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Name: FLIGHT SAFETY FOUNDATION
7JetSet7 Code: FSF
Status: Operational
Region: NORTH AMERICA
City: ALEXANDRIA
Country: USA
Employees
Web: flightsafety.org
Email: jackman@flightsafety.org
Telephone: +1 703.739.6700
Fax: +1 703.739.6708
Sita:
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
FSF-2013-11-UPS-747F

The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) is an independent, non-profit, international organization engaged in research, education, advocacy and publishing to improve aviation safety. The Foundation's mission is to be the leading voice of safety for the global aerospace community.

Since 1947, the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) has helped save lives around the world. The (FSF) is an international non-profit organization whose sole purpose is to provide impartial, independent, expert safety guidance and resources for the aviation and aerospace industry.

The (FSF) is in a unique position to identify global safety issues, set priorities and serve as a catalyst to address the issues through data collection and information sharing, education, advocacy and communications. The (FSF)’s effectiveness in bridging cultural and political differences in the common cause of safety has earned worldwide respect.

Today, membership includes more than >1,000 organizations and individuals in 150 countries. The (FSF) is based in Alexandria, Virginia, USA, has a regional office in Melbourne, Australia, and currently has affiliated organizations throughout the world.

Address:
Headquarters: 801 N. Fairfax Street, Suite 400
Alexandria, Virginia USA 22314-1774

(BARS) Program Office:
Level 6
278 Collins Street
Melbourne VIC 3000 Australia
Telephone: +61 1300.557.162
Fax +61 1300.557.182

* Affiliated Organizations:

Flight Safety Foundation International – (FSFI)
Office 228, 37 Leningradsky pr.
Moscow, 125993 Russia
Tel: +7 495 155 65 35
Fax: +7 495 612 53 03
fsfi@fsfi.civilavia.ru
www.fsfi.avia.ru/en/ (English-language site)

Flight Safety Foundation – West Africa
C/O Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority
Aviation House
Murtala Mohammed Airport
P M B 21029, 21038
Ikeja, Lagos
Nigeria
Tel: +234 1 472 1521
Fax: +234 1 496 3489

Flight Safety Foundation, South East Europe–Middle East–Cyprus
Makariou Avenue 42
Office 303
Larnaca – Cyprus
Tel: +357-99688945
Fax:+357-24621421
info@flightsafety-cy.com
www.flightsafety-cy.com

Flight Safety Foundation – Taiwan
8F-5-1, No. 51 Keelung Road
Sec 2
Taipei, Taiwan, China
Tel: +886 22 377 5829
Fax: +886 22 377 5934
fsft@flightsafety.org.tw


* Leadership:

The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) is a nonprofit organization staffed and managed by a small group of specialists in aviation safety and aviation communications. Operations are overseen by a board of governors, with primary guidance by an executive committee. The board is composed of executives from all segments of the global aviation industry to provide as broad a view of issues as possible. In addition, several standing advisory committees and ad hoc study groups provide focused, detailed direction and assistance in identifying and addressing opportunities for the continual improvement of aviation safety worldwide.


* Board of Governors:

The Board of Governors is the controlling body of Flight Safety Foundation (FSF). The Board comprises about 24 individuals who have extensive experience in aviation and in other industries around the world. The Board sets the policies of the Foundation, determines its agenda and oversees its overall activities. (FSF) staff members report through the (FSF) President to the Board.

Chairman: David McMillan, Director General, Eurocontrol-Belgium

President & (CEO): Captain Kevin L Hiatt, President & Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Flight Safety Foundation

General Counsel & Secretary: Kenneth P Quinn, Partner, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP

Treasurer: David Barger, President & (CEO), JetBlue Airways Corporation

Members:

Mike A Ambrose, Director General, European Regions Airline Association (ERAA)

Steven M Atkins, Former VP Product Integrity & Functional Excellence

William G Bozin, Acting Chief Operating Officer (COO) (2013-12) (FSF).
"We're indebted to Kevin (Hylander)," stated Bozin, "and look forward to continuing our partnership with (IATA), (ICAO), (MITRE), and others, taking the Foundation (FSF) to new heights in the coming years." Bozin previously served for over eight years as VP Safety & Technical Affairs at Airbus Americas; VP Safety & Regulatory Compliance at US Airways (USA); Senior Director, Safety, at the Air Transport Association (now A4A); and over 25 years as a US naval aviator, retiring as Captain and Air Wing Commander.

H O Demuren D Sc, Consultant

Carl Esposito, VP, Honeywell (SGC)

Honorary Robert T Francis, Executive VP, Farragut International

Tay Tiang Guan, Deputy Director General, Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore

Ken Hylander*
* Acting (CEO) & President, (FSF) pending an international executive search (2013-12).
Ken is a retired Senior VP Safety, Security & Compliance at Delta Air Lines (DAL). Prior to his safety leadership role at Delta (DAL), Hylander served as VP Safety & Engineering at Northwest Airlines (NWA) for 11 years, and previously worked at United Airlines (UAL) in a variety of engineering roles. He served most recently as co-chair of the FAA/Industry Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST).

David King, Ph D, Safety & Accident Investigation Centre, Department of Air Transport, Cranfield University

Yannick Malinge, Senior VP & Chief Product Safety Officer, Airbus

William O McCabe, President, The McCabe Group

Dan Mooney, VP, Aviation Safety & Engineering Functions

Captain David Morgan, General Manager, Airline Operations & Safety, Air New Zealand

Ho Ching-Sheng (Danny C. Ho) Chief Executive Vice President, (EVA) Airways Corporation
April 2016: "I am extremely pleased that Danny has agreed to serve on the Board of Governors," said Jon Beatty, (FSF) President & (CEO). "Over the years, Danny has made significant contributions to aviation safety at (EVA) and in his role on the (IAC), and it would be hard to find anyone more qualified to serve on our board."

