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Name: IRAN ASEMAN AIRLINES
7JetSet7 Code: IRC
Status: Operational
Region: MIDDLE EAST
City: TEHRAN
Country: IRAN
Employees 1900
Web: iaa.ir
Email: info@iaa.ir
Telephone: +98 2166002210
Fax: +98 2166025113
Sita: THRMDEP
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
IRC-2005-06-A
IRC-2008-08-ACCDT
IRC-LOGO

FORMED AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 1980. DOMESTIC, REGIONAL & INTERNATIONAL, SCHEDULED & CHARTER, PASSENGER & CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
PO BOX 13145-1476
MEHRAAD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
TEHRAN 13145-1476, IRAN

IRAN (ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAN) WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1502, IT COVERS AN AREA OF 1,648,000 SQ KM, ITS POPULATION IS 73 MILLION, ITS CAPITAL CITY IS TEHRAN, AND ITS OFFICIAL LANGUAGE IS FARSI.

JULY 1997: NEW ROUTE MASHHAD, TO DOHA. ROUTES TO QATAR, BAHRAIN AND BISHKEK (KIRGIZTAN).

1,100 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 400 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 700 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

DECEMBER 1997: 2 ORDERS ATR 72-210A'S (1998). 2 ORDERS A310'S, 260 PASSENGERS (PAX).

JANUARY 1998: 2 TU-154M'S RETURNED TO BASHKIRIAN AIRLINES.

APRIL 1998: 1,100 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 400 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 700 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

SEPTEMBER 1998: ATR 72-212A (573) ON ORDER.

OCTOBER 1998: SERVICE MASHHAD - DUSHANBE (TAJIKSTAN).

FEBRUARY 1999: 727-228 (EP-ASB) HAS "IRAN ASEMAN AIRLINES" ON FUSELAGE.

APRIL 1999: 1,100 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 400 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 700 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

SITA: THRIAY7.

APRIL 2000: HUB: SHIRAZ (INTERNATIONAL).

JULY 2000: 1999 = 271 MILLION (RPK) TRAFFIC; 55.8% LF LOAD FACTOR; 365,000 PASSENGERS (PAX).

DECEMBER 2000: ATR 42-320 (291, EP-ATR), SOLD BACK TO ATR. 1 ATR 72-212A (573, F-OIRB), ZAHRA LEASED.

APRIL 2001: MAIN BASE: TEHRAN (MEHRABAD) AIRPORT.

April 2002; SITA: THRIAY7.

May 2002: 2 ATR 72-202's (201, F-GKOA; 307, F-GKOC), Airlinair leased.

November 2002: The Government is considering merging Iran Air (IRN), Iran Air Tours (IRB), and Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC). Also, possibly, Aria Air, Caspian Airlines (CPN), Kish Air (IRK), Mahan Air (MHN), and Qeshm Air (QES), plus a number of regional operators.

ATR 72-212A (697, F-OIRA) delivery.

February 2003: 737-8CX (32361, TC-IEA), Inter (IAW) 1 month wet-leased. 10 F 100's (11519, EP-ASI), ex-Korean (KAL).

March 2003: ATR 72-202 (307, F-GKOC) returned to France Commuter lease.

April 2003: 1,241 employees (including 165 Flight Crew (FC), 183 Cabin Attendants (CA), & 704 Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

(abedzadeh@iaa.ir). SITA: THRIAEP.

July 2003: 2002 = 598 million (RPK) traffic (+.5%); 62.9% LF load factor; 740,000 passengers (PAX) (+.2%); 1.95 million (FTK) freight traffic.

2002 TOP WORLD AIRLINES TRAFFIC (RPK) (Million):
212 (SAS) COMMUTER) 854 Million; 213 (PORTUGALIA) 827; 214 (ADR) 794; 215 (PIE) 789; 216 (MIB) 771; 217 (IRB) 759; 218 (AUA) 749; 219 (ORC) 722; 220 (EXECUTIVE A/L) 718; 221 (AIR DOLOMOTI) 712; 222 (CITYJET) 694; 223 (TCV) 691; 224 (MNG) 686; 225 (UKA) 676.

