05, Dubai - Seoul.

Scandinavian (SAS) Cargo switches from Lufthansa Cargo (LUB) to Middle East Airlines (MEA) and Emirates SkyCargo (EAD) to support its cargo services for Gothenburg to Hong Kong (747-400F, 2/week).

Emirates (EAD) SkyCargo and Dnata Cargo have adopted (EAD) Mercator's recently launched new-generation cargo system called Chameleon, which takes care of the entire management and monitoring of cargo consignments.

10,507 employees.

Last 6 months ending 9/04 = +$236M (+41%) (+$167M): +30% ASK; 73.3% LF (+3.5); 6.1M PAX (+25.5%). (EAD) SkyCargo: 401,500 tonnes (+27%).

A340-541 (608, A6-ERG), delivery.

December 2004: Dubai International Airport officially reopened the Marhaba Lounge, which unlike most airport lounges, is available to all passengers. Travelers flying economy (Y) class to Dubai on Emirates' daily nonstop service from New York (JFK) receive complimentary access to the lounge, while economy (Y) passengers from other points of origin have to pay a fee of $17.

In 1/05, Emirates (EAD) SkyCargo, Dubai - Seychelles (A330-200, 3/week). In 5/05, Dubai - Seoul (A340-300 daily). In 10/05, Dubai - Hamburg (A330-200 daily). In 12/05, Dubai - Zurich (A330-200, daily).

3 orders A310-308 (592; 622; 646), ex-Aeroflot (ARO), bought from Airbus to convert to freighters by EADS by 7/05. A340-541 (611, A6-ERH) delivery.

January 2005: 30 orders (3/05) Class 3 Electronic Flight Bags (EFB) for its 777-300ER's.

February 2005: In 2/06, Dubai - Beijing (A340-300, daily nonstop).

Hiran Perera, VP Cargo-freighters.

(EAD) SkyCargo buys 3 A310-300F's to be delivered in 6/05 & 1/06.

March 2005: Dubai - Sydney, via Bangkok to be extended to Auckland (daily). Dubai - Accra (2/week nonstop), in addition to Dubai - Accra, via Lagos (4/week). Dubai - Casablanca (A330-200, 2 class, now 7/week). In 5/05, Dubai - Seoul (daily nonstop).

777-31HER (32706, A6-EBA), (ILF) leased, 777-36NER (32789, A6-EBB), (GEF) leased, and A310-308 (646, A6-EFA) bought from Tanja to be converted to freighter by EADS.

April 2005: Emirates (EAD) is the Dubai national carrier operating services to destinations in Africa, Asia-Pacific, the (CIS), Europe, the Indian subcontinent, the Far and Middle East, and North America. It also operates air freight and leisure travel divisions.

16,119 employees.

(FAX: +971 4 295 2001).

(IATA) Code: EK. (ICAO) Code: UAE.

Parent organization/shareholders: Govt of Dubai (100%).

Owns: SriLankan Airlines (43.63%).

Alliances: Air Mauritius (MAU); Air India (IND); British Airways (BAB); Continental Airlines (CAL); Daallo Airlines (DAO); Japan Airlines International (JAL); Philippine Airlines (PAL); Royal Air Maroc (RAM); Scandinavian Airlines (SAS); South African Airways (SAA); SriLankan Airways (LNK); & Thai Airways (TII).

Main Base: Dubai International (DXB).

Domestic, Scheduled Destinations: Abu Dhabi; & Dubai.

International, Scheduled Destinations: Accra; Amman; Athens; Auckland; Bahrain; Bangkok; Beirut; Birmingham; Brisbane; Cairo; Casablanca; Chennai; Christchurch; Colombo; Damascus; Dammam; Dar Es Salaam, Delhi; Dhaka; Doha; Dusseldorf; Entebbe/Kampala; Frankfurt; Glasgow; Hong Kong; Hyderabad; Islamabad; Istanbul; Jakarta; Jeddah; Johannesburg; Karachi; Khartoum; Kochi; Kuala Lumpur; Kuwait; Lagos; Lahore; Larnaca; London; Male; Malta; Manchester; Manila; Mauritius; Melbourne; Milan; Moscow; Mumbai; Munich; Muscat; Nairobi; New York; Nice; Osaka; Paris; Perth; Peshawar; Riyadh; Rome; Sana'a; Shanghai; Singapore; Sydney; Tehran; Tripoli; Vienna; & Zurich.

Emirates (EAD) Group FY 2004 = +# Dhs 2.6B/+$707.9M (+49%) (+# Dhs 1.75B/+$476M) (net profit): 51.39B RPK (+28.1%) (passenger traffic); +26.1% ASK (capacity); 74.6% LF (+1.2) (load factor). (EAD) FY 2004 = +# Dhs 2.34B (+48.7%) (+# Dhs 1.57B).

Has begun construction of a # Dhs 1.3B/$353.9M Engineering Center on a 136-acre site with 7 hangars on the north side of Dubai International Airport. This will be used to perform maintenance on its fleet, which is expected to double from the current 74 airplanes over the next 7 years, and for 3rd party maintenance. The complex will employ 3,000.

In 5/05, Dubai to Alexandria (A310, daily).

May 2005: The Times of London stated Emirates (EAD) is set to place an order for up to 50 A350 airplanes, worth $6B, and the order will be announced at the Paris Air Show in 6/05.

Launches 7-year, $550M sukuk (Islamic bond) issue in 6/05.

777-31HER (33501, A6-EBD), (ILF) leased.

June 2005: Dubai to Seychelles (5/week).

July 2005: Began construction of a new 6,000 sq m jet engine test facility at a site near Dubai. It has been designed in cooperation with General Electric International and due for completion in 2007. It will house a 13-m cross-section jet engine test cell and an APU test cell and will be capable of testing engines up to 150,000 lb thrust, including Rolls Royce Trent 500s/700s/800s, GP700S AND GE90-115Bs.

Emirates SkyCargo, Dubai - Islamabad (A310-308F, weekly).

In 11/05, to expand its Dubai - New York (JFK) (A340-500, 12F, 42C, 204Y, 2/day). 1st of 3 converted A310-308F's for Emirates SkyCargo.

August 2005: 16,392 employees (+8%).

777-36NER (32788, A6-EBE; & A340-541 (685, A6-ERI), deliveries.

September 2005: American Airlines (AAL) and Emirates Airline (EAD) launched interline e-ticketing earlier this week.

Mercator, the Information Technology (IT) division of Emirates (EAD) Group, said Syrian Arab Airlines (SYR) signed up for the passenger version of its Fastrac revenue accounting system.

A340-541 (694, A6-ERJ), delivery.

October 2005: Emirates SkyCargo (EAD) and Korean Air Cargo (KAL) agreed to share cargo capacity on (KAL) flights to Delhi and Mumbai. Emirates SkyCargo (EAD) now has an additional 22 tons on offer to Dubai on (KAL)'s 747-400F weekly services from Delhi (Fridays) and Mumbai (Wednesdays). Emirates SkyCargo (EAD) is increasing payload capacity to Shanghai by 50% by adding a fifth and sixth weekly frequency and upgrading the 747-200F to a dash 400F.

Air Malta (MLT) and Emirates Airlines (EAD) have signed an agreement by which Air Malta (MLT) will codeshare on (EAD) flights between Malta and Larnaca in Cyprus.

Emirates (EAD) postponed launch of its second daily A340-500 nonstop between Dubai and New York (JFK) from Nov 7 to Nov 16. The carrier cited the impact of the strike at Boeing, which caused a delivery delay that forced it to continue to use the airplane on other services.

Separately, Emirates (EAD) noted it is increasing its presence in five Asian markets. It added two weekly flights to Hong Kong on Oct 1, bringing its weekly total to 14. At the end of October, it will add three direct flights to Jakarta each week, returning to Dubai over Singapore. Jakarta already is served four times per week via Colombo and Singapore and three times per week via Kuala Lumpur. Singapore gets six more weekly services starting Oct 30; the airline currently operates 18 weekly flights to Singapore, two direct daily flights and four via Colombo. Also, from the end of October it will offer five weekly direct services to Kuala Lumpur, up from three per week currently. From early November it will add one more direct flight from Dubai to Bangkok, bringing the total to 19 per week. (EAD) will inaugurate direct service from Dubai to Abidjan (Ivory Coast) on Feb 1st. The airline will operate 4 flights a week, on Tue/Wed/Fri/Sun, with an A330-200 via Accra (Ghana).

Cisco Systems said it is working with Emirates Group (EAD) to implement a new 10-gigabit ethernet data center network at (EAD)'s operations headquarters in Dubai.

(EAD) will introduce an enhanced economy class on Nov 1. The upgrade will feature ergonomically designed seats with footrests and a new food presentation using custom matching trays and dishes, and will be implemented gradually across the carrier's network. It also is retrofitting its 777-200s with the inflight entertainment system currently available on its A340-500 and 777-300ER airplanes.

777-36NER (33862, A6-EBG), (GEF) leased.

