Please login to access all features of this site
  User Name Password  
7jetset7 Logo 7jetset7 Logo  

7jetset7 Home7jetset7 World Map7jetset7 Airlines7jetset7 Help7jetset7 Account7jetset7 SubscribeFree Content ViewAbout 7jetset77jetset7 FeedbackContact 7jetset7

7jetset7 Blog

    
Airlines

printable version
Name: LAM - LINHAS AEREAS DE MOZAMBIQUE
7JetSet7 Code: LAM
Status: Operational
Region: AFRICA
City: MAPUTO
Country: MOZAMBIQUE
Employees 662
Web: lam.co.mz
Email: lamgcil@lam.co.mz
Telephone: +258 21 465 143
Fax: +258 21 465 134
Sita: MPMN2TM
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
LAM-2009-10-EMB-190
LAM-2014-12 - EMB-190 SABOTAGE NOV 2013
LAM-CABIN ATTENDANTS
LAM-CABIN ATTENDANTS-2009-10
LAM-LOGO
LAM-LOGO - 2012-11
LAM-MAP-FEB09

FORMED IN 1936 AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 1937. WAS FORMED AS DIRECCAO DE EXPLORACAO DOS TRANSPORTES AEREOS (DETA) AS A DIVISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS, HARBORS, AND AIRWAYS. EARLY IN 1980 (DETA) WAS RESTRUCTURED AND NAMED "LAM." A K A "LINEAS AEREAS DE MOCAMBIQUE." SCHEDULED AND CHARTER, DOMESTIC, REGIONAL & INTERNATIONAL, PASSENGER AND CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
ALAMEDA DO AEROPORTO
PO BOX 2060
MAPUTO, MOZAMBIQUE

THE REPUBLIC OF MOZAMBIQUE WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1975, IT COVERS AN AREA OF 801,590 SQ KM, ITS POPULATION IS 19 MILLION, ITS OFFICIAL LANGUAGE IS PORTUGESE, AND ITS CAPITAL CITY IS MAPUTO.

JUNE 1993: TO BEIRA, QUELIMANE, NAMPULA, PEMBA, TETE, LICHINGA, JOHANNESBURG, HARARE, MATAS APA, AND LISBON.

1992 = -14.9% (RPK) (TRAFFIC); -16.25% PASSENGERS (PAX); -6.8% (FTK) (FREIGHT TRAFFIC).

AUGUST 1993: 767-200ER (VF162) DELIVERY, LEASED TO SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA).

JUNE 1995: 1,943 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 20 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 14 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

767 LEASED RETURNED TO (GUI), REPLACED BY L-1011 (TAP) PORTUGAL LEASED.

OCTOBER 1996: 1 F 100 (TAY 650-15), EX-ROYAL SWAZI.

APRIL 1997: THE GOVERNMENT IS TO SELL 80% SHARES: 20% TO EMPLOYEES, 20% GOVERNMENT, 30% FOREIGN INVESTMENT, 30% TO MOZAMBIQUE INVESTORS.

MAY 1997: 1,403 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 20 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 14 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

JUNE 1997: GOVERNMENT PLANS FOR PRIVATIZATION ARE GOING SLOWLY.

SEPTEMBER 1997: FOR PRIVATIZATION, 3 BUYERS WHO HAVE SHOWN INTEREST ARE (TAP) PORTUGAL, AIR MAURITIUS (MAU), & MALAYSIAN (MAS). (MAS) WAS THE MOST AGGRESSIVE, FOR 51%.

DECEMBER 1997: 1 L-1011-500 (1240), AIR MADEIRA (MAE) LEASED.

FEBRUARY 1998: THE GOVERNMENT SCRAPS THE PRIVATIZATION PLAN.

APRIL 1998: TO OPERATE 747SP TO LISBON. WAS RECENTLY RETURNED TO SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA) FROM AIR NAMIBIA (NAM). USED AS CODE SHARE WITH (SAA), VIA JOHANNESBURG.

1,403 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 20 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 14 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT).

JUNE 1998: 1 737-200 (JT8D-9A), EX-MANDALA (MND).