September 2003: F 100 (11378) bought from Korean Air (KAL).

October 2003: F 100 (11388) bought from Korean Air (KAL). Plans to acquire 3 Dassault Falcon 50's.

January 2004: F 100 (11433, EP-ASM) delivery.

February 2004: F 100 (11454, EP-ASO) delivery.

June 2004: 2 F 100's (11504; EP-ASR; 11513, EPO-ASS), bought from Korean Air (KAL).

January 2005: F 100 (11523), bought from Korean Air (KAL).

March 2005: 1,100 employees.

SITA: THRMDEP.

June 2005: 2004 = 1.52 billion (RPK) (+30.2%) passenger traffic; +16.4% (ASK) capacity; 73.4% LF (+7.8) load factor.

1,265 employees (including 180 Flight Crew (FC); Cabin Attendants (CA); & 606 Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

September 2006: Iran Aseman Airlines (IRB) provides air taxi services and scheduled domestic and regional flights to the Gulf area. Charters are also undertaken.

1,298 employees (including 189 Flight Crew (FC); 201 Cabin Attendants & 497 Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

(IATA) Code: EP - 815. (ICAO) Code: IRC.

Parent organization/shareholders: Government owned (in process of privatization) (100%).

Main Base: Tehran Mehrabad Airport (THR):

Hubs: Dubai International (DXB); Mashad (MHD); Shiraz International (SYZ).

Domestic, Scheduled Destinations: Abadan; Ahwaz; Ardabil; Asaloyeh; Bam; Bandar Abbas; Birjand; Bojnord; Bushehr; Gheshm; Gorgan; Ilaam; Kermanshah; Khoy; Lamerd; Lar; Mashad; Now Shahr; Rafsanjan; Ramsar; Rasht; Sabzevar; Sahand; Sanandaj; Shiraz; Tabriz; Tehran; Yasouj; & Yazd.

International, Scheduled Destinations: Abu Dhabi; Bahrain; Bishkek; Doha; Dubai; Dushanbe; Kabul; & Kuwait.

August 2008: ACCDT: An Itek Air (IKA) 737-219 (676-22088, /80 EX-009) passenger plane from an airline banned in Europe over safety concerns crashed shortly after taking off from Kyrgyzstan's main airport, killing 65 of 6 Flight Crew ((FC)/Cabin attendants (CA)/83 passengers on board, officials said. It was en route from Bishkek to Tehran. About 10 minutes into the flight to Tehran, Iran, the crew of the 737 reported a technical problem and said the plane was returning to the airport, said an official at Manas International Airport, who spoke on condition of anonymity because she was not authorized to give her name. Government spokeswoman, Roza Daudova said 68 people on board the plane were killed and 22 survived. She said the known survivors included 7 out of 17 members of a high school basketball team from Bishkek.

Kyrgyz Interior Minister Maldomusa Kongatiyev told the Associated Press (AP)" the plane was carrying 83 passengers and 6 crew members when it went down 6 miles from the airport in the Central Asian country. Major Damian Pickart, Public Affairs Officer for the Manas American air base, which is at the airport, said the USA base sent ambulances and firefighting equipment in response to a Kyrgyz request for help. There were reports of thunderstorms in the area around the time of the accident. The airplane had passed a safety check in July. Ali Hazemi Longnedy, a survivor, told "Agence France Presse" that the pilot (FC) told passengers following takeoff, that the plane was experiencing engine problems. Kyrgyzstan officials said they had recovered the flight data recorder.

Emergency and government officials said the plane belonged to Itek Air (IKA), a Kyrgyz company, but was operated on wet-lease by Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC).