November 2005: Emirates (EAD) and Korean Air (KAL) signed a codeshare agreement for service between Dubai and Seoul affecting 10 weekly flights between the cities. Emirates (EAD) launched daily nonstop service to Seoul in May. (EAD) on Feb 1 will launch 4X weekly A330-200 service from Dubai to Abidjan via Accra.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) launched its second daily New York (JFK) - Dubai flight using an A340-500.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) wants to double the number of weekly services it is permitted to operate between Dubai and Australia from 42 to 84, and the carrier's argument that it is run on strictly commercial principles drew an angry riposte from Qantas Airways (QAN) Chairman Margaret Jackson. "To suggest that Emirates Airlines (EAD) is competing on similar terms as commercially run airlines like Qantas (QAN) is, quite frankly, fiction," Jackson said in a statement. Noting that Emirates Airlines (EAD) is 100% owned by the Dubai government and that its chairman, Sheikh Ahmed Bin Saeed Al-Maktoum, is a member of the Dubai ruling family and head of the Dubai Department of Civil Aviation, which operates the airport, Jackson said, "Life must be wonderfully simple when the airline, government and airport interests are all controlled and run by the same people." She also observed that Emirates Airlines (EAD) pays no corporate tax in Dubai.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) President Tim Clark again floated the concept of operating some of the carrier's A380s in an all-economy configuration seating up to 780 passengers. (EAD) has ordered 45 A380s and some of these could be dedicated to the operation, which Clark dubbed Emirates Express. According to press reports, he suggested the concept partly was behind the airline's recent request for 42 additional weekly services between Australia and Dubai. However, it will not proceed with the plan in the near future because its plate already is too full. Clark discussed the idea at the A380 reveal in Toulouse in January, describing the airplane as "a perfect long-haul low-cost airplane." He speculated that "in an all-economy 780-seat configuration, an airline could operate the A380 from London's low-cost hub at Stansted to Adelaide in Australia via Colombo in Sri Lanka at a fare of €400 return and break even at 80% load factor." Qantas Airways (QAN) has strongly opposed (EAD)'s request to raise its traffic rights

"Robust" passenger and revenue growth lifted Emirates Airlines (EAD)'s half-year profit to +$251 million, a +7% rise over the + $236 million earned in the six-month period ending Sept 30, 2004. "Emirates (EAD) has delivered an excellent half-year result despite the fact that fuel cost rose +84%," Chairman Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al-Maktoum said in a statement. "This robust half-year performance reflects strong revenue growth and it also demonstrates the company's resilience and adaptability to new challenges in the operating environment."

Six-month operating revenue rose +28% from $2.22 billion to $2.84 billion as passenger numbers grew + 15% to 6.98 million, capacity went up + 16% ASK and load factor lifted +2.6 points to 76% LF. The carrier did not provide further information.

Emirates (EAD) SkyCargo carried +20% more cargo (482,643 tons) than in the year-ago period and saw revenue rise +33% to $550 million.

Emirates (EAD) paid $100 million in dividends and spent $333 million on airplane pre-delivery payments and other capital items during the first half of the fiscal year and raised $550 million through a bond issue. The carrier said it has $27.7 billion worth of airplanes on its order book and expects to double the size of its 83-jet fleet by 2012.

Plans for Dubai's new Jebel Ali Airport were unveiled at the Dubai Air Show, and if the world's carriers are shaken by the current infrastructure, the new airport will be major earthquake in airline boardrooms. The airport will measure 140 sq. km., 10 times the area of Dubai International and as big as London Heathrow and Chicago O'Hare combined. Airport City ultimately will have six runways and move 120 million passengers and 12 million tons of cargo a year. The first airplane will touch down in 2007 and the 2009 Dubai Air Show will be held at the airport's 500,000-sq-m Dubai Exhibition City site.

In other news from the show, Jeddah-based National Air Services (NTJ) announced plans for a low-cost airline, the first privately owned carrier in Saudi Arabia. (NTJ) started premium services three months ago between Jeddah and Riyadh using A320s and now wants to tap the thrifty end of the market. Initial services will link Jeddah, Riyadh and Damman using four A320s. Longer-term plans call for flights to most of the country's 26 major airports using 16 airplanes.

Emirates (EAD) President Tim Clark denied press reports that the airline is in discussion with ILFC (ILF) for a fleet of 787s following the lessor's order for 20 plus four options. Clark said that Emirates (EAD) executives had lunch with ILFC (ILF)'s CEO John Plueger but "787s were not discussed." ILFC (ILF) has contracted with Boeing for dash 8s and dash 9s and Emirates (EAD) only is interested in the proposed dash 10 model.

India is to spend up to $10 billion within four years on upgrading and building new airports at 41 cities, according to Minister for Civil Aviation Praful Patel, who also confirmed that both Air-India (AIN) and Indian Airlines (IND) will issue (IPO)s early next year. He dashed the international aspirations of the nation's startups, saying they need to have five years of domestic operations to "show consistency."

Some European airlines may be waging a war of words with Emirates (EAD) over the funding of its airplanes, but Lufthansa (DLH) Technik inked a deal in Dubai through its Hawker Pacific division for exchange, overhaul and support for the airline's 777s.

In an unrelated signing, Hong Kong Aero Engine Services Ltd (HAESL) and Singapore Aero Engine Services Ltd (SAESL) agreed to a new contract with Emirates (EAD) for the ongoing maintenance and repair of its Rolls-Royce (Trent) engines. The contract, potentially worth $600 million, will cover the maintenance of all (Trent 500)s, (Trent 700)s and (Trent 800)s for the next three years. Up to 200 engines could be overhauled under the agreement and the work will be shared between (HAESL) and (SAESL).

Plans for Dubai's new Jebel Ali Airport were unveiled at the Dubai Air Show. Encompassing 140 sq km, the facility will be 10 times the area of Dubai International and as big as London Heathrow and Chicago O'Hare airports combined. On completion, Jebel Ali will have six runways and move 120 million passengers and 12 million tons of cargo a year. The first airplane will touch down in 2007 and the Dubai Air Show will be held at the airport's 500,000 sq m Dubai Exhibition City site in 2009.

As widely tipped, Emirates Airlines (EAD) ordered 42 777s and took options on a further 20 Sunday at the 9th Dubai International Air Show with a $9.7 billion punch. The order is for 24 777-300ERs, 10 777-200LRs and eight 777-200Fs. The airplanes will help Emirates (EAD) increase frequencies and launch new services to the US West Coast and South America. The deal did not have any buyback provision for the airline's fleet of A340-500s, which will continue to be deployed on ultralong routes such as Dubai - New York and Dubai - Sydney.

Boeing may have received some unexpected help from Emirates (EAD) in its bid to sell 777-200LRs to Qantas (QAN). Emirates (EAD) President Tim Clark said he thinks that if Qantas (QAN) orders the type, it will "make a great success" of its proposed premium-class Sydney - London nonstop operation; "I am sure they will fill it every day." Emirates (EAD) ordered 10 777-200LRs Monday to open routes such as Dubai - Houston and Dubai - Rio de Janeiro. Boeing had more good news from its recent 777-200LR record-breaking flight from Hong Kong to London, telling media in Dubai that fuel consumption was +0.9% better that expected.

The carrier made no commitment for the A350 or 787, saying it is too early as it is "not yet confident of how the airplane would fit into the (EAD) fleet." President Tim Clark said in Dubai that there is no timeframe on the 787/A350 decision. The selection has been complicated by Boeing's recently offering the 787-10 model in response to (EAD)'s request for a larger variant.

The A380, in full (EAD) livery that included the airline's distinctive belly logo, graced the skies of Dubai to open the air show. The livery was in stark contrast to that of the A380 that went to Singapore with low-key Singapore Airlines decals. The airplane on display at Dubai, (MSN 004), in fact is destined for Emirates (EAD) competitor Etihad Airways (EHD).

777-31HER (32797, A6-EBH; 32708, A6-EBF), (ILF) leased.

December 2005: Mercator, the Information Technology (IT) division of Emirates (EAD) Group, won its first contract in Eastern Europe for its airline passenger revenue accounting solution from Tarom (TRM) of Romania.

Pelesys Learning Systems signed with (LTU) of Germany to provide Web-based training courseware for the next five years. It also signed to deliver its recurrent training program to Emirates Airlines (EAD).

Emirates Airlines (EAD) will launch four-times-weekly nonstop Dubai - Nagoya service on June 1 aboard three-class 777-200s. Frequency will be daily from July 1 and the route will be operated with A340-500s starting September 1.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) will inaugurate nonstop service from Dubai to Thiruvananthapuram (India) on February 1st. The airline will operate 8 flights a week, 7 of them with an A330-200 and 1 with a B777-200.

Engine Alliance said its (GP7270), selected to power Emirates Airlines (EAD)'s A380s, has completed the certification tests required by (FAA). Certification is expected this month. The engine ran at more than 94,000 lbs thrust and has accumulated nearly 3,000 hours and 7,000 cycles. It holds the market share lead with 58% of announced A380 firm orders, according to the (GE)-Pratt & Whitney joint venture.

