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Airlines

Name: KARTIKA AIRLINES
7JetSet7 Code: KTK
Status: Currently Not Operational
Region: ORIENT
City: JAKARTA
Country: INDONESIA
Employees 17
Web: kartikaairlines.com
Email: kartikaairlines@mail.com
Telephone: +62-21-345 2947
Fax: +62-21-344-9535
Sita:
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
KTK-DEC04-A
KTK-DEC04-B
KTK-DEC04-C
KTK-NEWSJUN04

FORMED AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 2001. DOMESTIC, REGIONAL & INTERNATIONAL, SCHEDULED, CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
JL. MEDAN MERDEKA TMR 7
JAKARTA 10110, INDONESIA

Indonesia (the Republic of Indonesia) was established in 1945, it covers an area of 1,904,569 sq km, its population is 210 million, its capital city is Jakarta, and its official language is Indonesian.

DECEMBER 2001: TO SURABAYA, UJUNG PEDANG, AND MANADO.

2 737-200'S, TRANSMILE (TML) LEASED. 5 ORDERS F28'S EX-MERPATI (PNM).

FEBRUARY 2002: TO SURABAYA - MAKASSAR - AMBON AND TO SURABAYA - MAKASSAR - TIMIKA/BIAK/JAYAPURA.

APRIL 2002: (http://www.kartikaairlines.com).

September 2002: 737-209 (24197), returned to Transmile (TML), leased to Seulawah Nad Air (SND).

February 2003: 737-2B7 (23134, /84 PK-KAT "BLESSING"), JETR leased.

April 2004: Suspended operations.

May 2005: Kartika Airlines (KTK) is an Indonesian airline operating domestic jet airplane flights from Jakarta.

Parent organization/shareholders: PT Truba (100%).

(ICAO) Code: KAE.

July 2005: 737-284 (22338, PK-KAD), delivery.

August 2005: 737-284 (22339, PK-KAo), delivery.

April 2007: The USA (FAA) announced that Indonesia "does not comply with international safety standards set by (ICAO)" and lowered the country's safety rating to Category 2, ruling that it is "no longer overseeing the safety of its airlines in accordance with international standards." The USA State Dept issued its own statement saying that last month's safety assessment conducted by the Indonesian Directorate General of Civil Aviation did not include "detailed methodology supporting the ratings" and that "Americans traveling to and from Indonesia should fly directly to their destinations on international carriers from countries whose civil aviation authorities meet international aviation safety standards."

July 2007: Indonesia and (ICAO) signed a "groundbreaking declaration" in Bali under which Indonesia committed to wide-ranging initiatives to improve the safety of its civil aviation system. The deal comes after the European Union (EU) banned all Indonesian airlines from flying into its airspace. Indonesia will restructure the Directorate General of Civil Aviation, enact the required legal framework for it effectively to meet international safety obligations, ensure the required human and financial resources and correct deficiencies identified by (ICAO)'s Universal Safety Oversight Audit Program and other internal or external audits. (ICAO) said, "Indonesia will also implement a proactive and systemic management of safety to comply, in a verifiable manner, with national requirements and (ICAO) international safety standards and industry best practices. This includes a commitment by government authorities and the local air transport industry to foster transparency and the sharing of safety-related data to support the safety management process, under guidelines established by (ICAO)."

November 2007: The European Commission (EC) issued the sixth update of its airline blacklist, removing Suriname's Blue Wing Airlines and lifting the operating restrictions imposed on Pakistan International Airlines (PIA). Both carriers, however, will remain subject to prioritized ramp inspections at Community airports in order to ensure their "consistent adherence" to relevant safety standards. "This latest revision shows that when airlines take rapid and sound corrective action to comply with safety standards, they can be withdrawn from the list quickly," (EC) VP Transport, Jacques Barrot noted. "It also shows that the list increasingly serves as a preemptive, rather than punitive tool for safeguarding aviation safety." He added that relevant oversight authorities verified measures taken by (PIA) and Blue Wing Airlines and "that these measures provide for long-lasting sustainable solutions to avoid the same problems recurring in the future."