Captain Linda Orlady, Chief Pilot, Flight Technical & Safety Training, & Flight Services, Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Paolo Pettinaroli, President, Foundation October 8

Michael J Quiello, VP Corporate Safety, Security, Quality & Environment, United Airlines

Cameron Ross, Manager, Aviation Safety, (BHP) Billiton

Douglas Schwartz, Manager Global Aviation Systems, ConocoPhillips Global Aviation Services

Antonio Carlos Vieira Victorazzo, VP Product Integrity, Embraer

Captain Lior Yavor, VP Operations, El Al Israel Airlines

Ex Officio:

Tzvetomir Blajev, Coordinator, Safety Improvement Initiatives
Eurocontrol-Belgium

George M. Ferito, Director Rotorcraft Business Development,
FlightSafety International

Lee Wan-Lee, Chairman, Flight Safety Foundation, Taiwan

Valery G. Shelkovnikov, President, Flight Safety Foundation International (Moscow)

Capt. Akrivos D. Tsolakis, President, Flight Safety Foundation/South Eastern Europe, Cyprus


* Advisory Committees:

The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF)’s activities are influenced by three advisory committees:
A. The International Advisory Committee (IAC)
B. The European Advisory Committee (EAC)
C. The Corporate Advisory Committee (CAC)

These committees are composed of volunteers from specific aviation industry sectors. With regular meetings and occasional special task forces, these groups ensure that the Foundation remains targeted on current issues of concern.

A fourth group: D: The Icarus Committee, often is referred to as the (FSF)’s "think tank." Originally established to explore ways to reduce human factors (HF)–related aviation accidents, the Icarus Committee’s scope spans all aspects of aviation operations of concern to the (FSF).

E: Business Advisory Committee (BAC):

The (FSF) Business Advisory Committee (BAC), one of the committees that help the (FSF) know about current challenges and solutions, addresses the concerns of corporate and business airplane operators. The (BAC) is drawn from (FSF) membership from all segments of the corporate and business aviation industry, including airplane operators, manufacturers, flight training organizations, equipment suppliers, regulators, insurance companies, and academic researchers. The (BAC) typically meets twice annually to identify safety problems, prioritize concerns and seek solutions. The (BAC)’s work is reflected in (FSF) publications and the annual (FSF) Business Aviation Safety Seminar, co-presented by the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA). The (BAC) also may create special task forces to focus on business aviation’s most urgent safety problems.


* Members of Advisory Committees

A. International Advisory Committee (IAC):

The (FSF) International Advisory Committee (IAC), one of the committees that help to keep the (FSF) informed about current challenges and solutions, addresses the concerns of operators of large jets, typically those with 100 seats or more. The (IAC) is drawn from (FSF) membership in all segments of the aviation industry, including airlines and other airplane operators, manufacturers, equipment suppliers, regulators, insurance companies and academic researchers. The (IAC) typically meets twice annually to identify safety problems, prioritize concerns and seek solutions. The committee’s work is reflected in (FSF) publications and in the annual Joint Meeting of the (FSF) International Air Safety Seminar, the International Federation of Airworthiness International Conference and the International Air Transport Association (IATA). The (IAC) also may create special task forces to focus on the world’s most urgent aviation safety problems.

Chairman: Ho Ching-Sheng (Danny C. Ho), Chief Executive Vice President at (EVA) Airways Corporation

Vice Chairman: Captain William Curtis, The Prestige Group

Members:

Joseph Barclay, President & (CEO), In-flight Warning Systems

Captain Victor Breno, Deputy Safety Officer, (TAM) Brazilian Airlines

Ms Susan D'Ath-Weston, Head of Safety, Qantas Airways

Captain Ahmad Zuraidi Dahalan, Senior General Manager, Flight Operations, Malaysia Airlines

Captain Joáo Martins de Abreu, Executive VP Operations & Technical, Liñhas Aéreas de Moçambique

Captain Alex de Silva, Foundation Fellow, Flight Safety Foundation

H O Demuren D Sc, Consultant

Captain Henry Donohoe, Senior VP Safety, Emirates

Martin Eran-Tasker, Technical Director, Association of Asia Pacific Airlines (AAPA)

Captain Jo Gillespie, Partner & Safety Management Advisor, Gates Aviation LLP

Chris Glaeser, Director Global Safety, International Air Transport Association (IATA)

Keith Hagy, Director, Engineering & Air Safety Department
Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), International

Thorgeir Haraldsson, Chief Pilot, Icelandair

Frank Hilldrup, International Specialist, US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)

Bob M Jones, Acting Group Director Safety Regulation, UK Civil Aviation Authority

Captain Juan Carlos Lozano, International Federation of Air Line Pilots' Associations

Captain Réne Márquez, Director Flight Safety, Avianca Airlines

David Mawdsley, Aviation Safety Advisor, Superstructure Group

Paul R Mingler, Chief Consulting Engineer, Product Safety, (GE) Aviation

Captain Hideaki Miyachi, Director, Planning Group, Corporate Safety & Security, Japan Airlines

Harry Nelson, Executive Operational Advisor Product Safety, Airbus

Lou Nemeth, VP Training Services & Chief Safety Officer, (CAE)

Captain Carlos Nunes, Accident Prevention Advisor, (TAP) Air Portugal

Captain Linda Orlady, Chief Pilot, Flight Technical, Safety Training & Flight Services, Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Michel Piers, Director–(NLR) Air Transport Safety Institute, Air Transport Division, (NLR) Air Transport Safety Institute

Igor Piskovoy, Director, Flight Training, AirBridgeCargo Airlines

Captain Robert Schroeder, Flight Safety Officer, Lufthansa German Airlines

Captain George H Snyder, President & (CEO), (GHS) Aviation Group

Jia-Minn Sun, VP Corporate Safety Division, China Airlines

James E Terpstra, Senior Corporate VP (retired), Flight Information Technology & Aviation Affairs, Jeppesen

Ex Officio:

Tzvetomir Blajev, Coordinator, Safety Improvement Initiatives
Eurocontrol-Belgium

George M Ferito, Director Rotorcraft Business Development, FlightSafety International

Alternates:

Captain Hilmar B Baldursson, Chief Pilot, Icelandair

Chris Baum, Manager, Engineering & Operations, Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), International

William G Bozin, VP Safety & Technical Affairs, Airbus

Captain Michael F Coker, Senior Safety Pilot, Flight Technical & Safety, Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Tom Hamilton, Head External Relations, Office of the Group Director
UK Civil Aviation Authority

Geraldo Cosa de Meneses, Director Safety, TAM Brazilian Airlines

Walter Y T Tai, Assistant VP Safety, Security & Compliance Division
China Airlines


B. European Advisory Committee (EAC):

The (FSF) European Advisory Committee (EAC), one of the committees that help to keep the (FSF) informed about current challenges and solutions, addresses the concerns of airlines, regional airlines and corporate operators in Europe. The (EAC) is drawn from (FSF) membership in all segments of the aviation industry, including airlines and other airplane operators, manufacturers, equipment suppliers, regulators, insurance companies and academic researchers. The (EAC) typically meets twice annually to identify safety problems, prioritize concerns and seek solutions. The (EAC)’s work is reflected in (FSF) publications and the annual (FSF) European Aviation Safety Seminar, co-presented by the European Regions Airline Association (ERA) and Eurocontrol. The (EAC) also may create special task forces to focus on this region’s most urgent aviation safety problems.