Boeing appears to be finalizing the business case for the 787-10 just one week after Qantas (QAS)'s order for the 787-8 and 787-9HGW versions. The increase to a Maximum Take Off Weight (MTOW) of 255 tons for the 787-9 gives it the range of the dash 8 and the weight for an effective additional stretch, taking seating capacity up to that of the 777-200ER. The increase has been a requirement of Emirates Airlines (EAD), the principal catalyst behind development of the dash 10.

"It's fairly obvious to us that it's very doable with modest investment," 787 Program VP and General Manager Mike Bair said in a conference call. "It's clearly an airplane we see a marketplace for, obviously being spurred on by Emirates (EAD), which is very interested in the airplane."

Boeing agreed to the higher-weight version of the 787 in late September and Emirates (EAD) held off committing to the A350-9 while trying to convince the USA manufacturer to build the 787-10. Emirates (EAD) President Tim Clark said at the A380 Reveal nearly a year ago that "we have told Boeing we want [the 787-10]."

The additional model in the 787 family also will help Boeing in its attempt to secure orders from Singapore Airlines (SIA), British Airways (BAB), and Lufthansa (DLH). Bair said the dash 10 likely will not be ready before 2012. (SIA) is expected to be the next major carrier to announce its intentions, likely in late January, while Emirates (EAD) could be close behind, possibly at February's Singapore Air Show.

(SIA) was evaluating the 787-3 last year for intra-Asia routes but was not happy with the business case when compared with the pricing of A320s/737NGs to LCCs. Now it is looking at the 787-8 and dash 9 for long, thin routes to Europe, while the dash 10 would be ideal for intra-continental high-density services. Qantas (QAN) will be a certain buyer for the 787-10, as it already operates 747-300s and dash 400s on transcontinental services from Perth to Melbourne and Sydney.

Bair said the dash 10 could have "about 300 seats, plus or minus 10 or so" and that its overlap with the 777-200ER is not a huge concern. "Better for us to step on it than somebody else. If you can do a product the market is clamoring for, you'd be silly to deny it," he said.

Bair added that the company is on schedule to deliver 112 Dreamliners in 2008 and 2009 and is committed to fulfilling orders through 2012. He said a post-2009 production rate should be finalized in the first quarter.

2 777-36NER's (32785, A6-EBI; 32787, A6-EBJ), (GEF) leased.

January 2006: Full year 2005 = Passenger traffic 53.56B (RPK) (+21.3%) (15th highest in world); Freight traffic 3.79B (FTK) (+19.3%); 12.66M passengers (+15.9%).

B/E Aerospace announced that it completed a $45 million deal with Emirates Airlines (EAD) to design and manufacture the international super first class cabins on a portion of its new 777s.

Emirates (EAD) SkyCargo launches freighter service from Dubai to Lilongwe, Malawi, on January 13. Service will be operated jointly with Air Cargo Ltd, a subsidiary of Air Malawi (AML), using a newly converted Emirates (EAD) A310F.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) will inaugurate nonstop service from Dubai to Kolkata on March 26th. The airline will operate 6 flights a week, daily except-Saturday, with an A330-200. Emirates (EAD) will upgrade capacity on its Dubai to New York (JFK) route by switching one of the two A340-500s to a 777-300ER on the first of its two daily flights from September 1st. Emirates (EAD) will launch four-times-weekly service on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays, to Copenhagen from October 3 aboard two-class A330-200s, increasing to daily on October 29. It is the carrier's first passenger service to Scandinavia. Emirates (EAD) will launch thrice-weekly service to Addis Ababa from March 27 aboard A330-200s, increasing to daily on Dec 1.

(EAD) said its 777-200 fleet refurbishment is near completion. The project includes new seats in first and business classes, economy class enhancements, in-seat laptop power and personal entertainment and information systems. Remaining work on two of Emirates (EAD)' nine 777-200s will be completed by January 2007.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) said it will use Pacelab Cabin software to support refurbishment projects on its medium- and long-haul airplanes and to aid airplane acquisition decisions.

Evans & Sutherland (E&S) Computer Corporation said Malaysia Airlines (MAS) will equip its Thales A380 flight6 simulators with (E&S)'s EP-1000CT visual system. Emirates (EAD), Qantas (QAN) and Singapore Airlines (SIA) also recently placed orders for the system. (E&S) signed a deal with (CAE) to produce an EP-1000CT/ESCP-2000 system for an Embraer 170 simulator ordered by Saudi Arabian Airlines (SVA).

777-3FXER (34597, A6-ETA), delivery.

February 2006: Emirates Airlines (EAD) will double the frequency on its Dubai to Dusseldorf route from 1 to 2 flights a day on May 1st. The airline's daily 777-300 flight will be supplemented with a daily A330-200 flight. Emirates Airlines (EAD) launched four-times-weekly service to Abidjan via Accra aboard three-class A330-200s. Emirates (EAD) will launch a second daily service to Perth. It will operate the flight four times weekly from March 2 aboard A340-300s departing Dubai on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, & Sundays and Perth on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, & Sundays, increasing to daily September 2 aboard 777-200s. It has been operating a single daily flight on the route since May 2003.

Separately, Emirates SkyCargo (EAD) launched eight-times-weekly service to Thiruvananthapuram on Febraury 1 using belly capacity of passenger A330-200s and 777-200s. It also will increase service to Cochin from five-times-weekly to daily and to Chennai from four-times-weekly to eight.

Dubai International Airport handled 24.7 million passengers in 2005, a +14% increase over 2004, with cargo movement also growing +20% to 1.3 million tonnes. The airport expects more than 28 million passengers and 1.5 million tones of freight in 2006.

Dubai has announced plans to invest $15 billion to create a company that will develop airports, lease airplanes and make airplane parts and seek to tap into the growing demand for air travel in the Middle East and Asia. Dubai, which owns Emirates Airlines (EAD), said its airport development unit, Dubai Aerospace, would compete with British Airports Authority (BAA), Aeroports de Paris, and Fraport for airport development projects in India and China. It already operates the busiest airport in the Middle East in Dubai, which handled 24.7 million passengers and 1.3 million tons of cargo last year. Dubai also is seeking to rival American International Group's International Lease Finance Corp (ILF) and General Electric's (GE) Commercial Aviation Services (GEF) in the airplane leasing market.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) opened new First (F) and Business Class (C) Lounges at Sydney's Kingsford-Smith International Airport and at Perth Airport, representing an investment of approximately A$2.5 million/$1.8 million and A$2 million respectively.

The (EAD) Lounge in Sydney, covers 880 sq m and caters to 160 guests, making it the largest dedicated passenger lounge facility in Australia. It also features a business center with eight individual work stations. The Emirates (EAD) Lounge at Perth features 585 sq m of space and is designed to accommodate 106 guests, with a business center housing 12 individual work stations and a dining room. Each lounge has plasma screens and designer bathrooms and showers. Passengers can access wireless Local Area Network (LAN) facilities.

2 777-31HER's (34481, A6-EBK), delivery & (32709, A6-EBL), (ILF) leased.

March 2006: Emirates Airlines (EAD) will inaugurate nonstop service from Dubai to Bangalore (India) on October 29th. The airline will operate 8 flights a week departing Dubai daily, with a second flight on Mondays and departing Bangalore daily, except Saturdays with 2 flights on Mondays & Wednesdays. Out of Dubai, Emirates (EAD) will use a 777-200 on both Monday flights as well as on Wednesdays, & Sundays and an A330-200 on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays.
Emirates (EAD) will double the frequency on its Dubai to Zurich route from 1 to 2 flights a day on October 29th. The airline will operate an A330-200 on this new flight while the existing flight will operate with an A340-500. Emirates (EAD) inaugurated daily Dubai - Hamburg service aboard a 237-seat A330-200. Hamburg is the airline's fourth German destination. It also announced a three-year, multimillion-euro sponsorship of local soccer club, "Hamburger SV." Emirates Airlines (EAD) will go to double-daily service between Dubai and Paris Charles de Gaulle from March 26, up from 12 flights per week currently. The additional frequencies will be operated by an A330-200 configured for 237 in three classes. (EAD) launched six-times-weekly service to Kolkata and thrice-weekly flights to Addis Ababa, becoming daily from December 1, all aboard A330-200s.

Despite being unveiled at a no-expenses spared launch at the Asian Aerospace air show in Singapore late last month, little is known about Dubai Aerospace, apart from the general expectation that the $15 billion in funding it has for investment will allow it to make a profound impact on the aviation industry.

The state-backed company is expected to create business divisions in airplane leasing, Islamic airplane financing, airplane and component manufacturing, aviation services, and airport construction and operations. It aims to be among the world's top three companies in each of its chosen markets.

First stop is India, where the company has already begun talks with various state governments about the construction of much-needed airports and taking over the operations of others desperately in need of an upgrade. "We are in talks with some of the Indian states and we could reach a deal this year. We are optimistic," Managing Director, Mohammed Al Zarouni told reporters at Asian Aerospace. He also has an eye on China, where he expects more than 200 airports to be developed in the coming years.