Itek Air (IKA) has been banned from operating in European Union (EU) airspace because of failure to meet safety and aviation standards, according to a list published by the (EU) last July 24.

At least 14 people rescued from the burning plane were hospitalized, 2 of them in critical condition, Yelena Bayalinova, a spokeswoman for the Kyrgyz Health Ministry, told (AP).

Emergency Situations Ministry spokesman, Ramis Satybekov said the crash was likely caused by either an engine failure or a malfunction in the plane's flight control system. Daudova, however, said the cause of the crash was decompression of the jet.

Kyrgyzstan is a poor, mountainous country west of China. The (USAF) air base in the ex-Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan supports operations in nearby Afghanistan. The USA has 2 bases in Central Asia: the 1 in Bishkek and the other in Uzbekistan, which are leased to support the USA military operation against the Taliban in Afghanistan.

SEE ATTACHED ARTICLE & PHOTOS - - "IRC-2008-08-ACCDT."

November 2010: Fokker F 100 (11323, EP-ATE), delivery.

January 2011: Fokker F 100 (11329, EP-ATG), ex-(F-GPXK) delivery.

February 2012: Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC) has managed to acquire an A340-311 (002, EP-APA - - SEE PHOTO - - "IRC-A340-300 - 2012-02"), ex-(M-YRGU) indirectly from USA lessor (GMT) Global Republic Aviation. It has not been disclosed how the acquisition of the 1st A340 airplane (002) was financed. The (CFM) International (CFM56)-powered airplane was built in 1992.

It is understood that after it transpired that the 1st A340 had been sold on to Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC), Falko blocked the deal involving the 2nd A340-300 (003).

The European Union (EU) and the USA have imposed strict sanctions on Iran owing to controversies surrounding the Iranian nuclear program. While (EU) sanctions restrict foreign trade to Iran, the USA has implemented an economic embargo on Iran, including a ban on selling airplanes or repair parts to Iranian aviation companies.

This 2nd A340, also built in 1992, is now "parked with (GMT)", after a subsequent deal for Portuguese charter carrier Luzair to acquire the airplane later fell through, a source said.

April 2013: Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC) plans to lauch its 1st European service on May 2nd, from Tehran to Stockholm Arlanda with its A340.

September 2013: Mashhad International Airport (MHD), also known as Shahid Hashemi Nejad Airport, serves Iran’s 2nd most populous city, Mashhad (2.77 million in the 2011 population census). The capital of the Razavi Khorasan Province is located in the north-east of Iran, close to the Afghanistan and Turkmenistan borders. The city was originally a small village called Sanabad and it later became known as Mashhad (which translates as “place of martyrdom”) following the burial of Imam Reza (Ali Al-Ridha), the 7th descendant of the Islamic prophet Muhammad and the eighth of the Twelve Imams. Today, the Imam Reza shrine in Mashhad occupies a total area of 598,657 square metres, making it the largest mosque in the world by area, ahead of Muscat’s Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque and Mecca’s Masjid al-Haram.

Despite a -12.9% decline in passenger traffic in 2011, it is clear that Mashhad has followed an overall growth trend since 2008. Noticeably, the airport experienced the highest growth in annual passengers (37.2%) between 2011 and 2012. Mashhad has posted traffic figures for the 1st half of 2013 of 2.03 million passengers. If Mashhad performs equally well in the 2nd half of 2013, then the airport is on track to pass the 4 million passenger mark, with annual passengers predicted to total around 4.06 million.

As expected, 3 of Iran’s leading airlines control the top positions at Mashhad for both scheduled weekly frequencies and capacities. Overall, weekly flights are up at Mashhad by 5.9%. Combined, Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC), Iran Airtour Airline and Iran Air (IRN) control 87.5% of weekly flights and 86.1% of weekly seats at Mashhad. Iran Aseman (IRC) leads the weekly flights table, although the carrier is the only airline which has seen a decline, with 2x-weekly flights less compared with the same week last year. Iran Aseman (IRC)’s flights share is down (-3.4%) on the same period last year. However, it is still ahead of the 2nd place carrier, Iran Airtour, by 12.9%.