Chairman: Tzvetomir Blajev, Coordinator, Safety Improvement Initiatives, Eurocontrol-Belgium

Vice Chairman: Captain Stephen Eggenschwiler, Senior Manager, Swiss International Air Lines

Members:

Giuseppe Daniele Carrabba, Airports Coordination Director, (ENAC)-Ente Nazionale Aviazione Civile

Captain Martin Chalk, President, European Cockpit Association

Tom Curran, Chief Air Safety Investigator, Aer Lingus

Captain Hans-Joachim Ebermann, Vereinigung Cockpit - German Air Line Pilots' Association

Colin Gill, Head of (ATM) Standards, Air Traffic Standards Division,
UK Civil Aviation Authority

Gerhard Gruber, Manager, Rescue & Airport Operations, Vienna International Airport

Reto P Inderbitzin, Claims Manager, Global Aerospace

Ratan Khatwa Ph D, Senior Chief Engineer, Human Factors, Honeywell

Captain Péter Koloszár, Professor, Budapest University of Technology

Michel Masson, Ph D, Safety Action Coordinator, European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)

Dragos Munteanu, Head of Flight Safety & Quality Department, TAROM Romanian Air Transport

Harry Nelson, Executive Operational Advisor to Product Safety, Airbus

N Aydin Özkazanç, Flight Safety Officer, Turkish Airlines

Robert Peel, Manager Air Safety and Operations, European Regions Airline Association (ERAA)

Captain Ed Pooley, Principal Consultant, The Air Safety Consultancy

Arturo Radini ,Chairman, Technical Task Force, 8 October 2001 Foundation

José Enrique Román, Engineering & Programs Director, Boeing Research & Technology, Europe

Alex Rutten, Operations Manager, (NLR) Air Transport Safety Institute
(NLR) Air Transport Safety Institute

Captain Matthias Schmid, Managing Director, Saferflight Ltd.

Captain Louis Crispin Simmons, International Safety Liason, Independent Pilots Association

Jean-Jacques Speyer, Professor, Vrije Universiteit, Brussels

Captain Akrivos D Tsolakis, President, Flight Safety Foundation/South Eastern Europe, Cyprus

Dick J van Eck, Former General Manager (ATM) Training, Air Traffic Control (ATC), The Netherlands

Air Commodore Dai Whittingham, Chief Executive (CEO), U K Flight Safety Committee, Ex Officio

George M Ferito, Director Rotorcraft Business Development, FlightSafety International

Ho Ching-Sheng (Danny C Ho), Chief Executive Vice President, (EVA) Airways Corporation

Alternates:

Captain Giuseppe Borgna, VP Alitalia-Compagnia Aerea Italiana S.p.A.

Gerald Dailloux, Flight Safety VP, Dassault Aviation


D. Icarus Committee:

Created in 1992 to explore ways of reducing human factors (HF)–related aviation accidents, the Icarus Committee’s scope of interest since has expanded into many other safety fields as it became (FSF)’s “think tank.” The committee (a small, informal group of recognized international aviation specialists) augments the (FSF)’s core activities, posing questions and suggesting actions to the board and, through the governors, to the worldwide aviation community. Several major (FSF) projects have been launched based on the Icarus Committee’s recommendations.

Safety systems and attitudes toward safety have been within the range of the committee’s concern. An Icarus project on the criminalization of aviation safety developed to the point of playing a significant role in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)’s overhaul of its Annex 13, providing guidance to the nations of the world for protecting aviation safety functions from the negative effects of judicial activities.

The name “Icarus” was chosen for its symbolic value. In Greek mythology, Icarus flew with wings made by his father, Daedalus, of wax and feathers. However, when he ventured too close to the sun the wax melted and he plunged into the sea. Icarus was the first pilot (FC) to suffer an accident because of his incorrect behavior, ignorance of the operational environment and design deficiencies.

Chairperson: Captain Linda Orlady, Chief Pilot, Flight Technical & Safety Training & Flight Services, Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Vice Chairperson: Kathy Abbott Ph D, Chief Scientific & Technical Advisor, Flight Deck Human Factors, USA Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

Members:

Captain Bertrand de Courville, Head, Flight Safety, AirFrance

Elizabeth Erickson, President

Hon Robert T Francis, Executive VP Farragut International

R Curtis Graeber Ph D, Senior Technical Fellow, Chief Engineer, Human Factors, Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Peter Griffiths, Director General Civil Aviation, UK Civil Aviation Authority

Ho Ching-Sheng (Danny C Ho), Chief Executive Vice President, (EVA) Airways

Edwin Hutchins Ph D, Professor of Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego

Fang Jun, Coordinator for International Safety Programs, Office of Aviation Safety, General Administration of Civil Aviation of China

Lajun Liu, Director General for Safety, General Administration of Civil Aviation of China

Captain Dan Maurino, Coordinator, Flight Safety & Human Factors Study Program, International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)

Yurt Mochalin, Flight Safety Officer

Edward Armstrong Rogan, Aviation Solutions Director, Superstructure Group

John W Saul, Executive Director, International Federation of Air Line Pilots' Associations

Douglas Schwartz, Manager of Global Aviation Systems, ConocoPhillips Global Aviation Services

Captain Etienne Tarnowski, Experimental Test Pilot, Chair, Human Factors Test Group, Airbus Americas, Inc.

Kay Yong Ph D, Director, Aviation Safety Council (retired) Taiwan, China

Governors Emeriti:

John H Enders, Past President, Flight Safety Foundation

Stuart Matthews, Past President, Flight Safety Foundation


E: Business Advisory Committee (BAC):

Chairman: Peter N Stein, Director, Flight Operations–Aviation,
Johnson Controls.