The blacklist now comprises eight individual carriers including TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG), Mahan Air (MHN), and Ukrainian Mediterranean Airlines (UM Air - (UKM)), whose operations are fully banned in the (EU). Also banned are all airlines from Equatorial Guinea (ECV), Indonesia: (AWR); (BLN); (BTV); (DHI); (FES); (GIA); (KTK); (LKW); (MLI); (MND); (NOK); (PNM); (PTF); (REX); (SJA); (TGN); (TMG); (WON); (XPR); Kyrgyzstan: (ITL); (KYR); (PHG); (PHX); (STZ); Liberia: (LBG); Sierra Leone: (ORG); (RUM); (UVL); Swaziland: (AFC); and Democratic Republic of Congo: (TCS); (WDA); & (WET) with the exception of Hewa Bora Airways (EXD), which is subject to operating restrictions). Operational restrictions were placed on Air Bangladesh (BGD) and Air Service Comores (COM).

July 2008: The eighth edition of the European Commission (EC)'s blacklist of banned airlines does not include Iran's Mahan Airlines (MHN), thanks to "significant efforts and progress accomplished by this carrier, which were verified during an on-site inspection," but continues to include Indonesian airlines, including Garuda Indonesia (GIA). "The Commission (EC) decided that the Indonesian authorities have still not developed and implemented an efficient oversight program on any of the carriers under their regulatory control," it said. Ukraine Cargo Airways remains banned as well, and Yemenia Airways (YEM) was told it "should complete its corrective actions plan" by the Air Safety Committee's next meeting. All airlines from Equatorial Guinea, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are banned, while Gabon Airlines and Afrijet (FRJ) from Gabon are allowed to maintain operations at their current level.

August 2008: Indonesia's economy grew +6% (year/year) in the second quarter (Q2).

November 2008: The European Commission (EC) added some other airlines to its list of airlines banned from flying into the European Union (EU). Regarding the Philippines, the (EC) said it "intends to carry out with member states a safety assessment of the Philippine civil aviation authorities in early 2009."

December 2008: Kartika Airlines (KTK) signed a deal with Sukhoi Civil Aircraft for 15 firm Superjet 100s worth $448 million, plus 15 options, according to press reports from Moscow. Deliveries of the 95-seat airplanes are scheduled to begin in 2011.

April 2009: Indonesia's Ministry of Transportation said all airlines based in the country will be required to operate at least 10 airplanes (each) by 2012, at least five of which must be owned. "If not, they will have to shut down or merge with other airlines to meet the quota," a ministry spokesperson told reporters. The rule change (currently Indonesian carriers only have to own two airplanes) is driven by safety concerns. "We want airlines to be financially sound and committed to giving the best in terms of service and safety," the spokesperson said, according to "Agence France Presse."

July 2009: Iran's Mahan Air (MHN) was added to the (EU)'s list of banned airlines, while Garuda Indonesia (GIA), Airfast Indonesia (PTF), Mandala Airlines (MND) and Premiair were removed from the "blacklist." The latest update did not include Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM), despite recent controversy following the June 29 A310-300 crash that killed 152 passengers and crew. All airlines from Zambia and Kazakhstan were added to the list with the exception of Air Astana (AKZ), which will be allowed limited access to (EU) nations.

TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG), already on the list of more than >200 carriers, will be allowed to operate "into Portugal only with certain airplanes and under very strict conditions," the European Commission (EC) said, adding that the limited access was granted to acknowledge "progress made by the civil aviation authority of Angola [and TAAG (ANG)] to resolve progressively any safety deficiencies." All other Angolan airlines remain banned. All Indonesian carriers remain banned apart from the aforementioned four. Complete bans are in place on airlines from Benin, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Swaziland.

European Commission VP Transport, Antonio Tajani has called for a global blacklist, a suggestion that has been rejected by (ICAO) for now. "We will not accept that airlines fly at different standards when they operate inside and outside Europe," he said, renewing his call. "It is high time that the international community rethinks its safety policy; those airlines which are unsafe should not be allowed to fly anywhere."

July 2010: Sukhoi Civil Aircraft Company and Kartika Airlines (KTK) finalized an order for 30 SSJ100/95B airplanes. The deal is valued at $951 million at current list prices. Deliveries are planned for 2012 to 2015. Both parties announced an initial agreement in Jakarta in December 2008 for 15 airplanes and 15 options. “Sukhoi Superjet 100 is a perfect tool to bridge the market gap on regional capacity as major Indonesian carriers are focused on large single-aisle airplanes. With this new right-sized airplane, we can develop and serve more point-to-point destinations with obvious operational efficiency and unsurpassed comfort for passengers,” Kartika (KTK) CEO, Kim Johanes Mulia Jiauw commented.