Given the religious significance of Mashhad to Shia Muslims, the airport also attracts a significant volume of commercial charter flights, most notably from Iranian carrier Mahan Air (MHN). If these charter services were included in the airline rankings, then Mahan Air (MHN) would be the #1 operator in terms of passenger volumes at the airport.

Ranking 3rd for both flights and capacity, the Iranian flag carrier, Iran Air (IRN), recorded the biggest growth in weekly flights over the past 12 months (+4.1%), an additional 11x-weekly flights. Iran Air (IRN) has increased weekly frequencies to Tehran (18x- to 20x-weekly) and doubled services to Yazd (now 2x-weekly). In addition, Iran Air (IRN) which is the #2 carrier in Iran in terms of weekly flights, has added new domestic routes to; Ahwaz, Isfahan, Rasht, Tabriz (2x-weekly) and Ardabil (weekly). (IRN), which defines Mashhad as one if its focus cities, has reduced frequency to Birjand by a 3rd (now 2x-weekly).

Overall capacity at Mashhad is up +6.7% on the same period last year. In the last year, Mashhad has maintained the same number of airlines (12). Nevertheless, Iraqi Airways (IRQ) and Air Arabia (ABZ) have been added to the list, introducing services to Al Najaf in Iraq and Sharjah in the (UAE); while Gulf Air (GUL)and Avia Traffic Company (ATF) have pulled out of Mashhad, dropping Bahrain and Bishkek respectively, the only services offered by each carrier.

Iran Airtour holds the largest capacity share at Mashhad (0.3% greater than Iran Aseman (IRC)). The subsidiary of the Iranian flag carrier has taken Iran Aseman (IRC)’s leading capacity spot in 2013, with the highest share of weekly seats. Iran Airtour has, however, maintained the exact number of weekly seats as the same week last year, only moving into 1st place because Iran Aseman (IRC) offers -1,494 less weekly seats than in the same week last year. The biggest capacity growth at Mashhad was seen by Iran Air (IRN), which offers +64.1% more weekly seats in 2013 than last year. Even with such significant growth, Iran Air (IRN) remains in 3rd place and has increased its weekly capacity share at Mashhad by +8.2%.

Mashhad serves 11 other countries, with domestic services accounting for 58.3% of the 39 destinations served worldwide (82.9% weekly seat share). When comparing weekly seats data for September 17 - 23, 2013, with the same week last year, Mashhad has maintained its top 3 destinations, Tehran, Isfahan, and Shiraz, albeit slightly reshuffled. Tehran, the Iranian capital city (excluded from the chart below) has held onto the #1 spot with 12,141 weekly seats, -439 fewer than the same week last year, reducing its weekly seat share to 37.5% (-3.9%). Isfahan, in 2nd place and Shiraz in 3rd, have both swapped positions in the weekly seats rankings compared with the same week in 2012. The 2 domestic destinations witnessed weekly seat share changes of +0.4% and -2.1%, respectively.

Within the top 12, there are just 3 international destinations; Dammam, Doha, and Istanbul. These international routes are the only destinations offered in Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey. Bushehr in Iran and Kuwait City have slipped out of the top 12, compared with last year, moving into 13th and 14th, allowing Kish Island and Tabriz (two new domestic destinations) to move into the chart.

Outside of the domestic market, which makes up the majority share of destinations, Doha in Qatar comes first with a 3.3% share of weekly seats, closely followed by Turkey (3.1%). Lebanon, Pakistan, Bahrain, Iraq, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan combined account for 2.9% of weekly seats, each with a 1% or less share. Iran can be proud of its aviation industry as Mashhad looks set to continue growing in the future.