Members:

Peter V Agur Jr, Managing Director & Founder, VanAllen Group Inc

Thomas Anthony, Director, Aviation Safety & Security Program, University of Southern California

Mark A Arpino, Corporate Safety Manager, MassMutual Financial Group

Captain David Belastock, Demo Pilot/Captain, Dassault Falcon Jet

David M Bjellos, Aviation Manager, Florida Crystals Corp.

Robert Blouin, VP Flight Operations, Hawker Beechcraft Corp.

Richard D Boyer, Manager Aviation/Pilot, (SCANA) Corporation

John T Brogan, VP & Manager, New York General Aviation Office,
United States Aviation Underwriters

Steve Brown, Senior VP Operations, National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

Michael Buchanan, Director Flight Operations, American General Life Companies

Patrick H Chiles, Manager Operations & Technical Support, NetJets

Captain John Fare, Aviation Safety Manager, Johnson & Johnson

George M Ferito, Director Rotorcraft Business Development,
FlightSafety International

Captain James W Hrubes, Director Aviation, Monsanto Aircraft Operations

James D Kelly, Aviation Safety Manager, Pfizer

Richard Kunert, VP Safety, Standards & Regulatory Affairs, Jet Aviation

Captain Francois Lassale, President Vortex (FSM), LLC

Roger C M Lee, Director of Corporate Safety & Quality, Metrojet Ltd

Captain David McElroy, Captain Twin Otter/CASA 212, Aviation Safety Committee, ConocoPhillips Global Aviation Services

Dan Ramirez, Specialist, Air Safety, Embraer

Robert S Rothwell, General Counsel — Subsidiary Operations,
Dassault Falcon Jet

Jeffrey A Sands, Senior Director, Aviation & Travel Services,
Altria Client Services

Lisa A Sasse, Director, Corporate Strategies, VisionSafe Corporation

Captain Marc A Sehrt, G-IV Captain, Safety Manager, (ZBI) Aviation Services

Keith C Shelburn, Director, Aviation, DuPont

Quay C Snyder M D, (MSPH) President & (CEO), Virtual Flight Surgeons

Edward J Stockhausen, Director Safety, Air Methods

John H Thomas, National VP, Key Accounts, Jet Aviation

Neil Vernon, Director, Demonstration Corporate Transport, Gulfstream Aerospace

Edward R Williams, (CEO) Metropolitan Aviation Group, (LLC)

Terry Yaddaw, President & (CEO), Aerospace Training Technologies
Ex Officio

Tzvetomir Blajev, Coordinator, Safety Improvement Initiatives,
Eurocontrol-Belgium

Ho Ching-Sheng (Danny C Ho), Chief Executive Vice President, (EVA) Airways, Corporation

Rudy Quevedo, Director, Global Programs, Flight Safety Foundation


January 2014: The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) said 2013 was the safest year in a decade for commercial air transport. According to (EASA), there were 17 fatal accidents worldwide last year involving large commercial air transport airplanes, compared to a yearly average of 27, which was fewer than any other year in the last decade. As a result, there was also a significant decrease in the number of fatalities worldwide, down to 224 in 2013, compared to a yearly average of 703 between 2003 and 2012.

There were no fatal accidents involving large commercial air transport airplanes in (EASA) member states in 2013, despite the region’s airlines operating some six million commercial air transport flights carrying more than >800 million passengers.

(EASA) Executive Director, Patrick Ky said: “Europe continues to have one of the strongest safety records in the world; however, this positive picture cannot be taken for granted. As traffic over European skies and worldwide increases, we need to continue our efforts to maintain and even improve aviation safety.”

These efforts include the European Aviation Safety Plan, which connects safety issues identified with actions and initiatives launched to address the underlying risks, and the (EASA) Annual Safety Review, which provides an overview of aviation safety in Europe covering all major sectors of aviation, from commercial air transport to general aviation and aerodrome and air traffic safety.

May 2014: The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) has a new President & (CEO), Jon Beatty, who until recently held the same positions with International Aero Engines (IAE). He comes to the aviation safety advocate with solid manufacturing industry experience, having begun his career as a quality engineer with Sikorsky. He was confirmed in his post in April and is now heading up (FSF)'s efforts to promote further advances in flight safety.

One of the foundation's top concerns is go-arounds, not just the lack of pilots (FC) actually performing the maneuver, but also how poorly many of those pilots (FC) handle this seldom-used event. The (FSF) (Booth 1315), in conjunction with 15 other aviation organizations, studied the issue and in June 2013 released findings about the true risks of a lack of pilot proficiency.

A recent survey of 2,500 working pilots (FC) showed 96% of approaches are stable. Of the other 4%, however, almost none were terminated with the airplane performing a go-around, a maneuver the (FSF) calls a part of normal, everyday flying. "We have a pretty good protocol right now for how we fly approaches," Beatty told (AIN). "What is less well documented is when to make a go-around decision. The most recent accidents [Asiana (AAR) 214 and (UPS) 1354] have both involved approach and landing [configurations]."

Experts agree that, at least in the case of the Asiana Airlines (AAR) July 2013 crash in San Francisco, a timely go-around would have prevented the accident. The data has not yet been released on last August's (UPS) crash in Birmingham, Alabama. "There are now more than >40,000 copies of the (FSF)'s approach and landing accident reduction toolkit in use around the world," added Beatty. "We're working on an update to that toolkit right now." The foundation plans to release the findings this year of that additional survey on go-arounds, which was initiated in 2012.

Also among the top three concerns for the foundation and its new (CEO) is enabling data sharing, while also maximizing data protection. The (FSF) is working with Mitre, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the International Air Transport Organization (IATA) to develop the ability to share data and apply analytics to solutions to help improve aviation's already outstanding safety record. The (FSF) also co-chairs the (ICAO) task force on safety information protection intended to establish legal guidelines to protect data from punitive use, except in the case of gross negligence of illegal activity. "Data will, of course, set us free," said Beatty. "But up until now, there has always been a lot of data that people don't want to share because they're fearful of what might happen to it. Right now, (ICAO) has some of the information and (IATA) also has some. The world would be a better place [if we could all see the data], but one of the obstacles is that lack of a common database. So many individuals treat this information as proprietary. I think we should be comparing ourselves to the industry, not our competitors."

The (FSF)'s goal is to help create a system where the data is cleansed so that only the relevant facts appear, and the person or company sharing that data is unidentified. "We need to give all organizations a vision of how overall industry safety could be improved if we can raised the bar on everyone," stated Beatty.