APRIL 1999: 1,403 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 20 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 14 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

NOVEMBER 1999: 1998 = +$343,000 (NET PROFIT).

FEBRUARY 2000: BEECH 1900C-1 (UC-148, N148YV) DELIVERY.

MARCH 2000: 767-2B1ER (PW4060) (26471) RETURNED FROM SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA).

APRIL 2000: 1,403 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 20 Flight Crew (FC), & 14 Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

JULY 2000: 1999 = +$545,000 (+$260,000): 326 MILLION (RPK) TRAFFIC (+10.1%); 47.4% LF LOAD FACTOR; 6.65 MILLION (FTK) FREIGHT TRAFFIC (+12.8%); 1,142 EMPLOYEES.

(http://www.lam.co.mz).

NOVEMBER 2000: TO DUBAI (767-200, WEEKLY).

JANUARY 2001: SINCE AIR PORTUGAL (TAP) HAS RECEIVED COMPLAINTS FROM THE PORTUGESE COMMUNITY IN SOUTH AFRICA, AFTER SUSPENDING ITS SERVICE TO JOHANNESBURG, (TAP) AGREED TO CODE SHARE WITH (LAM), FROM LISBON TO MAPUTO, WITH (LAM) FLYING THE LAST SECTOR TO JOHANNESBURG.

APRIL 2001: 1 737-2NO (23677, C9-BAG), ZIMBABWE (ZMB) LEASED.

JUNE 2001: 1 767-2B1 (26471, /93 C9-BAF), WET-LEASED TO AIR LUXOR (LXA) TIL NOVEMBER 2001.

OCTOBER 2001: 1 737-236 (712-21808, /80 46 32 CC-CZL), EX-BRITISH AIRWAYS (BAB)/LAN (LAN), GECAS (GEF) LEASED.

April 2002: 1,153 employees (including 38 Flight Crew (FC); 76 Cabin Attendants (CA); & 250 Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

SITA: MPMN2TM.

Owners/Shareholders: Government (80%); Airline employees (20%).

Domestic, scheduled services: Beira; Lichinga; Nampula; Pemba; Quelimane; Tete; & Vilanculos.

International, scheduled services: Harare; Johannesburg; & Lisbon.

1 737-2K9 (23405), Boeing Capital (TBC) leased.

October 2002: The government offers a 51% stake of its 80% holding in the limited liability company to a strategic partner. Currently, the balance of ownership is with management and employees. (LAM) has considerable debt, including $36 Million, owed to Boeing (TBC), for its 767-200ER lease, and is attempting to sell the airplane to TACV Cabo Verde (TCV), for $28 Million.

November 2002: 2001 = -150.6 Billion Meticals/-$6.4 Million (-161 Billion Meticals/-$6.7 Million): due to higher finance charges, and unfavorable currency exchanges.

April 2003: 914 employees.

June 2003: 1,150 employees. (commercial@lam.co.mz).

737-205 (23464, C9-BAJ), Celtic Capital leased.

July 2003: 2002 = +$188,000 (-$3.92 Million): 402 Million (RPK) traffic (+13.5%); 63.2% LF load factor; 284,000 passengers (PAX) (+6.7%); 7.21 Million (FTK) freight traffic (+4.5%).

December 2003: Pemba - Johannesburg (737, weekly).

May 2004: 767-2B1ER (26471) sold to AeroMexico (AMX).

August 2004: 737-2B1C (20536) sold to Aergo Capital.

January 2005: Air Luxor (LXA) and Linhas Aereas de Mozambique (LAM) signed an agreement to launch (in April 2005) joint operations, Lisbon - Maputo (A330, 2 class, weekly). This is part of (LXA) 's strategy to operate to Portugese speaking countries in a joint venture regime.

May 2005: 836 employees (including 30 Flight Crew (FC); 41 Cabin Attendants (CA); & Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

737-282 (23043, C9-BAK), ex-Casino Express (CIN), TEM Enterprises leased.

