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Name: KYRGYZ PEGASUS AIRLINES
7JetSet7 Code: KYR
Status: Operational
Region: CIS
City: BISHKEK
Country: KYRGYZSTAN
Employees 4170
Web: kyrgyzair.com
Email: kag@ka.kg
Telephone: +996 312 548 054
Fax: +996 312 548 066
Sita:
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
KYR-2004-11
KYR-2006-09-ACCDT
KYR-2009-12 NEW OPS
KYR-MAP - 2013-09
KYR-MAP-A

ESTABLISHED IN 1992. A K A KYRGYZSTAN INTERNATIONAL AIRLINES. FORMER AEROFLOT (ARO) DIVISION. DOMESTIC, REGIONAL & INTERNATIONAL, SCHEDULED AND CHARTER, PASSENGER & CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
MIR AVENUE 95
BISHKEK 720026, KYRGYZSTAN

ADDRESS:
CHUI AVN 48
720011 BISHKEK, KYRGYZSTAN

KYRGYSTAN (REPUBLIC OF KYRGYZSTAN) WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1991, IT COVERS AN AREA OF 198,500 SQ KM, ITS POPULATION IS 5 MILLION, ITS CAPITAL CITY IS BISHKEK, AND ITS OFFICIAL LANGUAGE IS KYRGHIZ.

MAY 1997: TO ALMATY, BAKU, EKATERINBURG, KALINGRAD, KARAKOL, KRASNOYARSK, MOSCOW, NOVOSIBIRSK, OMSK, SAMARA, ST PETERSBURG, TASHKENT & UFA.

BASED AT THE MANAS AIRPORT, BISHKEK, KYRGYZSTAN REPUBLIC.

AIRBUS (EDS) IS TRYING TO PLACE A319'S ON LEASE TO COMPETE WITH INTEREST IN 737-700'S.

4,170 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 607 FLIGHT CREW (FC).

OCTOBER 1997: TO PURCHASE 1 IL-76T FREIGHTER, & 1 TU-154M, USING GOVT GUARANTEED CREDIT, FROM RUSSIA.

DECEMBER 1997: 2 ORDERS (2002) A319'S & 1 ORDER (1998) A320, LEASED.

MARCH 1998: 1ST A320, LEASED, EX-TRANSASIA (FSH), (DLH) "C" MAINTENANCE CHECK.

APRIL 1998: 4,170 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 607 FLIGHT CREW (FC)).

1 A320-231 (478), DEBIS LEASED, EX-TRANSASIA (FSH).

APRIL 1999: 4,170 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 607 FLIGHT CREW (FC)).

NOVEMBER 1999: TU-134A-3 (60346, EX-65111), RETIRED.

DECEMBER 1999: A320 (V2500) (478) RETURNED TO LESSOR, LEASED TO (SHO).

APRIL 2000: 4,170 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 607 FLIGHT CREW (FC)).

JULY 2000: LAST QUARTER = 266 MILLION (RPK) TRAFFIC; 78.5% LF LOAD FACTOR; 3.08 MILLION (FTK) FREIGHT TRAFFIC; 156,000 PASSENGERS (PAX).

OCTOBER 2000: "EASTLINK LANKER," LONDON, UK TAKES 77% STAKE IN (KYR), AND TAKES OVER MANAGEMENT OF AIRLINE. GOVERNMENT'S STATE PROPERTY FUND WILL RETAIN ITS SHARES IN THE AIRLINE, BUT GIVES UP ITS VOTING RIGHTS. EASTLINK WILL ALSO TAKE SOME INTERESTS IN THE COUNTRY'S AIRPORTS.

JANUARY 2002: 1 YAK 40 (9420235, EX-87426) LEASED TO AEROVISTA.

April 2002: Main Base: Manas Bishkek airport (FRU).

Alliances: Aeroflot (ARO).

International, Scheduled Service: Delhi.

August 2002: Joint venture between investors from Malaysia (Safuan Group) and Kyrgyzstan take over the airline. Matshah Safuan, is Chairman of Malyasia's Safuan Group, who are a conglomerate, which owns hotels, controls the airline, and hopes to add more Asian destinations, plus European services in 2003. Current services are intended to offer Muslim pilgrims, an affordable way to make Umrah pilgrimages, to the holy cities of Mecca, and Medina, in Saudi Arabia.