The (FSF) is also quite proud of its safety audit arm, which is known as the basic aviation risk standards (BARS) program and is based in the organization's regional office in Melbourne, Australia. The (FSF) created these specialized audits to assist operators in the natural resources sector and other remote operations. The (BARS) program benefits all companies that contract airplane operators to carry people, so each can focus on safe operations, not redundant audits.

Despite only now getting used to his new desk in the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) office in Alexandria, Virginia, (AIN) asked Beatty if he had a dream for what the foundation could become. "I like a version of the Boy Scout motto for this," he said. "I hope to make the (FSF) a better organization by the time I leave than the way I found it when I arrived. I think the (FSF) brings the voice of reason to this industry. We're the only pure safety organization that exists. I think we make a perfect third leg to the three-legged stool of manufacturers and regulators."

July 2014: The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) has called for a high-level Ministerial summit, criminal responsibility, in the wake of the shooting down of Malaysia Airlines (MAS) 777-200 on Flight MH17 in Ukraine.

The (FSF) requested that the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) call for a High-Level Ministerial meeting to review the systems in place to warn airlines of hostile airspace and take action in response to the shoot down of Malaysia Airlines (MAS) 17 in the Ukraine, and for authorities to bring criminal prosecutions against those who brought down the 777 airplane and interfered with the investigation. "This tragically unfolding affront to safety, security, and humanity must be dealt with swiftly and surely by the international aviation community and law enforcement," said Jon Beatty, President & (CEO) of the Flight Safety Foundation.

"Where known threats to civil aviation exist, States should assess and widely publish this information, or close the airspace. If States cannot discharge their responsibilities to manage their airspace safely, (ICAO) should play a leading role to alerting or prohibiting airlines from flying through known, hostile airspace," Beatty further stated.

"The failure to secure the wreckage, the refusal to grant full and unimpeded access to investigators, the delay in turning over the cockpit voice recorder (CVR) and digital flight data recorder (FDR), and the inhumane treatment of MH 17 victims' remains represent appalling acts of inhumanity and interference," Beatty continued. "Those obstructing this investigation should be held criminally responsible. (ICAO) investigators must be given immediate and unimpeded access to the site.

While noting that the (FSF) is often against the criminalization of aviation accidents, Beatty stated: "Let's be clear: this is now a crime scene, not an accident scene; the perpetrators of this barbaric act of sabotage, must be held criminally responsible."

"If States are unwilling or unable to discharge their responsibilities in the wake of a downed civil airplane, (ICAO) must be ready and able to assert control over the investigation," Beatty concluded.

August 2014: Independent aviation safety body, the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) is backing the use of deployable flight data recorders (FDRs), or triggered flight data transmission, as the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines (MAS) 777 from Flight MH370 continues.

The (FSF) is close to releasing a two-year study into airplane go-arounds, performed by social science research specialist, Presage.

August 2014: The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) announced that Greg Marshall has joined the headquarters in Virginia as the new Acting VP for Global Programs. He will start in this role on September 2, 2014.

Greg has worked as the Director of the (FSF)'s Basic Aviation Risk Standard (BARS) program in the Melbourne office since 2010. In that role, he has overseen the dramatic growth and evolution of the BARS program into the leading audit standard for the mining and resources segment of the industry.

"Bringing Greg to the home office to help during this transition will allow for great synergy between the (BARS) program and the other technical programs that the (FSF) does," stated (FSF) President & (CEO), Jon Beatty. "We have a proud tradition of technical work improving aviation safety, and Greg's arrival will ensure that this continues and expands."

As VP for Global Programs, Greg will continue to oversee the (BARS) program and also lead the technical work of the (FSF) as a whole. Dave Anderson, currently the Audit Manager of (BARS), will be responsible for the day to day operations of (BARS) and the Melbourne office.

"This is the perfect opportunity for me to continue to develop the connection between (BARS) and the all the technical work at the (FSF)," commented Greg. "This will be a win-win for the (BARS) and (FSF) members, as it will lead to new technical opportunities and initiatives.

Greg will be replacing Rudy Quevedo, former Director of Global Programs, who is leaving the Flight Safety Foundation to join the International Air Transport Association (IATA) (ITA) as the Director of Safety.

April 2015: The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) announced the hiring of Mark Millam as its new VP Technical. In this role, Mr Millam takes on the lead responsibility for managing the (FSF)'s Global Safety Information Project (GSIP).

Prior to joining (FSF), Mr Millam worked at Airlines for America (A4A) as the Managing Director Safety. He served in that position since 2013 after 30 years in Airline Operations and Safety. "Mark brings a safety background and knowledge of working with the (FAA) that will assist us in our (GSIP) project," stated Jon L Beatty, President & (CEO), (FSF). "We are very pleased to have someone with his background come on board."

(FSF) also announced that Christopher Rochette, (CMM), has joined the staff as Senior Manager Events & Marketing. Mr Rochette will be responsible for the Logistics & Marketing of all of the (FSF)'s seminars and events, including the two largest, Business Aviation Safety Summit (BASS) and International Air Safety Summit (IASS). He has 19 years of experience working in global, non-profit environments. "With Chris' expertise in conference planning and marketing, we look forward to his new ideas and leadership in making (FSF)'s safety summits and conferences even better than they are now," Beatty stated.

In addition to the new hires, (FSF) announced several promotions. Greg Marshall has been named VP Global Programs and will divide his time between managing (FSF)'s Basic Aviation Risk Standard (BARS) program, which he has been managing for several years, and providing technical expertise for (FSF).

Frank Jackman, who joined (FSF) in April of 2012 after 25 years at Aviation Week, has been named the new VP Communications. He will be responsible for overseeing all of (FSF) external communications, including AeroSafety World, the website and managing the new partnership with SKYbrary.

Susan Lausch is promoted to VP Business Operations. Ms Lausch, who joined (FSF) in 2009, will continue to run the membership and seminars department. She coordinates other (FSF) efforts including; fundraising and the benefit dinner, as well as Marketing/Branding efforts.

"With our new hires and the new structure of (FSF), I am confident that we have the right team in place," Jon Beatty stated.

July 2015: News Item A-1: The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) announced today that it will hold an initial series of focus groups this month as part of a multi-year study concerning safety data collection and processing systems within two key regions: Asia-Pacific and Pan-America.