October 2014: Iran Aseman Airlines ((IATA) Code: EP, based at Tehran Mehrabad) (IRC) has taken over 2 A320-231s, EP-APF (354, EP-APF) and (414, EP-APE), formerly with Mahan Air ((IATA) Code: W5, based at Tehran Mehrabad) (MHN). As it stands, the A320s are Iran Aseman (IRC)'s 2nd Airbus Industrie (EDS) type after its sole A340-300 (2, EP-APA), which was recently returned to service following maintenance at Tehran Mehrabad.

Iran Aseman (IRC) also operates 6 ATR 72s, 3 727-200s, 1 727-200F, and 17 Fokker F 100s.

Iran Aseman (IRC) currently operates 30 airplanes, and serves 10 countries, to 52 destinations, on 93 routes and 108 daily flights.

November 2014: A320-231 (354, EP-APF), ex-(EP-MML), Khors Air (KHO) leased.

August 2015: Iran Aseman (IRC) is set for its first McDonnell Douglas twinjet.

February 2016: ATR is in negotiations with Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC), which is looking to renew its fleet of 6 ATRs now sanctions on the country have been lifted.

October 2016: The Iraqi Ministry of Transport signed a cooperation agreement with long term partner Lufthansa Consulting (DLH) (LHS) wherein the German firm will advise it on the restructuring of Iraqi Airways (IRQ) and the state-owned enterprise (SOE) which manages the country's airports.

The announcement comes on the back of a series of statements made by high-ranking Iraqi officials, the most prominent of which pointed to the establishment of a new carrier dedicated exclusively to the Iraq - Europe market. It is recalled that in December last year, the European Commission (EC) blacklisted Iraqi Airways (IRQ) for alleged failures in its safety oversight protocols. While it has since been able to resume service to the bloc, (IRQ) has only been able to do so using foreign (owned and/or maintained) airplane metal.

In all, Baghdad's decision to try reclaim lost market share is hardly surprising given that approximately 75% of Iraq's lucrative European connectivity is handled by foreign airlines. And it is even more surprising when you consider Iraq's tenuous national security situation and the large swathes of its north that are still under de-facto (IS) control as a result.

Though it doesn't suffer from the extremist insurgency that its neighbor is currently going through, Iran is also attempting to win back its share of European market. Following the signing of a nuclear deal with the "P5+1" (China, France, Russia, the UK, and the USA; plus Germany) in January, Iran has been gradually brought in from the cold. The reopening of the Iranian economy to limited foreign investments has seen a flurry of international carriers returning to Tehran for the 1st time in years. So far, British Airways (BAB) and (KLM) have made their Tehran service plans widely known but not much has been said about Iranian carriers despite the glitz and glamor around the tentative Airbus (EDS) and Boeing (TBC) (and possibly (ATR), Bombardier (BMB), Embraer (EMB), and Mitsubishi) (MRJ) mega-orders, said to include A350s and 787s.

That changed just recently when the "Fars" news wire ran a story about the relatively unknown Qeshm Air (QES) securing its Third Country Operator (TCO) license from the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) earlier this month. The license is a mandatory requirement for any airline wishing to serve Europe, and assesses a prospective carrier's overall safety and quality of operations. These 2 areas have proven problematic for Iran's airlines in recent years given the ageing fleets most operate using spares, and aircraft, that are often clandestinely acquired.

Anyway (EASA) has since confirmed that indeed, Qeshm Air (QES), Mahan Air (MHN), and Iran Air (IRN) have (TCO)s although (MHN) is restricted from using its A310 fleet to Europe. Iran Air Tours (IRB) is still undergoing scrutinization while Meraj Air and (ATA) Airlines (Iran) have both withdrawn their respective bids. Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC)' application was rejected, (EASA) said.