To Jakarta, via Kuala Lumpur (3/week). To Jeddah (2/week).

1 A300B4-605R (749, TC-OAB), Onur Air (ONU) wet-leased.

September 2002: Suspends operations.

October 2002: A300B4-605R (749, TC-OAB) returned to (ONU).

January 2003: 1/1 orders (2/03) 757-200 (1990), (ILF) leased. (KYR)'s UK sales agent, Payless Travel, is reportedly funding the acquisition. To operate to Delhi and Amritsar, as well as Birmingham, UK.

July 2003: Delhi - Bishkek - London Gatwick (767-300ER, Air Holland (HOL) wet-leased, 2/week).

1 MD-80 (1070-49119, 3D-ABV), ex-US Airways (USA). Yak-40 (9310726, EX-87250), wet-leased to Air Libya Tibesti.

October 2003: IL-76TD (0063466989, UR-CAP), delivery.

August 2004: 757-2Q8 (26270), Boeing Capital (TBC) leased.

September 2004: 4,170 employees.

(http://www.kyrgyzstanairlines.kg). (office@kyrgyzstanairlines.kg).

September 2006: Kyrgyz Air (KYR) as the national carrier operates scheduled, domestic and international services and charter jet airplane flights.

(IATA) Code: R8 - 758. (ICAO) Code: KGA (Callsign - KYRGYZ).

Parent organization/shareholders: Government (81%); private shareholders (11%); & Soial Foundation (8%).

Main Base: Bishkek Manas International Airport (FRU).

Domestic, scheduled destinations: Bishkek, & Osh.

International, scheduled destinations: Delhi; Dushanbe; Frankfurt; Hanover; Jalalabad; Karachi; London; Moscow; Novosibirsk; Omsk; Sharjah; Tashkent; & Urumqi.

ACCDT: On the night of September 26, a Kyrgyz Air (KYR) Tu-154 with 6 (FC) - (CA)/52 passengers on board, taking off from Manas Airport in Bishkek, Kyrgyztan, had its right wing pass under a (USF) KC-135 with 3 on board, holding by the side of the runway, but clipped the KC-135 number one engine (left outboard engine) destroying it and a portion of the wing in the fiery aftermath. Despite losing about 2 m/6 ft of its right outboard wing in the collision, the Tu-154 was able to continue its takeoff and was able to return to the airport for a successful emergency landing. The accident resulted in in heavy damage to both airplanes, but no fatalities. The USA military Accident Investigation Board (AIB) stated the "principal" cause of the mishap was the Kyrgyz airport's Air Traffic Controller (ATC) clearing the Tu-154 for takeoff, before making sure that the KC-135 was clear of the runway. There were other contributing factors which were cited - see related photos and article from "Flight International."

October 2006: The European Commission (EC) updated its list of airlines banned in the (EU), adding Kenya's DAS Air Cargo (DAC) and Uganda's Dairo Air Services (DAR), due to "the serious safety deficiencies identified in these twin airlines in the last few months," as well as Ariana Afghan Airlines (AFG). The (EC) also banned all 27 companies certified in Kyrgyzstan Kyrgyz Air (KYR), owing to "the national control authority's inability to supervise them effectively."

Sixty-eight carriers - - 19 from the Democratic Republic of Congo, 21 from Liberia, 18 from Sierra Leone, and 10 from Swaziland - - have been removed, as they ceased operating because they lost their Air Operator's Certificates (AOC)s. Eight recently created airlines in the (DRC) have been added. Air Services Comores of Comoros, previously banned outright, now is subject to operational restrictions, and will be allowed to operate services bound for Europe with an airplane recently fitted with appropriate safety equipment. The (EC) also decided to keep Phuket Air and Air Koryo on the list.

The Commission and the member states' aviation safety experts examined six other individual cases, including Pulkovo Aviation (STG), Pakistan International Airways (PIA), Ghana's Johnsons Air and Ajet (the former Helios Airways). It concluded that it did not consider an immediate banning measure was called for on the basis of air safety criteria, but stated that it will "be keeping a watchful eye" on those operators' implementation of the corrective action they and their respective national authorities have promised.