The first Asia-Pacific workshops will take place in Wellington, New Zealand (July 2); Sydney, Australia (July 6); Singapore (July 8); Hong Kong (July 10) and Tokyo, Japan (July 13). Pan-American focus groups are scheduled for Mexico City, Mexico (July 20 - 21) and Panama City, Panama (July 23 - 24). Additional dates and locations are available from the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF).

In addition, informational sessions aligned with regional aviation safety groups throughout the two key regions will be held to promote all aspects of the project. One was held in Medellin, Colombia on June 22 - 25, with a second planned for Lima, Peru on July 9 - 10.

The Global Safety Information Project (GSIP) is a first-of-its-kind effort that seeks information pertaining to safety data collection and processing from aviation industry stakeholders within the key regions. "(GSIP) represents an initial strategic attempt to apply the best practices of knowledge management on the critical challenges of flight safety data," (FSF) Technical VP, Mark Millam said. "Current efforts, such as this month's focus groups, are part of a preliminary discovery phase. They can serve as the building blocks for a future system in which all data pertinent to flight safety, regardless of the geographic location for collection, can be collated with similar types of information and formatted into useful intelligence."

The key outcome from the focus groups will be to identify how many entities collect safety data, how the data is collected and processed and how the results of that data collection and processing are applied to promote aviation safety. "As the number of flight safety statistics increases, improved collection of and access to data becomes more imperative; however there isn't really a comprehensive knowledge management approach yet to correlate world wide flight safety data," Millam said.

The collection and analysis of safety information is a key component of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) global aviation safety plan. Funded through an (FAA) cooperative agreement, (GSIP) seeks to establish what types of safety information and data are captured by each of the key stakeholders within the two study regions and how this is managed to enhance aviation safety. Project activities will include the development of a globally focused toolkit to be used by states to develop and implement voluntary safety reporting programs that include protections against punitive action by regulatory agencies and/or employers, as allowed by the respective national law.

News Item A-2: The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) announced that David Anderson has been named the new Managing Director of (FSF)'s Basic Aviation Risk Standard (BARS) program. Anderson has been the Audit Manager for the (BARS) program for the past four years. He brings more than >34 years of experience in the aviation industry. The (BARS) program is run out of (FSF)'s Melbourne, Australia, office.

Mr Anderson started his aviation career as an apprentice mechanic in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). He progressed to aircraft mechanic and then flight engineer, a position he held with the (RAAF) and with a commercial carrier. He holds a commercial pilot's (FC) license and is a lead auditor with experience with (BARS), (IOSA), (ISAGO), and (QMS) audit protocols.

Greg Marshall, who had been the (BARS) Managing Director for the past four years, recently moved to Alexandria, Virginia, to become (FSF)'s VP Global Programs.

"David Anderson will be a great leader for the (BARS) program. His background in safety and quality management, plus his years of working in the (BARS) office, makes him an excellent choice to take on this leadership role and continue (BARS)' growth," stated Jon L Beatty, President & (CEO) of (FSF). "As an added bonus, Greg Marshall will continue to assist the business development of the (BARS) program, as well as his work as the (FSF) VP Global Programs."

December 2015: "2015 was the Safest Year Ever According to Aviation Safety Network (ASN) Data" December 28, 2015.

The Aviation Safety Network (ASN) released the preliminary 2015 airliner accident statistics showing a record low total of 16 fatal airliner accidents, resulting in 560 fatalities.

Despite several high profile accidents, the year 2015 turned out to be a very safe year for commercial aviation, Aviation Safety Network (ASN) data show.

Over the year 2015, the (ASN) recorded a total of 16 fatal airliner accidents, resulting in 560 fatalities. This makes 2015 the safest year ever by number of fatal accidents and the 5th safest year ever in terms of fatalities. Most accidents involved passenger flights (7). Given the expected worldwide air traffic of 34,000,000 flights, the accident rate is 1 fatal passenger flight accident per 4,857,000 flights.

The worst accident this year happened on October 31, when a Metrojet (KLV) Airbus A321 crashed in the Sinai Desert, killing all 224.

The low number of accident airplanes comes as no surprise, according to (ASN) President Harro Ranter: "Since 1997, the average number of airliner accidents has shown a steady and persistent decline, for a great deal thanks to the continuing safety-driven efforts by the international aviation organizations such as (ICAO), (IATA), the Flight Safety Foundation and the aviation industry."

2 out of 16 accidents were operated by airlines on the European Union (EU) "black list."

Statistics are based on a selection of worldwide fatal accidents involving civil aircraft with a minimum capacity of 14 passengers.

April 2016: The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) announced that Danny C Ho Chief Executive Vice President at (EVA) Air, has been elected to the (FSF)'s Board of Governors. Ho, a long time member and Chairman of (FSF)'s International Advisory Committee (IAC), is responsible for corporate safety, security and environment management, and oversees various functions in flight operations at (EVA).

"I am extremely pleased that Danny has agreed to serve on the Board of Governors," said Jon Beatty, (FSF) President & (CEO). "Over the years, Danny has made significant contributions to aviation safety at (EVA) and in his role on the (IAC), and it would be hard to find anyone more qualified to serve on our board."

Members of the Foundation's Board of Governors are elected to an initial 3-year term and can be re-elected 2x-. The Board comprises up to 35 safety professionals and executives from around the world and across different sectors of the aviation industry. In addition to the elected members, the chairs of the various Foundation advisory committees serve as ex-officio members of the board.

(EVA) Air, a benefactor member of the Foundation, operates a mixed fleet of 70 Airbus and Boeing passenger jets and freighters serving 65 destinations on 4 continents.

September 2016: "Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) Urges Independent Criminal Probe of MH17 Shoot-Down."

The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) released the following statement on the results of a 2-year Dutch-led investigation into the July 17, 2014, downing of Malaysia Airlines (MAS) Flight MH17 over eastern Ukraine in which 298 passengers and crew were killed.

"The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) often has been in the forefront of opposing efforts to essentially criminalize honest mistakes in aviation that happen to have catastrophic consequences," said President & (CEO) Jon Beatty. "In the case of MH17, however, evidence is mounting that this shoot-down of a civilian aircraft was a premeditated act, where criminal investigation and prosecution may well be appropriate if authorities find out who knew about or gave the command to fire a deadly missile at this plane. We urge all states to cooperate fully in this investigation. Also, because Russia claims the Joint Investigation Team to be biased and difficulty remains in obtaining all evidence, we again call on all states to support a resolution at the (UN) Security Council to form an independent, international panel to fully investigate this tragedy. The 298 souls on board MH17 and their loved ones deserve nothing less."