August 2005: Belgian and French aviation regulatory authorities, as promised are providing via the Internet the names of airlines that have been banned from operating to their respective countries. The Belgian Ministry of Transport listed nine carriers on its website, all of them cargo airlines and most of them from Africa. The website of the French (DGAC) identified five airlines on its blacklist: Air Koryo (KOY), Air St Thomas, International Air Service, (LAM), and Phuket Airlines (PHK).

June 2006: (LAM) Mozambique will inaugurate direct service from Maputo to Nairobi on June 25th. The airline will operate 2 flights a week via Pemba, on Wednesdays & Sundays, using a 737-200.

April 2008: 737-205 (23467, C9-BAO), ex-Aviacsa (AEJ), ex-(XA-ABC), (IAP) leased, delivery.

June 2008: As the national flag carrier, Linhas Aereas de Mozambique - (LAM) operates scheduled services in southern Africa, and to Lisbon in Europe.

Employees = 662.

(IATA) Code: TM - 068. (ICAO) Code: LAM (Callsign - MOZAMBIQUE).

Parent organization/shareholders: Government of Mozambique (80%) & employees (20%).

Airline subsidiaries/shareholdings: Mozambique EXpresso (100%).

Alliances: South African Airways (SAA); & (TAP) Portugal.

Main Base: Maputo International Airport (MPM).

Domestic, Scheduled Destinations: Beira; Chimoio; Inhambane; Lichinga; Maputo; Nampula; Pemba; Quelimane; Tete; & Vilanculos.

International, Scheduled Destinations: Dar Es Salaam; Durban; Harare; Johannesburg; Lisbon; & Nairobi.

October 2008: (LAM) Mozambique Airlines received its (IATA) (ITA) Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) certification.

(LAM) Mozambique Airlines signed a contract for two EMB-190s plus two purchase rights. The deal is valued at $75 million if all airplanes are purchased. The first delivery is scheduled for the second half of 2009.

December 2008: (LAM) Mozambique Airlines acquired a DHC-8-Q400 from an unidentified third party and will take delivery of a second "in the near future," Bombardier announced. (LAM) currently operates four 737-200s and two Jetstream 41s.

January 2009: 2008 = +$1.5 million profit.

August 2009: EMB-190 (0301, C9-EMA "COBUE" - - SEE PHOTO - - "LAM-EMB-190-2009-08"), delivery.

September 2009: 25 Flight Crew (FC) and 10 cadet pilots (FC).

EMB-190 (0309, C9-EMB "Chiloane"), delivery. All 737s to be phased out by April 2010.

October 2009: 737-2K9 (23405), returned to lessor and leased for 12 months to Air Malawi (AML).

August 2010: As the national flag carrier, Linhas Aereas de Mozambique - (LAM) operates scheduled services in southern Africa, and to Lisbon in Europe.

Employees = 662.

(IATA) Code: TM - 068. (ICAO) Code: LAM (Callsign - MOZAMBIQUE).

Parent organization/shareholders: Government of Mozambique (80%) & employees (20%).

Airline subsidiaries/shareholdings: Mozambique Expresso (100%).

Alliances: Kenya Airways (KEN); South African Airways (SAA); & (TAP) Portugal.

Main Base: Maputo International Airport (MPM).

Domestic, Scheduled Destinations: Beira; Chimoio; Inhambane; Lichinga; Maputo; Nampula; Pemba; Quelimane; Tete; & Vilanculos.

International, Scheduled Destinations: Dar Es Salaam; Durban; Harare; Johannesburg; Lisbon; & Nairobi.

(LAM), the national airline of Mozambique, will be joined on the Maputo - Luanda route by TAAG (ANG), the national airline of Angola.

May 2011: African Airlines Association (AFRAA) reiterated its strong criticism of the European Union (EU)'s "continued unilateral practice of blacklisting of mainly African states and airlines with no visible benefits in enhancing safety on the continent" and called on African governments, the African Union and the African Civil Aviation Commission to not "allow this state of affairs to continue as the continent's air transport industry is being progressively destroyed."

The statement follows the European Commission (EC)'s April decision to prohibit all carriers certified in Mozambique and two Air Madagascar (MAD) 767s from operating to (EU) airports. The (EC) cited "significant safety deficiencies requiring decisive action in both cases." Mozambique is the 14th African state to be subject to a blanket ban; an additional four African states are subject to either a partial ban or have an individual carrier that has been restricted from operating to the (EU).