November 2007: The European Commission (EC) issued the sixth update of its airline blacklist, removing Suriname's Blue Wing Airlines and lifting the operating restrictions imposed on Pakistan International Airlines (PIA). Both carriers, however, will remain subject to prioritized ramp inspections at Community airports in order to ensure their "consistent adherence" to relevant safety standards. "This latest revision shows that when airlines take rapid and sound corrective action to comply with safety standards, they can be withdrawn from the list quickly," (EC) VP Transport, Jacques Barrot noted. "It also shows that the list increasingly serves as a preemptive, rather than punitive tool for safeguarding aviation safety." He added that relevant oversight authorities verified measures taken by (PIA) and Blue Wing Airlines and "that these measures provide for long-lasting sustainable solutions to avoid the same problems recurring in the future."

The blacklist now comprises eight individual carriers including TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG), Mahan Air (MHN), and Ukrainian Mediterranean Airlines (UM Air - (UKM)), whose operations are fully banned in the (EU). Also banned are all airlines from Equatorial Guinea (ECV), Indonesia: (AWR); (BLN); (BTV); (DHI); (FES); (GIA); (KTK); (LKW); (MLI); (MND); (NOK); (PNM); (PTF); (REX); (SJA); (TGN); (TMG); (WON); (XPR); Kyrgyzstan: (ITL); (KYR); (PHG); (PHX); (STZ); Liberia: (LBG); Sierra Leone: (ORG); (RUM); (UVL); Swaziland: (AFC); and Democratic Republic of Congo: (TCS); (WDA); & (WET) with the exception of Hewa Bora Airways (EXD), which is subject to operating restrictions). Operational restrictions were placed on Air Bangladesh (BGD) and Air Service Comores (COM).

April 2008: The European Commission (EC) issued a revision of its list of banned airlines, the seventh update since establishment of the blacklist in March 2006. Newcomers are Ukraine Cargo Airways (the third Ukrainian airline after Volare Airlines (VLE) and Ukrainian Mediterranean Airlines) and Hewa Bora Airways (EXD) of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. (EXD) previously was allowed to operate a single airplane under a special arrangement that has ended. Garuda Indonesia (GIA) also remains on the list. "The airline has made progress in the implementation of corrective measures, yet this is not sufficient," the (EC) noted. "Furthermore, the authorities of Indonesia have still to demonstrate that they have completed the corrective action." Following the update, nine individual airlines and all carriers from Equatorial Guinea, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are prohibited from operating in the European Union (EU).

July 2008: The eighth edition of the European Commission (EC)'s blacklist of banned airlines does not include Iran's Mahan Airlines (MHN), thanks to "significant efforts and progress accomplished by this carrier, which were verified during an on-site inspection," but continues to include Indonesian airlines, including Garuda Indonesia (GIA). "The Commission (EC) decided that the Indonesian authorities have still not developed and implemented an efficient oversight program on any of the carriers under their regulatory control," it said. Ukraine Cargo Airways remains banned as well, and Yemenia Airways (YEM) was told it "should complete its corrective actions plan" by the Air Safety Committee's next meeting. All airlines from Equatorial Guinea, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are banned, while Gabon Airlines and Afrijet (FRJ) from Gabon are allowed to maintain operations at their current level.

June 2009: 737-247 (23516, EX-25004), Eastok Air (EAA) leased, ex-Tajik Air (TJK)/East Air (ETJ).

July 2009: Iran's Mahan Air (MHN) was added to the (EU)'s list of banned airlines, while Garuda Indonesia (GIA), Airfast Indonesia (PTF), Mandala Airlines (MND) and Premiair were removed from the "blacklist." The latest update did not include Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM), despite recent controversy following the June 29 A310-300 crash that killed 152 passengers and crew. All airlines from Zambia and Kazakhstan were added to the list with the exception of Air Astana (AKZ), which will be allowed limited access to (EU) nations.

TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG), already on the list of more than >200 carriers, will be allowed to operate "into Portugal only with certain airplanes and under very strict conditions," the European Commission (EC) said, adding that the limited access was granted to acknowledge "progress made by the civil aviation authority of Angola [and TAAG (ANG)] to resolve progressively any safety deficiencies." All other Angolan airlines remain banned. All Indonesian carriers remain banned apart from the aforementioned four. Complete bans are in place on airlines from Benin, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Swaziland.