Dubai Aerospace has been created by the government of Dubai in partnership with its investment arm, Dubai International Capital, property developer Emaar, the private investment firm Istithmar, mortgage lender Amlak, the Dubai Airport Free Zone Authority and the Dubai International Financial Centre, a financial free-zone. It will be based adjacent to Jebel Ali Airport, which opens next year. The airport is being designed to handle 120 million passengers a year, with a dedicated cargo runway to service the world's first "logistics city."

The company is expected to go on a hiring spree, selecting what company chairman Shaikh Ahmad Bin Saeed Al Maktoum describes as the world's "most efficient and skillful experts" in the aerospace industry. The company also intends to establish an aviation university which will offer postgraduate degrees and apprenticeships. It will be completed by 2015.

Dubai Aerospace also announced a formal link-up with Cranfield University of the UK, "which will lead to Dubai having its own specialist aerospace institute." DAE University, which will provide a wide range of academic degrees and apprenticeship programs, will be fully developed by 2015. It will be located within the DAE site at Jebel Ali Airport City.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) upgraded its onboard healthcare capabilities with the Tempus monitoring system, which records data such as blood pressure, pulse rate and temperature before sending it through the inflight communication system to specialists at the MedLink Response Center in Arizona. Manufactured by Remote Diagnostic Technologies of the UK, Tempus is installed on Emirates (EAD) A340-500s operating services to New York, Osaka, Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland and Christchurch. It will be added to the A380s and 777s on order.

Emirates Airlines (EAD) President Tim Clark said the carrier is considering delaying next year's scheduled delivery of a dozen A340-600s and is close to choosing between the 787 and A350-900 for a 50-airplane order. (EAD) currently operates a fleet of 90 airplanes. It is expecting to take delivery of up to 14 777-300ERs through March 31, 2007, but is evaluating holding off on the A340-600s while Airbus works on improvements. "Maybe we slow the delivery down to give Airbus more time to work over the airplane," he said. "I had some ideas to make the airplane better, like regarding fuel efficiency or maintenance items."

In two or three months, (EAD) is expecting to make its final decision between the A350-900 and the 787 Dreamliner. Of the latter, Clark said he is most interested in the 787-10 version. "We are talking about 16/17-hour nonstop flights, like to South America. We need an airplane for around 300 passengers on these operations," he said. From 2011, the new airplanes should replace older 777-200s and A330s.

Emirates will face a staffing challenge when it begins putting the

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
EAD-777
EAD-777 2017-11.jpg
EAD-777-200LR
EAD-777-300
EAD-777-300ER - 1000TH - 2012-03-A
EAD-777-300ER - 2013-11
EAD-777-300ER - 2015-01
EAD-777-300ER - Real Madrid FC-2015-01.jpg
EAD-777-300ER 2009-11
EAD-777-300ER A6-ECD-2017-07.jpg
EAD-777-300ER A6-ECF-2017-03.jpg
EAD-777-300ER-2010-08
EAD-777-31H
EAD-777-31HER - 2014-06
EAD-777-31HER 830-38982 A6-ECX 2017-06.jpg
EAD-777X - 2013-11
EAD-A330
EAD-A330-200-1999-11
EAD-A330-242
EAD-A330-243
EAD-A340
EAD-A340
EAD-A340-541
EAD-A340-541-2003-10
EAD-A380
EAD-A380
EAD-A380 - 2012-11
EAD-A380 - Waiting to Go-2016-02.jpg
EAD-A380 100th - 2017-11.jpg
EAD-A380 58th Received.jpg
EAD-A380-2005-12
EAD-A380-2008-08
EAD-A380-861 - 2015-02.jpg
EAD-A380-861 141 2018-04.jpg
EAD-A380-A-2005-12
EAD-A380-B-2005-12
EAD-A380-NOV05
EAD-A380-OCT05

December 2018:

5 +2 ORDERS 747-47UF (CF6-80C2B5F) (1227-29259, /05 N498MC; 1192-29261, /98 N408MC, 2001-01; 1220-29258, /99 N497MC, 2004-07; 1244-30559, /00 N412MC; 1304-32837, /02 N415MC), (TLS) WET-LEASED. EMIRATES SKY CARGO (EMC) COLORS. FREIGHTER.

10/10 ORDERS 747-8F (GEnx), FOR EMIRATES SKY CARGO (EMC) OPERATIONS. FREIGHTER:

0 777-21H (TRENT 877) (30-27247, /96 A6-EMD; 33-27248, /96 A6-EME; 42-27249, /96 A6-EMF), ALL 3 PHASED OUT BY 2015. 49C, 304Y.

0 777-21HER (TRENT 892) (54-27251, /97 A6-EMH; 63-27252, /97 A6-EMG; 47-27250, /96 A6-EMI; 91-27253, /97 A6-EMJ), ALL 4 PHASED OUT BY 2015. 18F, 49C, 236Y.

0 777-21HER (TRENT 892) (171-29324, /98 A6-EMK), 1 PHASED OUT 2015. 18F, 49C, 236Y.

0 777-21HER (TRENT 892) (176-29325, /98 A6-EML; 757-35589, A6-EWI, 2009-01), 2 PHASED OUT BY 2015. 49C, 304Y.

10 777-21HLR (GE90-115B) (654-35572, A6-EWA, 2007-08; 662-35573, A6-EWB, 2007-09; 677-35576, A6-EWC, 2007-11; 688-35577, A6-EWD, 2008-01; 775-35590, A6-EWJ, 2009-03), ALL PHASED OUT BY 2015. 226 PAX, 3 CLASS AND A 302 PAX, 38C, 264Y.

8 777-F1H (GE90-110B1) (766-35606, A6-EFD, 2009-03; 35607, A6-EFE, 2009-06; 35612, A6-EFF, 2011-08), (DAZ) LEASED FOR EMIRATES SKY CARGO (EMC) OPERATIONS. FREIGHTER.

1 777-300ER (TRENT 892), (ALE) LEASED, 18F, 42C, 320Y.

1 777-3FXER (538-34597, A6-ETA, 2006-01).

4 777-31H (TRENT 892-17) (300-28680, /00 A6-EMO; 326-29395, /01 A6-EMP; 32697, /02 A6-EMQ; 402-29396, /02 A6-EMR), (ILF) 10 YEAR LEASED, 12F, 42C, 310Y.

4 777-31H (TRENT 892-17) (256-29062, /99 A6-EMM; 262-29063, /99 A6-EMN; 408-29067, /02 A6-EMS; 418-29064, /02 A6-EMU), (SIL) LEASED, 18F, 42C, 320Y.

3 777-31H (TRENT 892-17) (414-32699, /02 A6-EMT 432-28687, /03 A6-EMV, 2003-02, 434-32700, /03 A6-EMW (THIS AIRPLANE WAS DESTROYED IN AN ACCIDENT ON AUGUST 3, 2016 - SEE REPORT); 444-32702, /03 A6-EMX), (ILF) LEASED). 18F, 42C, 320Y.

4 777-31H (TRENT 892) (42318, /14 A6-ENX; 42322, /15 A6-EPC; 42328, /16 A6-EPI; 42366, /17 A6-EPY), 2015-09, 2016-01, & 2017-02. 18F, 42C, 320Y.

4 777-300ER (TRENT 892-17), (ILF) LEASED. 12F, 42C, 310Y.

15 777-31HER (GE90-115B) (32704; 506-32706, /05 A6-EBA; 539-32707, A6-EBH, 2005-11; 536-32708, A6-EBF, 2005-11; 551-32709, A6-EBL, 2006-02; 569-32710, A6-EBP, 2006-06; 590-34484, A6-EBU, 2006-10; 628-32713, A6-EBZ, 2007-04; 582-32715, A6-EBS, 2006-09; 594-32728, A6-EBV, 2006-10; 619-32729, A6-EBX, 2007-03; 582-32730, A6-EBT, 2006-07; 585-32731, A6-EBT, 2006-09; 516-33501, /05 A6-EBD; 549-34481, A6-EBK, 2006-02; 578-34483, A6-EBR, 2006-08; 34484, A6-EBU)), 33501 RETURNED 2017-05. (ILF) 10 YEAR LEASED. 12F, 42C, 310Y.

28 777-31HER (GE90-115B) (690-35574, A6-ECF, 2008-01; 681-35575, A6-ECE, 2007-12; 709-35579, A6-ECG, 2008-04; 714-35581, A6-ECH, 2008-05; 35585, A6-EGH, 2011-10; 779-35588, A6-ECQ, 2009-04; 35592, A6-ECR, 2009-06; 817-35593, A6-ECU, 2009-09; 824-35594, A6-ECV, 2009-10; 35597, A6-EGE, 2011-08; 35603, A6-ENE, 2013-01; 38980, A6-ECS, 2009-07; 828-36981, A6-ECW, 2009-11; 830-36982, A6-ECX, 2009-11; 840-35595, A6-ECY, 2010-01; 847-38983, A6-ECZ, 2010-02; 861-38984, A6-EGA, 2010-04; 38986, A6-EGI, 2011-11; 38990, A6-EGV, 2012-07; 38991, A6-ENK, 2013-07; 41070, A6-EGG, 2011-10; 41073, A6-EGN, 2012-01; 41079, A6-EGU, 2012-07; 41085, A6-ENF, 2013-01; 41366, A6-ENT, 2014-08; 42330, 1379-42333, A6-EPK; A6-EPN, 2016-06; 42336, A6-EPQ, 2016-08; 42337, 2016-10; 42347, A6-EQB, 2017-05; 42359, A6-EQK, 2018-05). 8F, 42C, 304Y.