The investigative report by a team of prosecutors from the Netherlands, Australia, Belgium, Malaysia and Ukraine says evidence indicates that the (MAS) Boeing 777 was brought down by a Buk missile taken across the Ukrainian border from Russia, according to multiple media reports. Investigators also said that the Buk missile launcher later was returned to Russia.

February 2017: News Item A-1: ACCDT: A Flybe (BEE) Bombardier Dash 8-Q400 (PW150A) (4136, /06 G-JECP) twin turboprop suffered a landing accident at Amsterdam Schiphol International Airport (AMS) on February 23. (AMS) confirmed on its website, “The landing gear of a Flybe (BEE) airplane collapsed during touchdown at the Oostbaan at Schiphol around 17.00 hr. There were 59 people on the plane. Nobody was injured. The cause of the incident is being investigated.”

According to the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF)’s Aviation Safety Network (ASN), the aircraft “departed Edinburgh, Scotland, on a scheduled passenger service to Amsterdam at 14:21 (UTC). About 15:22 (UTC), the aircraft entered a holding pattern over the North Sea off the western coast of the Netherlands. It left the holding about 15:38 (UTC) and positioned for an approach to runway 22. The aircraft touched down about 15:54 (UTC).”

The (ASN) went on to say that “videos from the occurrence show that, during landing roll-out, the right hand main landing gear slowly folded back in. The aircraft came to rest on the runway with the right hand wing tip contacting the ground. The flight crew (FC) issued a mayday call after the accident and subsequently issued another mayday call, stating that they were evacuating the aircraft due to smoke in the cabin.”

The airport was experiencing high wind gusts through the day, though it is not clear if the weather affected the aircraft’s landing. Wind at the time of the landing was recorded as being from 240 degrees at 31 knots, gusting to 46 knots, according to (ASN).

A Flybe (BEE) spokesperson said: “Following the incident at Amsterdam Schiphol, all 59 passengers who were on board Flybe (BEE) flight BE1284 have now continued their journeys. There were no injuries in the incident, which happened shortly after the Bombardier Dash 8 Q-400 landed at Schiphol Airport at 1659 local time.”

(BEE) (CEO) Christine Ourmieres-Widener said in a Twitter post February 23, “Our highest priority is the safety and well-being of our passengers and crew. Our pilots (FC) regularly train for situations such as this in simulators at our training academy in Exeter. Our cabin crews (CA) are also fully trained to deal with these situations professionally. We have sent a specialist to offer assistance to the investigation and we will now do all we can to understand the cause of this incident.”

The Dutch Safety Board is expected to investigate the incident.

April 2017: News Item A-1: "(FAA) Issued Safety Bulletin on (PED)s after USA Carry-on Ban" by Karen Walker Karen.walker@penton.com, April 7, 2017.

The (FAA) has issued a Safety Information Bulletin (SIB) related to the new security bans on most personal electronics in carry-on bags on certain flights, but is not making that (SIB) public.

An (FAA) spokesperson confirmed questions that the (FAA) issued the (SIB) when the USA Department of Homeland Security implemented its ban on passenger personal electronic devices (PEDs) larger than smartphones in the cabin on direct flights from 10 airports (most of them in the Middle East) to the USA.

That ban, introduced in March, was followed by a similar security rule by the UK government, although the British ban applies to direct flights to the UK from 6 countries and the affected airports do not align with the USA list.

USA government officials, when briefing media on the new rules March 20, said they were aware of fire safety concerns that the new rules raise because it leads to larger numbers of lithium battery-powered (PED)s being loaded into the cargo holds of affected airlines. They said they were “coordinating very closely” with the (FAA) about how to implement the new security rules while maintaining airplane safety.

But the (FAA)’s response on April 7 indicates the (FAA) did more than coordinate and advise (it issued a (SIB) at the time of the ban). “The (FAA) issued a (SIB) when the (DHS) made the original announcement. The (EASA) and (ICAO) related bulletins were based on language in the original (FAA) bulletin,” the spokesperson said. That is a reference to subsequent bulletins from (ICAO) and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The (EASA)’s bulletin, issued earlier this week, describes (PED)s as “dangerous goods” in the cargo hold. “Certain precautions should therefore be observed to mitigate the risk of accidental fire in the cargo hold. In particular, (PED)s placed in checked baggage must be completely switched off and well protected from accidental activation,” (EASA) said.

A USA aviation safety advocacy organization also joined those agencies in raising concerns about potential fire hazard risks caused by the USA and UK bans.

The Washington DC-base Flight Safety Foundation (FSF), an independent, nonprofit, international organization, issued a statement warning that the bans “significantly increase the number of (PED)s carried in cargo holds” and urging the industry to “fully consider the consequential risk” associated with that change. “There have been occasions when the lithium batteries in (PED)s have suffered thermal runaway and caught fire. To mitigate this risk, cabin crew has been trained in how to manage these situations. With the transport of (PED)s on certain flights now restricted to the cargo hold, along with other potentially flammable items within checked-in baggage, a known and managed risk has effectively been transferred to another part of the aircraft where, should thermal runaway occur, it is rendered inaccessible to cabin crew,” the (FSF) stated.

Like (EASA), (FSF) emphasized that devices are placed in checked baggage must be powered off, be protected from accidental activation, and be protected from damage, but added, “the risk, however, that some of these items may be left on cannot be overlooked.”

Fleet:
(definitions)

September 2017:

The Flight Safety Foundation is an independent, non-profit, international organization engaged in research, education, advocacy and publishing to improve aviation safety. The Foundation's mission is to be the leading voice of safety for the global aerospace community.

Management:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
FSF-5-FRANK JACKMAN - 2013-11

JEROME F "JERRY" LEDERER, FOUNDER.

OFFICERS & STAFF:

* BOARD OF GOVERNORS — OFFICERS:

KEN HYLANDER, CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD.
Ken was the retired Senior VP Safety, Security & Compliance at Delta Air Lines (DAL). Prior to his safety leadership role at Delta (DAL), Hylander served as VP Safety & Engineering at Northwest Airlines (NWA) for 11 years, and previously worked at United Airlines (UAL) in a variety of engineering roles. He previously served as co-chair of the (FAA)/Industry Commercial Aviation Safety Team (CAST).