In a statement, (AFRAA) called the (EU) blacklist a "public relations exercise" that acts as "a blunt instrument that constrains the development of a viable African air transport industry in Africa." It continued, "While the net losers are African carriers, the net beneficiaries are always the (EU) community carriers that swiftly step in to fill the vacuum and take the market share of the banned airlines. (EU) carriers will continue to operate with increased frequencies and higher yields to Mozambique and the other states that are the subject of the ban. If the airspace of an African country is unsafe, it is unsafe also for European carriers who continue to fly the African skies for commercial benefit."

The organization pointed out that (LAM) Mozambique Airlines has had no major accidents since it was established in 1980 and no accidents of any kind since 1989. It noted that a number of European airlines "can make no such claim. However, [LAM's] impeccable safety record … has not spared it from the (EU) blanket banning. The (AFRAA) fails to see how such blanket banning contributes to encourage African carriers which strive to achieve industry best practices in safety standards."

(LAM) said it will be able to continue offering Maputo - Lisbon service despite Mozambique's addition to the (EU) blacklist by wet-leasing a 767-300ER from Portuguese wet-lease (ACMI) provider euroAtlantic (MAE).

May 2011: Ethiopian Airlines (ETH) and (LAM) Air Mozambique will code share on Addis Ababa - Maputo service.

December 2011: Large reserves of natural gas have been found off the Mozambique coast.

January 2012: Nine African airlines have come together to purchase airplane fuel jointly, a move the carriers believe will increase their leverage and raise the value and quality of fuel being procured.

According to the African Airlines Association (AFRAA), the nine airlines participating in the program include Kenya Airways (KEN), Ethiopian Airlines (ETH), Air Malawi (AML), Air Namibia (NAM), Air Seychelles (ASY), (LAM) Mozambique Airlines, Precision Air (PRT), Rwandair (RWA) and TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG).

The (AFRAA), which said more of its 32 members could join the program in the future, stated that the joint fuel buying project "is aimed at attaining better and stable unit price of fuel for the participating airlines, assuring quality of the product and supply reliability whilst the relevant fuel suppliers will benefit from higher fuel volumes purchased by airlines. Other areas of focus include addressing the incidents of high taxes, charges and fees levied on fuel, especially in African airports, and lobbying stakeholders for the elimination of monopoly fuel suppliers at some airports."

The carriers will purchase about 700 million liters of fuel in aggregate annually valued at about $1.5 billion. Fuel purchasing contracts for this year have already been jointly negotiated by the nine carriers, the (AFRAA) said. While negotiations are being conducted by the carriers on a joint basis, fuel contracting will still be done by individual airlines.

"The contracts implementation dates will vary, with some airlines starting to purchase fuel under the [jointly] negotiated terms in February 2012," the (AFRAA) stated. "All contracts will, however, end in December 2012 and [be] replaced by new contracts for a full calendar year in 2013 and subsequent years following another bidding, evaluation, negotiation and awarding process to be carried out [jointly by the carriers] during the course of this year."

November 2012: (GE) Capital Aviation Services Limited (GECAS) (GEF), announced delivery of a leased 737-500 to Lineas Aereas De Mocambique (LAM), the flag carrier of Mozambique.

(LAM), along with its subsidiary Mozambique Express (MEX), operates 10 airplanes to destinations in Africa from its base in Maputo, Mozambique.

January 2013: Kenya Airways (KEN) is expanding its influence in the African market by aligning itself with smaller carriers as it seeks to build its home base of Nairobi as a continental hub. This includes promoting greater cross-border cooperation and fostering economic development among nations which jealously guard their independence, despite the clear evidence that this has been a fundamental cause of their problems.

(KEN) as Africa’s fourth largest carrier and the continent's only member of the SkyTeam (STM) alliance is focusing on airlines in southern Africa, having already brought (LAM) Mozambique Airlines, Air Botswana (BOT), Air Malawi (AML) and TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG) into the fold.