1 777-31HER (GE90-115BL2) (35596, A6-EGC), SOLD TO JACKSON SQUARE AVIATION 2011-06 & LEASED BACK. 12F, 42C, 310Y.

3 777-31HER (GE90-115B) (556-34482, A6-EBM, 2006-03; 576-34483, A6-EBR 2006-06), (SIL) LEASED. 12F, 42C, 310Y.

1 777-31HER (GE90-115B) (766-35606, A6-EFD), (DAZ) LEASED 2009-03.

20 777-36NER (GE90-115B) (540-32785, A6-EBI, 2005-12; 542- 32787, A6-EBJ, 2005-12; 532-32788, A6-EBE, 2005-08; 508-32789, /05 A6-EBB, 512-32790, /05 A6-EBC; 560-32791, A6-EBN, 2006-04; 568-32792, A6-EBO, 2006-05; 598-32793, A6-EBW, 2006-12; 632-32794, A6-ECA, 2007-06; 669-32795, A6-ECD, 2007-10; 535-33862, A6-EBG, 2005-10; 576-33863, A6-EBQ, 2006-08; 622-33864, A6-EBY, 2007-03; 664-33865, A6-ECC, 2007-10; 755-37703, A6-ECM, 2009-01; 761-37705, A6-ECN, 2009-02; 765-37706, A6-ECO, 2009-02; 768-37707, A6-ECP, 2009-03; 41077, A6-EGR, 2012-07), (GEF) LEASED. 12F, 42C, 310Y.

1 777-35R (GE90-115B) (35157, A6-JAC), 2015-03 IN JET AIRWAYS (JPL) COLORS WITH SMALL "OPERATED BY ETIHAD AIRWAYS" TITLES.

52 +33/7 ORDERS 777-300ER (GE90-115B).

19 +30/20 ORDERS 777-300ER (GE90-115B).

150/50 ORDERS 777X (GE9X):

40 ORDERS (2022) 787-10:

0 A300B4-605R (CF6-80C2A5), (ILF) 7 YEAR LEASED, 2 LEASED TO (TUN) FOR 2 YEARS 1998-12, 505 RETURNED (AIFS) LEASED TO (SUD) 1999-08, (563, A6-EKE, RETURNED AIRBUS LEASED TO (TUN) 2000-04) (747 RETURNED, LEASED TO (MEA). 608 SOLD TO (DLH) 2001-03. (558, /90 A6-EKD; 701, /93 A6-EKM). 701 SOLD TO (DLH) 2002-06. 18F, 35C, 163Y.

0 A310-308 (CF6-80C2A8) (667, /92 A6-EKL), (ILF) & (GAX) LEASED, 1 RETURNED TO AIRBUS (EDS) 1997-05 (432), 537 RETURNED 1999-11 TO (GAX), 600 RETURNED 2000-05, LEASED TO (KEN), 436 SOLD TO (IRN), 597 SOLD TO (AIJ) 2001-05. 695 RETURNED 2002-09. 658 SOLD TO (AIJ) 2002-04. 18C, 177Y.

0 A310-308F (CF6-80C2A8) (592, /92 A6-EFB, 2005-07; 622, /92 A6-EFC, 2006-01; 646, /92 A6-EFA, 2006-01), EX-(ARO), CONVERTED TO FREIGHTER BY (EADS), FOR EMIRATES SKY CARGO (EMC) OPERATIONS. FREIGHTER.

00 A330-243 (TRENT 772B-60) (248, /98 A6-EKQ; 251, /99 A6-EKR; 283, 293, A6-EKT; 295, 313, 314, A6-EKV; 316, A6-EKW; 324; 326, A6-EKX; 328, A6-EKY; 345, A6-EKZ; 348, AC-EAA "SPIRIT OF BIRMINGHAM" 2000-12; 365; A6-EAB; 372. A6-EAC; 375; 379; 384; 388; 390; 396, A6-EAG, 2001-04; 409, A6-EAH; 437; 451, A6-EAJ, 2002-01. 365; 372; TO (VAZ) 2011-01. 293; & 409; RETURNED TO LESSOR 2016-05. LAST A330-243 RETIRED 2016-11. 27C, 251Y PAX, (LATER AIRPLANES 12F, 42C, 183Y).

2 A330-243F (1032, A6-DCA, 2010-08; 1070, A6-DCB, 2010-09), FOR (EMC) OPERATIONS. FREIGHTER.

0 A340-313X (CFM56-5C4) (149, /96 A6-ERT, 2004-05; 166, /97 A6-ERN 2004-02; 185, /97 A6-ERP; 190, /97 A6-ERQ 2004-02; 202, /97 A6-ERR, 2004-04; 236, /98 A6-ERM 2004-01), EX-(SIA), (TBC) 9 YEAR LEASED. ALL RETIRED BY 2016-11. 185, & 236 12F, 42C, 213Y.

0 A340-541 (TRENT 553) (394, /02 A6-ERF, 2004-07; 457, /03 A6-ERA; 471, /03 A6-ERB, 2003-10; 485, /03 A6-ERC; 520, /03 A6-ERD; 572, /04 A6-ERE; 608, /04 A6-ERG - - SEE INCIDENT IN 2009-03; 611, /04 A6-ERH; 685, /05 A6-ERI, 8/05; 694, /05 A6-ERJ). 2 RETIRED AND BROKEN UP 2013-10. (ILF) LEASED. ALL 8 PHASED OUT 2013 - 2015. 12F, 42C, 204Y.

0 ORDERS (6/07) A340-642 HGW (TRENT 556) (MGTOW 376 METRIC TONNES), 10/10 CANCELLED.

0 ORDERS A340-642 (TRENT 556), (ILF) 12 YEAR LEASED.

00/00 ORDERS (2019-02) A350 XWB-900 (TRENT XWB), CANCELED 50/50 ORDERS 2014-06:

00 ORDERS (2019-02) A350 XWB-1000 (TRENT XWB), CANCELED 20 ORDERS 2014-06:

19 +39 ORDERS A380-388Q (TRENT 900) (2016-11), 14F & 76C (BOTH UPPER DECK) & 426Y (ON LOWER DECK).

1 A380-842 (167, A6-EVA, 2018-04; 236, A6-EUT).

90 +10 OPTIONS A380-861 (GP7270) (007, /08 A6-EDF; 009, /10 A6-EDJ; 011, /06 A6-EDA; 013, /06 A6-EDB; 016, /06 A6-EDC; 017, /06 A6-EDE; 019, /07; 020, /06 A6-EDD; 022, /07 A6-EDH; 023, /09 A6-EDG; 025, /10 A6-EDH; 028, /10 A6-EDI; 030, /10 A6-EDJ; 042, /10 A6-EDM; 046, A6-EDK; A6-EDO; 077, /11 A6-EDP; 080, /11 A6-EDQ "EXPO 2020 DUBAI UAE;" 083, /11 A6-EDR; 86, /12 A6-EDS; 90, /12 A6-EDT; 98 /12 A6-EDU; 101, /12 A6-EDV; 103, /12 A6-EDW; 105, /12 A6-EDX; 106, /12 A6-EDY; 107, /12 A6-EDZ; 108, /12 A6-EEA; 109, /12 A6-EEB; 110, /13 A6-EEC; 111, /13 A6-EED; 112, /13 A6-EEE; 113, /13 A6-EEF; 116, /13 A6-EEG; 119, /13 A6-EEH; 123, /13 A6-EEI; 136, /13 A6-EEO; 138, A6-EEP; 139, A6-EER; 140, A6-EES; 141, /14 A6-EEQ "UNITED FOR WILDWIFE LIVERY" 2018-04 - SEE PHOTO; 144, /14 A6-EEU; 154, /14 A6-EEX; 157, /14 A6-EEY; 159, /14 A6-EEZ; 168, A6-EOD, /14 2014-12; 169, /14 A6-EOE; 171, /15 A6-EOF; 172, /15 A6-JAC, 2015-03; 174, /15 (A6-EOH); 178, /15 A6-EOI, 2015-07; 184 /15 A6-EOK, "OSCAR KILO" 2015-07; 186 /15 A6-EOL "OSCAR LIMA" 2015-07 (See video of A380 (A6-EOL) slow motion takeoff:
https://www.facebook.com/AviationMyLove/videos/467953600385327/?t=3; 188, A6-EON, 2015-09; 190, A6-EOO, 2015-09; 203, A6-EOS; 213, A6-EUB, 2016-06; 216, A6-EUD, 2016-06; 217, A6-EUE, 2016-08; 221, A6-EPY, 2017-02; 229, A6-EUQ, 2017-06; 241, A6-EUX, 2017-07; A6-EUZ), 14F (PRIVATE SUITES), 76C (FULL FLAT BED SEATS), 427Y.