JON BEATTY, PRESIDENT & (CEO) (2014-05).
Jon became President & (CEO) of the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) in April, 2014. In this position, he oversees all operations of the Foundation (an international non-profit founded in 1947 in order to advance aviation safety). Prior to joining the Foundation, Jon was President & (CEO), International Aero Engines (IAE) a division of United Technologies Corporation (UTX) from 2007 – 2009 and again from
2012 – 2013. (IAE) powers over >200 customers operating in 95 countries.

Jon was also an (IAE) Executive Board Member. Jon was the Pratt & Whitney (PRW) Senior Vice President, Airline Customers responsible for Global Sales Marketing & Customer Support building and sustaining relationships, Commercial Engines & Global Services.

He was also Pratt & Whitney (PRW) Vice President for Operational Commercial Engine Programs, where he carried responsibility for all in-service commercial engine programs with over >14,000 engines operating worldwide.

He was a member of the Pratt & Whitney (PRW) Safety Board. Before joining (PRW), Jon was VP, Programs & Marketing at BF Goodrich (BFG),
responsible for Commercial & Military Programs. Earlier he worked at Allied Signal as General Manager with responsibility for Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Production & Multiple Overhaul and Repair Facilities. He started his career at Sikorsky Aircraft as a Quality Engineer.

KENNETH P QUINN, ESQ, GENERAL COUNNSEL & SECRETARY.

DAVID BARGER, TREASURER.


* FLIGHT SAFETY FOUNDATION STAFF:


ADMINISTRATIVE:

MS STEPHANIE MACK, MANAGER SUPPORT SERVICES & EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT
mack@flightsafety.org (ext. 100)


TECHNICAL:

MARK MILLAM, SENIOR VP TECHNICAL (2015-04).
Mark took on the lead responsibility for managing the (FSF)'s Global Safety Information Project (GSIP).

GREG MARSHALL, VP GLOBAL PROGRAMS (2015-04).
Greg has worked as the Director of the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF)'s Basic Aviation Risk Standard (BARS) program in the Melbourne office since 2010. In that role, he has overseen the dramatic growth and evolution of the (BARS) program into the leading audit standard for the mining and resources segment of the industry.

"Bringing Greg to the home office in Alexandria, Virginia to help during this transition, will allow for great synergy between the (BARS) program and the other technical programs that the (FSF) does," stated (FSF) President & (CEO), Jon Beatty. "We have a proud tradition of technical work improving aviation safety and Greg's arrival will ensure that this continues and expands."

As VP for Global Programs, Greg Marshall will continue to oversee the (BARS) program and also lead the technical work of the Foundation as a whole. Dave Anderson, currently the Audit Manager of (BARS), will be responsible for the day to day operations of (BARS) and the Melbourne office.

"This is the perfect opportunity for me to continue to develop the connection between (BARS) and the all the technical work at the Flight Safety Foundation (FSF)," commented Greg. "This will be a win-win for the (BARS) and (FSF) members, as it will lead to new technical opportunities and initiatives. Greg replaced Rudy Quevedo, former Director of Global Programs, who left the (FSF) to join the International Air Transport Association (IATA) (ITA) as the Director of Safety.

DAVID ANDERSON, MANAGING DIRECTOR BASIC AVIATION RISK STANDARD (BARS) PROGRAM, BASED IN MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA.
David has been the Audit Manager for the (BARS) program for the past four years. He brings more than >34 years of experience in the aviation industry.

David started his aviation career as an apprentice mechanic in the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). He progressed to aircraft mechanic (MT) and then flight engineer, a position he held with the (RAAF) and with a commercial carrier. He holds a commercial pilot's (FC) license and is a lead auditor with experience with (BARS), (IOSA), (ISAGO), and (QMS) audit protocols.

David Anderson will continue to be a great leader for the (BARS) program. His background in safety and quality management, plus his years of working in the (BARS) office, makes him an excellent choice to take on this leadership role and continue (BARS)' growth," stated Jon L Beatty, President & (CEO) of (FSF). "As an added bonus, Greg Marshall will continue to assist the business development of the (BARS) program, as well as his work as the (FSF) VP Global Programs.


COMMUNICATIONS:

FRANK JACKMAN, VP COMMUNICATIONS (2015-04).
Frank was formerly Director Publications & Editor-in-Chief
"AeroSafety World." Frank is now responsible for overseeing all of (FSF) external communications, including AeroSafety World, the website and managing the new partnership with SKYbrary.
jackman@flightsafety.org
+1 (703) 739-6700, ext. 116.

MS EMILY MCGEE, DIRECTOR COMMUNICATIONS
mcgee@flightsafety.org
+1 (703) 739-6700, ext. 126.


MEMBERSHIP & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT:

MS SUSAN M LAUSCH, VP BUSINESS OPERATIONS (2015-04).
Susan was previously Senior Director Membership & Business Development. She joined (FSF) in 2009, and will continue to run the membership and seminars department. She coordinates other (FSF) efforts including; fundraising and the benefit dinner, as well as Marketing/Branding efforts.
lausch@flightsafety.org (ext. 112)

KELCEY MITCHELL, DIRECTOR EVENTS & SEMINARS
mitchell@flightsafety.org (ext. 105)

CHRISTOPHER ROCHETTE, SENIOR MANAGER EVENTS & MARKETING (2015-04)
Christopher will be responsible for the Logistics & Marketing of all of the (FSF)'s seminars and events, including the two largest, Business Aviation Safety Summit (BASS) and International Air Safety Summit (IASS). He has 19 years of experience working in global, non-profit environments.

NAMRATHA APPARAO, SEMINAR & EXHIBIT COORDINATOR
apparao@flightsafety.org (ext. 101)

AHLAM WAHDAN, MEMBERSHIP SERVICES COORDINATOR
wahdan@flightsafety.org (ext. 102)


PUBLICATIONS:

WAYNE ROSENKRANS, SENIOR EDITOR
rosenkrans@flightsafety.org (ext. 115)

MS LINDA WERFELMAN, SENIOR EDITOR
werfelman@flightsafety.org (ext. 122)

RICK DARBY, ASSOCIATE EDITOR
darby@flightsafety.org (ext. 113)

MS SUSAN D REED, PRODUCTION SPECIALIST
reed@flightsafety.org (ext. 123)

 
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