European Commission VP Transport, Antonio Tajani has called for a global blacklist, a suggestion that has been rejected by (ICAO) for now. "We will not accept that airlines fly at different standards when they operate inside and outside Europe," he said, renewing his call. "It is high time that the international community rethinks its safety policy; those airlines which are unsafe should not be allowed to fly anywhere."

October 2009: Pegasus Airlines (PGS) has formed a joint venture (JV) with state-run, Kyrgyzstan Airlines (KYR), (PGS) General Manager, Sertac Haybat confirmed. (PGS) will have a 49% stake in the (JV) to be named "Kyrgyz Pegasus Airlines (KYR)/(PGS)," which should become operational next month and will begin by offering low-fare flights from Bishkek to Russia, China, Kazakhstan, and Turkey aboard 737NGs wet-leased from (PGS). The number of airplanes has not been determined.

"We want to make Bishkek a hub in Central Asia for flights from east to west. Furthermore, the Bishkek - Istanbul route offers connections through our Sabiha Gokcen airport base to many European destinations we serve," Haybat said, adding that the (JV) offers a way to expand in markets protected by single-designation agreements, "which favor one certain airline in Turkey."

Airlines certified by Kyrgyzstan authorities (the (JV) will use (PGS)'s Turkish Air Operator Certificate (AOC)) are banned from operating to the European Union (EU). However, Haybat strongly dismissed assertions that Kyrgyzstan Airlines' inclusion on the (EU) blacklist will affect the (PGS) image negatively. "We believe the contrary," he argued. "The (PGS) airplanes and its operation by (PGS) flight crew (FC) and maintenance by (PGS) technicians (MT) is the seal of safety in this (JV). (PGS) has an excellent track record when it comes to safety and this will be the same in the new (JV)."

December 2009: Kyrgyz Pegasus Airlines (KYR) is set to launch operations next month - - SEE ATTACHED - - "KYR-2009-12 NEW OPS."

1 737-500 and 2 737-800s Pegasus Airlines (PGS) wet-leased for start of operations next month.

Initially, (KYR) will serve one domestic and six international routes, with Almaty, Beijing, Dubai, Istanbul, Moscow, and Seoul as its destinations. Also plans to gain access to the Russian market and is trying for Moscow and St Petersburg, but a restrictive bilateral means (KYR) does not have the traffic rights to serve these two markets.

May 2010: Turkish (THY) Technic signed a "C" check airplane maintenance services agreement with Kyrgyz Airways (KYR) covering one 737-300.

July 2010: 1 ATR42-300 (213), EX-(OY-PCD), NAC leased.

October 2010: A320 (386, EY-621), delivery.

September 2013: Russia and Kyrgyzstan have begun to liberalize a bilateral agreement regulating flights between the countries. At the end of August, aviation authorities agreed to add up to five weekly frequencies on routes from Moscow to Bishkek and Osh during the upcoming winter.

July 2014: Russian aviation authorities have offered to remove all restrictions on the number of frequencies and destinations between Russia and Kyrgyzstan. Kyrgyzstan representatives said they would be ready to discuss the rule changes later this year.

In addition, Russian authorities have offered to add 26 frequencies to the Moscow - Bishkek route and 20 frequencies on Moscow - Osh for the summer 2014 season, not the winter 2015 season, as earlier announced.

Russian authorities explained that decision based on seat load factors on the routes over >80%. Last year, Russia and Kyrgyzstan added new frequencies on the routes between the countries.

Russia’s industry experts say the bilateral agreements between Russia and former (USSR) republics are sometimes tougher (in an effort to protect local airlines) than those between Russian and European countries. But over the last few years, Russia persuaded several countries to change the rules. In 2011, Russia agreed to liberalize rules with Ukraine. In January 2014, flight rules were liberalized between Russia and Armenia.

November 2015: ACCDT: "Kyrgyz’s Avia Traffic Company 737 crashes on landing" by (ATW) Polina Montag-Girmes, November 25, 2015.

Kyrgyz’s Avia Traffic Company Boeing 737 ran out of runway, while landing at Osh Airport in Kyrgyzstan on November 22. Ten out of 160 people on board were hurt.

Kyrgyz’s Avia Traffic Company (en route from Krasnoyarsk (Russia) to Osh, was forced to land at Bishkek Manas International Airport due to bad weather conditions at Osh), Kyrgyz's public prosecution office said. After refueling and weather conditions improved, the flight to Osh resumed.