36/16 ORDERS (2020-02) A380-861:

1 +1 ORDER A380-861 (GP7270) (025, /076 A6-EDG), (ILF) LEASED. 575 PAX.

0 ORDERS A380-862F (GP7277) (/08 A6-EFA; /08 A6-EFB), (ILF) 15 YEAR LEASED. SWITCHED 2 ORDERS FROM FREIGHTER TO PASSENGER VERSION BECAUSE OF 6 MONTH DELAY IN DELIVERY.

1 ACJ319 (CFM) (/11 A6-CJE), EXECUTIVE JET, INCLUDES 10 SUITES - - SEE ATTACHED - - "EAD-2014-12 - EXECUTIVE CHARTER A319." 19F.

Click on http://www.emirates.com/ae/english/flying/our_fleet/emirates_a380/emirates_a380.aspx to take a virtual tour on-board (EAD)’s A380 with Google Street View.5

Management:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
EAD-1 MGMNT 2006-01
EAD-1 SHEIKH AHMED BIN SAEED AL MAKTOUM
EAD-1-SIR TIM CLARK - 2014-11
EAD-1-Sir Tim Clark - 2016-06.jpg
EAD-1-Sir Tim Clark - 2016-12.jpg
EAD-1-Sir Tim Clark Interview-A-2015-05.jpg
EAD-1-Sir Tim Clark Interview-B-2015-05.jpg
EAD-1-Tim Clark - Alan Joyce-2012-06-A.jpg
EAD-1-Tim Clark - Alan Joyce-B.jpg
EAD-1-Tim Clark - Alan Joyce-C.jpg
EAD-1A CHMN 2004-07 ALAN MULALLY
EAD-1A CHMN 2005-01
EAD-1A CHMN 2009-08
EAD-2 MAURICE FLANAGAN - 2002-11-A.jpg
EAD-2 MAURICE FLANAGAN - 2002-11-B.jpg
EAD-2 MAURICE FLANAGAN - 2004-08GRPPRES
EAD-2 MAURICE FLANAGAN 2004-08
EAD-2-Sir Tim Clark F Suite 777 2018-04.jpg
EAD-3 -TIM CLARK - 2011-10 - A
EAD-3-SIR TIM CLARK - 2014-09
EAD-3-TIM CLARK - 2005-04
EAD-3-TIM CLARK - 2005-12-A
EAD-3-TIM CLARK - 2011-02
EAD-3-TIM CLARK - 2014-01
EAD-4-ADEL AL REDHA - C - 2014-08
EAD-4-THIERRY ANTINORI-2014-08
EAD-5 NIGEL PAGE SR VP
EAD-5-ADNAN KAZIM - 2014-08
EAD-5-Adnan Kazim-R-2015-12.jpg
EAD-6-SALAM OBAIDALLA - 2012-11
EAD-7 ANDREW PARKER 2008-03
EAD-8 LAURIE BERRYMAN VP UK - 2010-12
EAD-8-ABDULLAH OSMAN - 2013-12
EAD-9-DR NICKLAS DAHLSTROM - 2013-09
EAD-9-LUKE GREGORI - 2013-12

H H SHEIKH AHMED BIN SAEED AL MAKTOUM, CHAIRMAN & PRESIDENT.

MAURICE FLANAGAN, GROUP PRESIDENT, EXECUTIVE VICE CHAIRMAN & FOUNDING CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO), PASSED AWAY (2015-05).
May 2015: One of Middle East aviation’s leading figures, Maurice Flanagan, died. Flanagan, 86, was the founding (CEO) of Emirates Airline (EAD).

In 1985, he led a 10-man team that launched (EAD) with, as he later described it, 2 leased airplanes, a $10 million grant and a strict warning from the Emirate’s government not to come back for more.

In 1990 he became Group Managing Director of the Emirates Group. He was the Group’s Executive Vice Chairman until his retirement in 2013.

Maurice left British Airways (BAB) in 1978 to become Director & General Manager of Dubai Airport services organization, dnata, during the early days of the Emirate’s economic development.

During his career with Emirates (EAD), Maurice steered the young carrier to become a leading international aviation player, espousing both high standards of service and innovations such as In-Flight Entertainment (IFE) screens in all classes of its airplanes. (EAD) said he had been a vocal champion for the benefits of competition and innovation.

Emirates (EAD) reported a +40% full-year profit increase of $1.3 billion in 2014.

(EAD) noted his death “with great sadness” at home in London.

Emirates Group Chairman & (CEO) H H Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum said, “The Emirates Group, and Dubai has lost a great friend. Maurice was a man of great character, and a legend in the aviation industry. He was generous with his time, forthright in his views, and a person who gave 110% to everything he did. It was a great personal pleasure and privilege to have worked with him. His contributions to dnata, Emirates (EAD) and Dubai will always be remembered.”

SIR TIM CLARK, PRESIDENT (EAD).
2014-01: Penton's "Aviation Week" selected Tim Clark, President of Emirates Airline (EAD), as its "2013 Person of the Year." Aviation Week's editors recognized Clark for his role in reshaping the competitive landscape in the long-haul airline market and his outsize sway in airplane design.

"Clark's in-depth airline and airplane expertise combined with his friendly outspokenness have made him into one of the most influential figures on the customer side of the industry. Clark has never been shy to express his opinion publicly," said Jens Flottau, Aviation Week's Managing Editor, Civil Aviation.

With Clark at the helm, Emirates Airline (EAD) is the largest operator of Boeing 777s and a launch customer for the new 777X. (EAD) also accounts for half of the Airbus A380 order book.

"Since 2006, "Aviation Week"'s Person of the Year has recognized individuals who have had a major impact on the aerospace, defense and aviation industries (for better or worse," said Aviation Week & Space Technology Editor-in-Chief, Joseph C Anselmo). "Under Tim Clark's leadership, (EAD) transformed the competitive landscape in the long-haul airline market. (EAD) also become a crucial customer of Airbus and Boeing to the point where it holds sway in the design configurations of new airplanes such as the Boeing 777X."

"AIRLINE BUSINESS" Interview - - 2011-10:
Tim Clark spent the past quarter of a century building the ultimate big boy’s toy. Along with his Emirates (EAD) management team, Clark created a global network carrier flying state-of-the-art airliners to every corner of the globe with an on-board product up with the best, and a brand to die for. But he’s rattled a few cages on the way, as jealous rivals look on (some incredulously and others angrily) at the apparent ease with which (EAD) has done it. Those rivals should be warned: Clark does not intend to slow down.

“We are still firm believers in our plan to globalize the (EAD) network,” he said. “And this isn’t a token presence in a particular city via multiple intermediate points. This is a robust presence in the points that we serve on a minimum of a daily basis and eventually 2x- or 3x- times a day.”

Clark put the pieces in place. He has the right size, mix and number of airplanes in the fleet or on order, he has the route rights, the airport infrastructure and (most controversially for his rivals) he has the full support of his government. Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al-Maktoum (the uncle of Dubai’s ruler Sheikh Mohammed) is Chairman & (CEO) of Emirates Airline (EAD) and Group.

“I work very closely with Sheikh Ahmed. He’s the boss, and there’s nothing I do that he doesn’t sanction,” said Clark.

“(EAD) arrived on the scene in the 1980s just at the time when the global economy was exploding, and off it went on that wave. There are those who in that post-1985 era couldn’t understand it and couldn’t climb to get there (and they’re still not there). We were born on that wave and able to move with the tide very rapidly.”

(EAD) now serves at least 114 destinations across every continent and has a passenger fleet nearing 150 airplanes. As it works to establish that “robust presence” throughout the globe, Clark said flying transpacific services between points in the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Australasia is “the only piece of the jigsaw that’s missing. We’re just getting into the start positions (we have the West Coast of the USA, we have Chinese points, we have Asian points, we have Australasian points). So the Pacific is encircled and the next stage is to link the dots (we have the rights).”

Clark said if he could have his way, this phase of the (EAD) strategy would be initiated “sooner rather than later”, but he recognized the timing was not quite right yet. “We need to consolidate our market presence in places like the USA. We need to be as understood in the USA as we are, for example, in Europe.” The “underlying demand” (EAD) generated through its huge network feeding into its Dubai hub meant the airline was able to ride out the tough times. “We’ve always got people feeding into the system,” saids Clark, who saw this continuing to expand as the airline grew and became even more global. “When I open the door of an airplane in Dubai and I’ve got 40 points serving it, each with 5 people on, I’ve got 200 people on board simply because we are there in their markets.”

Emirate's 148-strong all-wide body fleet comprises 45 A330/A340s, 15 A380s and 88 777s, as well as 9 freighters (6 747-400Fs and 3 777Fs). With the oldest passenger airplanes having been in service for more than a decade, a significant portion of the fleet would start to be phased out as more 777s and A380s are delivered.