For its part, Qeshm Air (QES), which until now, has focused on the domestic and regional Iranian markets, has yet to set a date for its maiden European flights.

ch-aviation.com

March 2017: Boeing (TBC) has confirmed Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC) signed a memorandum of agreement (MOA) for 30 737 MAX airplanes, with a list price value of $3 billion. The deal includes purchase rights for +30 additional 737 MAXs. Deliveries are scheduled to start in 2022. (TBC) said it negotiated the (MOA) under authorizations from the USA government following a determination that Iran had met its obligations under the nuclear accord signed in 2015. Boeing said it will look to the Office of Foreign Assets Control for approval to perform under this transaction.

“Boeing continues to follow the lead of the USA government with regards to working with Iran’s airlines, and any and all contracts with Iran’s airlines are contingent upon USA government approval.”

In December 2016, Boeing (TBC) announced it had firmed an (MOA) with Iran Air (IRN) earlier that year for 50 narrow body and 30 wide body airplanes in a deal valued at $16.6 billion at list prices. The contract covered 50 737 MAX 8s, 15 777-300ERs and 15 777-9Xs.

In January this year, Iran Air (IRN) took delivery of its 1st Airbus A321, which was part of historic order for 100 Airbus aircraft (46 A320-family single-aisle models, plus 54 twin-aisles consisting of a mix of A330s and A350s) signed in 2016. In March, (IRN) the Iranian flag carrier received its 1st wide body A330-200 from that order.

May 2017: The European Commission (EC) has added 4 airlines to the European Union (EU) Air Safety List, including Air Zimbabwe (ZMB), but at the same time lifted an earlier ban on all carriers from Benin and Mozambique.

In the May 16 update, all airlines certified in Benin and Mozambique were cleared from the list, following safety oversight improvements.
“Their reforms have paid off. This is also a signal to the 16 countries that remain on the list. It shows that work and cooperation pays off. The Commission and the European Aviation Safety Agency [EASA] are ready to assist them and raise the safety standards worldwide,” European transport commissioner Violeta Bulc said.

Air Zimbabwe (ZMB) was the highest profile of the 4 newly banned carriers, sitting alongside Nigeria’s Medview Airline, Mustique Airways from St Vincent and the Grenadines and Ukrainian carrier Air Urga.

The (EC) said the 4 failed to address safety deficiencies picked up during an (EASA) 3rd-country operator audit.

Banned airlines on the (EU) Air Safety List cannot operate to, from or within the (EU), but many of the 181 blacklisted carriers do not have European operations.

The (EU) sometimes bans every airline from a country because of poor regulatory oversight; this applies to the vast majority of banned airlines (174 airlines in 16 states) even though the airline itself may have a safe operation.

The remaining 7 airlines are blacklisted because specific safety concerns with their operation. Alongside the 4 new additions, these comprise Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC), Iraqi Airways (IRQ) and Suriname carrier Blue Wing Airlines.

Finally, 6 airlines are subject to operational restrictions and can only fly to the (EU) with specific aircraft types: Gabonese carriers Afrijet and Nouvelle Air Affaires SN2AG, Korean carrier Air Koryo, Air Service Comores from the Comoros, Iran Air (IRN) and (TAAG) Angola Airlines.

June 2017: Boeing (TBC) has finalized a $3 billion definitive agreement with Iran Aseman Airlines (IRC) for the purchase of up to 60 737 MAX commercial passenger airplanes.

See photo: "IRN-2017-06 - 737 MAX Order.jpg."

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
IRC-727-228
IRC-737 MAX - 2017-08.jpg
IRC-737-8CX
IRC-A340-300 - 2012-02
IRC-A340-311 - 2013-10
IRC-F-100
IRC-F-100 - 2014-10
IRC-F100 1

June 2017:

3 727-228 (JT8D-15) (1594-22081, /80 EP-ASA; 603-22082, /80 EP-ASB; 638-22084, /80 EP-ASC; 665-22085, /80 EP-ASD). 172Y.

1 727-200F (JT8D-15) FREIGHTER.