On 20 December 2012, (KEN) and RwandAir (RWA) announced plans to form a strategic partnership and build stronger relations including improved synergies in scheduling, reservation systems and a combined frequent flyer plan. The partnership will also strengthen the airlines' cargo, maintenance and flight training operations.

Meanwhile, Ethiopian Airways (ETH) looks to strengthen its Addis Ababa hub, as the Gulf carriers (now partnering with some global alliance airlines) expand their global networks across Africa.

April 2013: (LAM) Mozambique inaugurated flights on the 1,700 km route from Nampula (APL), the largest city and main business center of northern Mozambique, to Johannesburg (JNB) in South Africa, on 28 April. Daily flights are now offered on the route in competition with South African Airways (SAA) service of the same frequency, and operated using ERJ 145s. Only two other international destinations are offered by (LAM) Mozambique from Nampula: – Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania, and Nairobi in Kenya, both served with twice-weekly flights.

June 2013: Embraer EMB-190-100AR (0581, C9-EMC "Chaimite"), delivery.

November 2013: ACCDT: Recovery teams from (LAM) Mozambique Airlines and disaster management firm, Kenyon International have arrived in Namibia, headed for the crash site of a (LAM) Mozambique Embraer EMB-190.

The airplane, which was carrying 29 passengers and six crew, crashed in northern Namibia killing all on board. EMB-190-100AR (0581, /09 C9-EMC) was operating as flight TM470 from Maputo to Luanda, when it was reported missing November 29.

“This morning, recovery teams from (LAM) and Kenyon International arrived in Namibia and are making their way to the accident site. The Namibian and our recovery teams have begun to search for and recover the victims’ remains and their personal effects,” said (LAM) Mozambique in an update issued at 1500 local time December 1.

(LAM) also confirmed the nationalities of those on board. The 27 passengers comprised 10 Mozambique citizens, nine from Angola, five from Portugal, plus individuals from France, China and Brazil. The investigation will be led by the Namibian authorities, with assistance from Angola, Brazil, Mozambique and the USA National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). Embraer has also sent technicians to assist with the investigation.

The airplane’s captain (FC), first officer (FC), three cabin crew (CA) and a technician (MT) died in the accident. The captain had accumulated 9,053 flying hours, including 1,395 in command and 2,520 on the Embraer EMB-190. He received his command on April 12, 2012. The first officer (FC) had logged 1,418 flight hours, including 108 on the Embraer EMB-190.

(LAM) said the airplane and engines underwent routine maintenance on November 28.

December 2013: ACCDT: (last month's continued): Preliminary investigations into the (LAM) Mozambique Embraer EMB-190 crash on November 29 have not revealed any evidence of mechanical failure.

The EMB-190, which was carrying 27 passengers and six crew, crashed during a scheduled flight from Maputo to Luanda on November 29, killing all on board. The wreckage was found November 30 in a remote part of northern Namibia.

In his preliminary report, Captain Ericksson Nengola from the Namibian Transport Ministry said good progress has been made during the investigation, aided by the cockpit voice (CVR) and flight data recorders (FDR), which survived the “tremendous impact” of the crash.

Early findings show the EMB-190, operating as flight TM470, crashed at around 1300 local time in the Kavango region, which is located in the far north of Namibia, bordering Angola and Botswana. “The cockpit voice and flight data recorders showed no evidence of mechanical failure,” Nengola said. He added the investigation is still ongoing and the full preliminary report will be issued within 30 days of the accident, which falls just before the New Year.

Mozambique (CAA) Instituto de Aviacao Civil de Mocambique (IACM) President, Joao Martins de Abreu said the flight data and cockpit voice recorders have been sent to the USA for reading and decoding.

The Mozambican airliner that crashed in Namibia last month, killing all 33 people on board, descended with its automatic pilot on and its altitude selector set to below ground level, according to a preliminary report released this weekend.

The report by experts from Namibia’s Transport Ministry said the (LAM) Embraer EMB-190, on a November 29 flight from Maputo to Angola, was “flying in normal conditions and no mechanical deficiency was detected” when it suddenly began a descent from its normal cruising altitude.