“We gradually phased out about 70 airplanes – A330s, A340-300s and 777 Classics. Most would have gone by about 2015 or 2016, although 1 or 2 will be retained longer.”

The current order backlog stood at just >200 airplanes, and the influx of new equipment combined with the roll-over would see the (EAD) passenger fleet grow to around 185 airplanes by March 2013.

Continuous fleet growth fuels the endless need for more operational staff, with Clark revealing that just prior to the interview, he had signed off on another 1,000 flight attendants (CVA), who would join (EAD) by March next year. “That would take us up to 16,000 cabin crew (CA),” he added. While (EAD)'s expansion would continue, “behind the scenes we’re going to have to be a bit more thrifty because the stubbornness of the oil price is giving us concerns about the bottom line.

“We’re all a little bit concerned about what is going on in the global economy and the volatility. And when there is volatility, it has an effect on demand.”

This concern will mean (EAD) is more cautious about “the pace at which we increased production and stretched the network” and has seen the airline’s management given “some fairly stiff parameters” to reduce the costs of “inward-facing, back-of-house” functions. “We have been totally focused on growth (perhaps behind the scenes some of those costs have grown at a greater pace),” Clark said. “We’ve had to dig deep and go into structural costs to see where we could start pulling out 5 to 8%.”

The costs focus comes on the back of a stellar financial performance in 2010 by the Emirates Group, which posted a +43% rise in net profit to +Dhs5.9 billion/+$1.6 billion on sales that were up more than a quarter to Dhs57.4 billion. (EAD), the airline arm contributed the bulk of the profit, to the tune of +Dhs5.4 billion, while passenger numbers rose >+14.5% to 31.4 million.

The 2010 - 2011 financial year took a slight hit from the effects of the Arab Spring, but Clark said (EAD) has “dealt with that” and is now optimistic about the political changes across the Arab World. “I’m a great opportunist and a great believer that the change will deliver good,” he said.

Clark said the airline’s system-wide seat load factor was running at about 78 - 79% LF, some -3% points below where he wanted it. “The problem is with the oil price where it is, we face a situation where fuel is almost +60% higher than what we were paying the previous year, so the trick was to ease up and better manage the income streams.

“That’s not necessarily putting up fares. We had to assess the various revenue segments in which we operate and could try to improve the quality of business within those segments.”

Clark said he is surprised yields so far have stayed where (EAD) wanted them. “In fact we’ve got more out of them that summer, but it was at a price (demand was affected). The rate of increase in the segments declined.”

(EAD)’s continuous network development has currently seen a drive to expand into the Americas, with several new destinations coming on line during those next few months, including points in South America (Rio and Buenos Aires) and the USA (Dallas/Fort Worth and Seattle). The latter market is one where Clark said (EAD) had to raise its brand profile and consolidate its market presence. The USA is a “really difficult nut to crack” as it is not a single entity, he said. “We’ve done that through adding more destinations and getting our marketing act together.”

Expansion is ongoing elsewhere too, with Baghdad, St Petersburg, Zambia and Zimbabwe all coming on line. China has been a key market and a major area in Clark’s sights for growth. 3 points have been served, as well as Hong Kong. “We want a lot more from China, at least another 4 destinations,” he said. “Asia is very strong and it will continue to grow for us. The groundswell of support from the consumer base in the Asian markets for (EAD) is very strong. People vote with their feet.

“We need more access in to India. And we’ree taking up our frequencies into Australia (starting by going to 12 flights a day).”

But Clark, known for his candidness during interviews, has been reluctant to divulge too much from his (EAD) network master plan (for fear of imitation). “Whereas 15 years ago nobody was really interested in what we were going to do, the moment I say anything now, I get 5 other carriers moving in there very quickly.”

His openness returned when discussing how (EAD) expansion plans have fallen victim to politics in markets where government concerns have prevented the airline from gaining the greater access it has sought. This has been a problem in Germany, where suspected behind-the-scenes lobbying by Lufthansa (DLH) limited (EAD) to only 4 gateways. Similarly, (EAD) has struggled to expand its Vienna services. “Austrian (AUL) warned that it was not going to make its 2011 - 2012 profit targets and we came up against that 1st-hand because, ‘shock horror’, there was a huge opposition to a 2nd frequency into Vienna,” said Clark. However, Clark believed the tide was already turning for the “keep them out” campaigns.

“Irrespective of the positions of the legacy carriers and alliances, there now seems to be a realization (even amongst them) that this is not going to work. They’ve got to shape the way they go about their business activities to take us on.”

Clark admitted he takes an “obtuse view” towards competition, be it from fellow Gulf airlines, any threat from China, or legacy rivals.
“I’m a great believer in competition and in the airline business itself. The more people that can buy A380s or 777-300ERs, the better it is for all of us. It’s a paradox, but the fact is that I honestly believe it helps us to do the job better.”

However, 1 aspect of modern competition he cannot abide are the global alliances, whose behavior he likens to global “gang warfare,” threatening to stifle competition and prevent it being nurtured. “I’m so opposed to alliances because I believe they distort and channel and direct for the greater good of the alliance thing, rather than the consumers that are driving it all.” Clark said the alliances (particularly Star (SAL)) have created “a fairly difficult, vicious structure internationally” and is concerned about how much of a threat (EAD) is perceived to be. “We have learnt that we are considered to be the single largest threat to the Star Alliance (SAL) group on the Planet today. While I’m hugely flattered by this, it is also a worry because it shouldn’t be that. There is actually room for us and our way of doing things, and the way they do. I don’t spend my time trying to take down the Star Alliance (SAL). I’d rather work with all these airlines on an independent basis, and that’s what we do. Because I’ll always give business to the partners that we have relationships with.”

(EAD) recently published a paper entitled "Aviation at the Crossroads – Safeguarding Competition & Consumer Choice," in which it highlights recent tactics by the alliances that create a “join or perish” commercial incentive for non-aligned airlines. “The emergence of 3 mega-alliances presents public policy concerns that merit careful attention”, and could “harm consumers”, (EAD) said in the paper.

Unsurprisingly, Clark said the thought of joining an alliance is “anathema” to (EAD). “There’s no point in even going there. You must have total command and control of what you do. You can’t allow yourself to be subjected to the whims of an amorphous board, like the Star Alliance (SAL), saying ‘you can’t do this, you can’t do that; you’ve got to buy this airplane; you’ve got to fly this route’. Not in the world as it is today. We want to move rapidly where we have opportunities, for example, to second or third-level airports. I don’t want to be told ‘you can’t go to that hub; I’m going there so you feed me’. Forget it.”

This sort of independent thinking has been central to (EAD)’s early and continued success. “When the global economy took off, because we were totally focused on what we do, because we were not alliance-affiliated, we had nobody else to answer to, and we did things the way we wanted to. We recognized in the mid-1990s that the world was changing rapidly and we had to adapt our business. We exploded the growth of (EAD), took on huge numbers of orders that shook the industry. We did that because we could see [demand for air travel] was going bananas.”

By comparison with the (EAD) buying frenzy the previous year (that saw it order another 32 A380s and 30 777-300ERs) later years would be fairly quiet for (EAD), so far. However, Clark already has his eyes on the next potential acquisition (a successor for (EAD)’s huge fleet of 777-300ERs).

His deep understanding of airplane performance means he was never slow in getting stuck in with the design teams in Toulouse and Seattle as they developed their recent large wide body types. It is no different now. Clark has been quick to express his displeasure at the way Airbus (EDS) has messed around with the design of the A350-1000 (for which he has had 20 orders and could potentially take more if the airplane’s specifications would meet Emirates (EAD)'s requirements) and is pushing Boeing (TBC) as it develops a 777-300ER successor, with the view to being a potential launch customer.

Airbus (EDS) unveiled a revised specification for the largest A350 variant at the Paris air show in June, along with a 2-year delay to service entry (eis) from 2015 to 2017. The changes center on a modified, more powerful variant of the Rolls-Royce (RRC) (Trent XWB) engine, along with increased weights to provide additional range capability. But Clark was not happy the revisions were implemented without any dialogue with (EAD). “If they had talked to me, I would have said: ‘[The improvement is] not good enough’,” he said.

“On paper, the old A350-1000 was hugely economical (it was a 777-300 classic replacement). That’s why I talked about ­converting my A350-900 orders.” But that possibility has dimmed with the changes, and Clark hopes Boeing (TBC) could hold the answer. “There’s a lot of work going on [at (TBC) on the new 777], and we’re involved in it.”

Clark has informed Boeing (TBC) that (EAD) needs a twinjet capable of flying a 50-tonne payload (by its rules) between Dubai and Los Angeles. Today, that route is operated by a 777-300ER, with a payload of about 35 - 37 tonnes. “I keep telling Lars Anderson [head of Boeing’s 777 Advanced Product Development team] that I’m already flying the 777-300ER there, so give me an airplane that can do it reasonably, so I’m not shedding payload to get us there,” he said.