However, while landing at Osh the flight crew (FC) detected problems with the right engine and hydraulics, and decided to perform a crash landing. The 737 airplane slipped away on its fuselage underbody along the runway approximately 1,500 meters, before running out of runway. The airplane’s fuselage, engines and wings were seriously damaged.

The airplanes's flight recorders have already been recovered. Kyrgyz authorities have formed an investigation commission. Moscow-based Interstate Aviation Committee representatives are also involved in the investigation process.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
KYR-A300B4-605R
KYR-A320-2010-10
KYR-TU-154M
KYR-TU-154M JUL07

April 2016:

1 737-247 (JT8D-15A HK) (1257-23516, /86 EX-25004), EX-EASTOK AIR (EAA), TAJIK AIR LSD, EX-(TJK)/(ETJ), EX-(EX-531). 8C, 112Y.

1 737-500 (CFM56-3), (PGS) WET-LSD.

2 +2 ORDERS 737-800 (CFM56-7B), (PGS) WET-LSD.

1 +1 ORDER 757-2Q8 (558-26270, EX- ), (TBC) LSD 2004-08.

1 767-300ER (HOL) WET-LSD.

0 MD-83 (JT8D-217) (1003-48039, 3D-MDJ; 1070-49119, /82 3D-ABV), EX-(USA), 2003-07. 2 RTND, LST (RWA) 2004-06. 12C, 130Y.

4 A300B4-603 (411, EX-35009; 414, EX-35008; 546, EX-35007; 553, EX-35010).

1 A300B4-605R (608, EX-35006).

0 A300B4-605R203 (749, TC-OAB), (ONU) WET-LSD 2002-08, RTND 2002-10. RTND 2003-05.

2 A300-600.

2 ORDERS A319-100 (V2500), (DEA) LSD.

0 A320-231 (V2500) (478) RTND 1999-12, LST (SHO).

1 A320-200 (386, EY-621 - - SEE PHOTO - - "KYR-A320-2010-10).

1 ATR42-300 (213, OY-PCD), NAC LSD 2010-07.

1 AN-26B (AI-24VT) (10606, /80 EX-26036), FREIGHTER.

5 AN-28 (TVD-10B), 17Y.

1 IL-76TD (D-30KP-2) (1013409310, /91 EX-76815), FREIGHTER.

1 IL-76TD (D-30KP-2) (0063466989, UR-CAP), 2003-10.

2 IL-76TD (D-30KP-2) (93495863; 93498962), EX-(ARO) 2005-03.

3 TU-134A-3 (D-30-III) (62590, /79 EX-65778; 62602, /79 EX-65779; 62850, /80 EX-65789) (60346 RETIRED 1999-10), 76Y.

3 TU-154B-1 (NK-8-2U) (257, /77 EX-85257; 259, /77 EX-85259; 294, /78 EX-85294). 164Y.

4 TU-154B-2 (NK-8-2U) (444, /80 EX-85444; 497, /81 EX-85497; 519, /81 EX-85519; 590, /83 EX-85590), 164Y.

2 TU-154M (D-30KU-154-II) (EX-00002 - SEE PHOTO 2007-07; 945, /92 EX-85762), 164Y.

5 YAK-40 (9310726, /73 EX-87250; 20828, /73 93; 510239, /75 331; 341631, /73 66; 411030, /74 79; 20434, /74 412), 9420235, EX-87426; LST AEROVISTA 2002-01. 32Y.

Management:
(definitions)

ALI SABANCI, CHAIRMAN (KYR) & (PGS).

AKYLBEK JUMABAEV, PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO).

BAKTYGUL JANADYLOVA, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER (CFO).

NIKOLAY KUCHERENKO, VP MARKETING.

VLADIMIR EREMIN, VP OPERATIONS.

T ARPACHIEV, DIRECTOR FLIGHT OPERATIONS.

MAMAT NAZAROV, DIRECTOR CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT.

AUBAKIR SHATENOV, DIRECTOR PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT.

V F BANBAN, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR.

PAVLENKO ANATOLI POLIKARPOVICH, HEAD ENGINEERING AVIATION SERVICES.

A P PAVOLEV, CHIEF ENGINEER.

A V SAKIN, HEAD MAINTENANCE SUPPLY.

 
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