January 2011: Kartika Airlines (KTK) and Riau Airlines are looking to attract new equity investors, so the businesses can be recapitalized and expanded to meet new government regulations.
(KTK) has only two airplanes, both 737-200s leased from Aero Nusantara Indonesia (ANI), and industry executives say (KTK)’s owners have been speaking to potential buyers. A (KTK) sale could have implications for the Sukhoi SuperJet 100 because (KTK) is the airplane’s Asian launch customer with a firm order for 30. Deliveries to (KTK) are due to start in mid-2012. Riau Airlines currently flies one airplane, a 737-500 leased from (ANI). Some of the Indonesian local governments that are shareholders in the unprofitable carrier have been trying to withdraw, although the Riau provincial government is still backing it and is trying to bring in new investors, say industry executives. But it is unclear whether this provincial government and any new investors will be willing to inject enough money for Riau Airlines to have a fleet of 10 airplanes by January 2012. The carrier is involved in a legal dispute with USA airplane leasing company AeroCentury, which took back its two Fokker F 50s after the airline experienced financial problems. Riau Airlines also has three Fokker 50s that it bought, but these are parked at Jakarta Perdanakusuma Airport and are in need of repair because they were cannibalized for parts, says an industry executive familiar with the situation. Riau Airlines’ website shows it is serving Pekanbaru, Natuna, Batam, and Tanjung Pinang in Indonesia, as well as Malacca, Malaysia, using the 737-500. Riau Airlines and Kartika (KTK) need to add airplanes quickly to meet a new government rule that goes into effect in January 2012 and requires all commercial airlines in Indonesia to have a minimum of 10 airplanes, of which five must be owned. This new rule will lead to market consolidation. Mandala Airlines (MND) already has shuttered its entire operations with effect from January 13. The South Jakarta Commercial Court granted Mandala (mnd) a 45-day temporary reprieve on January 17 to enable it to formulate a restructuring plan. The owners are now trying to bring in new investors to recapitalize the business. Prior to the shutdown, Mandala (MND) had five airplanes: two leased A319s from International Lease Finance Corp (ilfc), two A320s leased from Amentum Capital and one A320 leased from AerCap (DEA), according to Ascend Online Fleets data.

July 2012: Kartika Airlines (KTK) has told the "Jakarta Post" that it still plans to take delivery of its 30 SSJ100-95s on order and expects to resume operations in the fall. (KTK) has not operated any flights since 2010 and had previously announced plans to restart several times. It now states it plans to resume scheduled operations with the first SSJ100-95s towards the end of the year operating from Jayapura Sentani (DJJ) to Merauke Mopah (MKQ) and Tembagapura Timika Moses Kilangin (TIM) as well as between Ambon Pattimura (AMQ) and Sorong Jefman (SOQ) airports.



Note: Kartika Airlines (KTK) is listed on the latest (EU) blacklist released 03.04.2012 of airlines whose operations are subject to a ban within the (EU)*. *Airlines listed in Annex A could be permitted to exercise traffic rights by using wet-leased airplanes of an air carrier which is not subject to an operating ban, provided that the relevant safety standards are complied with.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
KTK

April 2014:

0 737-2B7 (JT8D-15A HK) (1050-23134, /84 PK-KAT "BLESSING"), JETR LSD 2003-02. RTND, LST (XPR) 2005-02. 123Y.

1 737-209 (JT8D-9A) (1420-23796, /87 PK-KAR; 1581-24197, PK-KAS), (TML) LSD 2001-12 . 24197 RTT (TML) 2002-09, LST (SND). 123Y.

2 737-284 (JT8D) (22338, PK-KAD, 2005-07; 22339, PK-KAO, 2005-08).

5 ORDERS F28, EX-(PNM).

30 ORDERS (2011) SUKHOI SUPERJET 100, 98Y OR 8C, 78Y.

Management:
(definitions)

MR HASAN M, PRESIDENT DIRECTOR.

KIM JOHANES MULIA JIAUW, CHAIRMAN & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO).

EKO GUNARTO, FLIGHT OPERATIONS MANAGER.

MR GUHARSA, TECHNICAL MANAGER.

MR SUGRIAT, QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) MANAGER.

 
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