When he was not busy assisting the airframers with their product development strategies, Clark was also taking a leading role in a push to shake up (IATA) (ITA) post Giovanni Bisignani.

His now famous observation from the floor at this year’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) that the association was perceived as being “run for the few, by the few” was part of an effort by a group led by the Gulf carriers to see reform at (IATA) under the stewardship of newly appointed Director General, Tony Tyler.

Participation in the management of another airline is a strategy that Clark indicated he was in no rush to repeat, after the experience (EAD) had when it acquired a minority stake in SriLankan Airlines (LNK) in 1998.

“We were in there for 10 years and spent a huge amount of time on the project,” he said. “I was down there 6x- a year, even with (EAD)'s Peter Hill running it.”

Although Clark joked that British Midland International (BMA) could be available to be bought from Lufthansa (DLH) for “200 million," he says there was “nothing on the cards” at that moment for (EAD) to buy into another carrier. “But we never say never,” he added.

GARY CHAPMAN, PRESIDENT GROUP SERVICES, DNATA (SUBSIDIARY) & ASSOCIATED COMPANIES.

ADEL AL REDHA, CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER (COO) & EXECUTIVE VP ENGINEERING & OPERATIONS (2002-11).

CHRISTOPH MUELLER, CHIEF DIGITAL & INNOVATION OFFICER (CDIO), EX-(MAS)/ARL) (2016-09).
Christoph was ex-(CEO) of both Malaysia Airlines (MAS) and Aer Lingus (ARL).

ALI MUBARAK AL SOORI, EXECUTIVE VP CHAIRMAN'S OFFICE FACILITIES/PROJECTS MANAGEMENT, PROCUREMENT & LOGISTICS.

NIGEL HOPKINS, EXECUTIVE VP FINANCE.

ABDULAZIA AL ALI, EXECUTIVE VP HUMAN RESOURCES (HR).

THIERRY ANTINORI, EXECUTIVE VP PASSENGER SALES WORLDWIDE (2011-10).

CAPTAIN ALAN STEALEY, DIVISIONAL SENIOR VP FLIGHT OPERATIONS.

CAPTAIN HENRY DONOHOE, SENIOR VP SAFETY

IAIN LACHLAN, DIVISIONAL SENIOR VP ENGINEERING, EX-(BMA).
Iain was formerly Senior VP Aircraft Maintenance in 2000.

NASSER BIN KHERBASH, DIVISIONAL SENIOR VP HUMAN RESOURCES (HR) DEVELOPMENT & EMPLOYEES SERVICES (2008-01).

ADNAN KAZIM, DIVISIONAL SENIOR VP PLANNING, AEROPOLITICAL & INDUSTRY AFFAIRS.

ABDULLAH AL HASHIMI, DIVISIONAL SENIOR VP GROUP SECURITY.

SHEIKH MAJID AL MUALLA, DIVISIONAL SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS.

HUBERT FRACH, DIVISIONAL SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS WEST.

BARRY BROWN, DIVISIONAL SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS EAST.

JOHN HOPKINS, SENIOR VP FINANCE.

RAM MENEN, SENIOR VP CARGO (EMC).

ANTOINE TAYEH, SENIOR VP PLANNING INTERNATIONAL & INDUSTRY AFFAIRS.

TERENCE DALY, SENIOR VP SERVICE DELIVERY.

KHALED KAMDA, SENIOR VP CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT.

RICHARD KHIANG, SENIOR VP CUSTOMER AFFAIRS.

NIGEL PAGE, SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS - THE AMERICAS & AFRICA (2004-03).

MIKE SIMON, SENIOR VP CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS.

DAN GRIFFITH, SENIOR VP AIRPORT SERVICES.

ANDREW PARKER, SENIOR VP PUBLIC AFFAIRS & THE ENVIRONMENT (2008-02).

KEITH LONGSTAFF, SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS WORLDWIDE.

SALEM OBAIDALLA, SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS FAR EAST & AUSTRALASIA.

JEN LUC GRILLET, SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS AFRICA.

ROB GURNEY, SENIOR VP NORTH AMERICA, RESIGNED (2016-09).
Rob resigned to replace Bruce Ashby as (CEO) of the global airline Oneworld (ONW) Alliance.

ORHAN ABBAS, SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS, THE AMERICAS (2012-09).

THIERRY AUCOC, SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS, EUROPE & RUSSIA FEDERATION.

BADR ABBAS, SENIOR VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS, FAR EAST.

HIRAN PERERA, SENIOR VP CARGO PLANNING & FREIGHTERS.

TIM JENKINS, SAFETY SENIOR VP.

NABIL SULTAN, DIVISIONAL VP CARGO.

ABDULLAH OSMAN, VP ENGINEERING MATERIAL MANAGEMENT & SUPPLIER SUPPORT, EMIRATES ENGINEERING.

GEOFF HOUNSELL, VP FLIGHT OPERATIONS SUPPORT SERVICES & AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT.

BOB EVEREST, VP FLIGHT OPERATIONS SUPPORT.

PATRICK BRANNELLY, VP CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS.

JIM BAXTER, VP NORTH AMERICA.

LARRY BERRYMAN, VP UK & IRELAND (2010-12).

EDWIN LAU WING-CHU, VP HONG KONG & TAIWAN.

ADEL AL GHAITH, VP COMMERCIAL OPERATIONS NORTHERN & WESTERN AFRICA.

HIRAN PERERA, VP CARGO-FREIGHTERS (2005-02).

RAVISHANKAR MIRLE, VP CARGO COMMERCIAL.

AHMED AL-MULLA, DIRECTOR ENGINEERING & OPERATIONS, (DXBMYEK) (1999-05.

DON FOSTER, DIRECTOR SERVICE DELIVERY (1999-06).

MOHAMMED AL KHAJA, DIRECTOR SAFETY, TRAINING & STANDARDS
(m.alkhaja@emirates.com) (DXBZWEK) (2000-12).

CHRIS KNOWLES, DIRECTOR FLIGHT OPERATIONS (crknowles@emirates.com).

CAPTAIN ABBAS SHABAN SALMAN, CHIEF PILOT A380.

MICK QUINN, HEAD GROUP SAFETY (DXBYZEK),
(mick.quinn@emirates.com).

MOHAMMED MATTAR, SENIOR GENERAL MANAGER, GROUND OPERATIONS.

CAPTAIN LARRY SMITH, SENIOR GENERAL MANAGER SPECIAL PROJECTS.

CAPTAIN CARL VAN DER MERWE, GENERAL MANAGER FLIGHT OPERATIONS BOEING

CAPTAIN JOHN SELWOOD, GENERAL MANAGER FLIGHT OPERATIONS AIRBUS.

CAPTAIN MICHAEL O'GRADY, GENERAL MANAGER TECHNICAL FLIGHT OPERATIONS.

A KADER TAZEROUT, GENERAL MANAGER QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA).

CHRIS VAN ZYL, GENERAL MANAGER ENGINEERING SERVICES (1998-04).

LUKE GREGORI, MANAGER BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING & GROUP SAFETY, EMIRATES GROUP INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT).

NICK REES, REGIONAL MANAGER COMMERCIAL, FAR EAST & AUSTRALIA (2014-04).

JON SHEPPARD, MANAGER NATIONAL ACCOUNTS UK, EX-(AFA)/(KLM).

ANDREW BUNN, MANAGER SINGAPORE, EX-(DHL) 2014-04.

SUAREZ DE GONGORA, MANAGER SPAIN.

ED JOHNSTONE, MANAGER LINE MAINTENANCE.

MALCOLM BROWN, LINE MAINTENANCE MANAGER, EX-(VAA) (2000-08).

DAVID READ, MANAGER BASE MAINTENANCE.

MOHD JAFFAR NASSER, BASE MAINTENANCE MANAGER (DXBMEEK).

KEITH CARTER, MANAGER OVERHAUL WORKSHOPS (2000-08).

MAHMOOD AMEEN, MANAGER ENGINEERING PROJECTS (2002-01).

BEN JOHNSON, MANAGER ENGINEERING PROJECTS (1997-12).

BASSAM HISLI-HIJLEH, FLIGHT OPERATIONS GROUND TRAINING MANAGER.

ADNAN GHANI, MANAGER ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT (DXBMPEK)
(dev.eng@emirates.com) (2000-04).

KEN WILDING, MANAGER MAINTENANCE CONTROL CENTER (MCC) (2000-05).

GARY JONES, MANAGER OUTSTATION MAINTENANCE (2000-05).

DR NICKLAS DAHLSTROM, HUMAN FACTORS MANAGER.

AHMED SAFA, LIGHT BASE MAINTENANCE MANAGER (2000-12).

V K VERMA, DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER (CABIN INTERIOR),
(vk.verma@emirates.com).

BOB LUNN, ENGINEERING FACILITIES MANAGER.

 
Top of Page

 

Since you are not logged in, we can show you only live Airtran Airways data. This page will demonstrate the depth of data we have for every airline. Close and View Airtran Airways ›