0 737-219 (JT8D-15) (676-22088, /80 EX-009), EX-(COP) 2006-04. (IKA) WET-LSD 2008-07. W/O - - DESTROYED IN CRASH AT BISHKEK, AUGUST 2008. 8C, 106Y.

0 737-8CX (CFM56-7B) (1098-32361, TC-IEA), (IAW) WET-LSD 2003-02, RTND 2003-03.

30/30 ORDERS (2022-02) BOEING 737 MAX:

1 ORDER (2015-09) MD-80:

2 ORDERS A310, 260 PAX.

1 A320-200 (480, EP-APG), EX-(YA-KMA), EX-KAM-AIR 2015-06.

2 A320-231 (354, EP-APF, 414, EP-APE), EX-(MHN) 2014-10. 354 KHORS AIR (KHO) LSD 2014-11.

1 A340-311 (CFM56) (002, /92 EP-APA - - SEE PHOTO - - "IRC-A340-300 - 2012-02"), GMT GLOBAL REPUBLIC AVIATION LSD 2012-02.

2 F28-1000 (SPEY 555-15) (11102, /76 EP-PAX; 11104, /76 EP-PAZ), 65Y, VIP (GOVT OPS).

3 F28-4000 (SPEY 555-15H) (11144, /79 EP-ASE; 11164, /81 EP-PAT; 11166, /81 EP-PAU; 11135, /79 EP-PBJ), 80Y.

17 F 100 (TAY 650-15) (11329, EP-ATG, 2011-01; 11438, /93 EP-ASG; 11439, /93 EP-ASH; 11378, /03 EP-ASI; 11388, /03 EP-ASJ; 11432, /03 EP-ASL; 11519, /03 EP-ASI), EX-(KAL). 109Y.

4 DO-228-212 (TPE331-5A-252D) (8195, /92 EP-TCC; 8207, /92 EP-THA; 8308, /92 EP-TZA), PHOTO/SURVEY FOR NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CENTER.

1 ATR 42-300.

0 ATR 72-202 (PW124B) (201, /91 F-GKOA; 307, /92 F-GKOC), AIRLINAIR LSD 2002-05. 307 RTND 2003-03. 201 RTND ATR 2004-06. 64Y.

4 ATR 72-212 (PW127) (334, /93 EP-ATA; 339, /93 EP-ATH; 391, /93 EP-ATS; 398, /93 EP-ATZ). 64Y.

2 ATR 72-212A (PW127F) (573, /99 F-OIRB; 697, /02 F-OIRA), 64Y.

20 ORDERS AN-140.

8 F 100 (TAY 650-15) (11378, 2003-09; 11388, 2003-10; 11421, EP-ASZ; 11431, EP-ASX; 11438, 2003-04; 11439, 2003-04; 11454, EP-ASO; 11504, EP-ASR, 2004-06; 11513, EP-ASQ, 2004-06; 11522, EP-ASR, 2004-10; 11523, 2005-01), EX-(KAL). 109Y.

4 F 100 (TAY 650-15) (11323, EP-ATE, 2010-11; 11329, /91 EP-ATG, 2011-01; 11433, EP-ASM, 2004-01; 11454, EP-ASO, 2004-02), EX-EU JET (EUJ) 2005. 109Y.

0 TU-154M, 2 ST BASHKIRIAN AIRLINES.

6 DASSAULT FALCON 20E (CF700-2D2) (286, /73 EP-AGY). EXEC.

1 DASSAULT FALCON 20F (CF700-2D2) (367, /77 EP-SEA), 10Y.

1 YAK-40.

Management:
(definitions)

ALI ABEDZADEH, MANAGING DIRECTOR (abedzadeh@iaa.ir).

IRAJ RONAGHI, SENIOR DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR.

MOHAMMAD MEHDI GHADERI, DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR OPERATIONS.

MOHAMMAD GORJI, DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR TECHNICAL.

JAVAD ROSTAMI, DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR COMMERCIAL.

IRAJ RONAGHI, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR.

 
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