It crashed in a Namibian game park, killing the 27 passengers and six crew on board. The report, released to media by Mozambique’s Civil Aviation Institute at the weekend and based on the plane’s black box flight recordings, said the fact that the airplane made the descent on autopilot, and after actions that would have required knowledge of its systems, denoted a “clear intention.”

But the document, seen by "Reuters," did not spell out what this intention was and added “the reason for all these actions is unknown and the investigation is continuing.” According to the report, the flight recordings showed changes to the plane’s speed and altitude had been made manually, including the altitude selector being set it to a level below ground level.

It said the commander (FC), Herminio dos Santos, was alone in the cockpit at the time of the crash, after his co-pilot (FC) had gone to the bathroom. Alarms going off could be heard on the flight recordings, and also the sound of someone beating on the cockpit door “as if asking to be let in.” it added. Asked by journalists in Maputo whether the report meant dos Santos had deliberately crashed the plane, Mozambique’s Civil Aviation Chief, Joao Abreu declined to give an answer.

Asked the same question, Mozambique’s Transport Ministry spokesman, Verlopes Nhampossa told "Reuters" the Mozambican government and Civil Aviation authorities were not in a position to “make interpretations” of the experts’ report.

(LAM) Mozambique is pressing for further information after preliminary investigations revealed its Embraer EMB-190 crash on November 29 could have been deliberately caused by the airplane’s Captain (FC).

Namibia, which is leading the investigation, had said there was a tremendous impact and no evidence of mechanical failure. A (LAM) spokeswoman said: “The preliminary cause of the accident is that it was intentional. They [Mozambique (CAA) Instituto de Aviação Civil de Moçambique] held the press conference [detailing the preliminary findings] and it was new to us, just like it was for everybody else. We are shocked.”

The (IACM) could not immediately be reached for comment. However, local media quoted (IACM) President, Joao Martins de Abreu as saying there were signs of “clear intention” to crash the airplane.

The co-pilot (FC) reportedly left the cockpit to use the toilet. He was then locked out by the Captain, who dramatically reduced the airplanes’s altitude and ignored various automated warnings ahead of the high-speed impact. According to (LAM), the Captain had accumulated a total of 9,053 flight hours, including 2,520 on the EMB-190. He received his command April 12, 2012 and had logged 1,395 hours as a Captain. He went through his last medical evaluation on September 2, 2013.

(LAM) said it is deeply concerned about the latest findings and is waiting on further information from the Namibian authorities. “(LAM) will request a detailed report, which shows and proves the facts which led the preliminary conclusions of the statement and will continue to cooperate fully with the investigating authorities,” the airline said.

The EMB-190 was carrying 27 passengers and six crew members when it crashed during a scheduled flight from Maputo to Luanda on November 29, killing all on board. The wreckage was found November 30 in a remote part of northern Namibia, bordering Angola and Botswana.

February 2014: (LAM) Mozambique has ordered three Boeing 737-700s, and taken purchase rights on a further three, in a deal valued at $228 million at list prices.

The order, which was announced February 5, was signed in November 2013 and allocated to an unidentified customer on Boeing’s order book.
“(LAM) Mozambique has developed an in-depth strategic business plan, which resulted in the restructuring of its network to facilitate its growth and expansion,” (LAM) Mozambique (CEO), Marlene Manave said, adding that (LAM) will use the 737-700s to expand into several new markets.

The 737-700s will be fitted with Boeing’s latest Performance Improvement Package (PIP), which gives an extra +2% fuel efficiency.

Maputo-based LAM, which operates a fleet of Boeing 737-500s and other smaller regional airplanes, is hoping to tap growing demand triggered by Mozambique’s oil, gas and other hydrocarbon reserves.

“A strong aviation infrastructure with a modern fleet of Next-Generation 737 jetliners will be of enormous benefit to the people of Mozambique, business travelers and our tourism industry, and will substantially contribute to our economic development,” Manave said.

March 2014: (LAM) - Linhas Aéreas de Moçambique ((IATA) Code: TM, based at Maputo) is set to take delivery of its first 737-700 (33792, C9-BAQ), formerly with AeroMéxico (AMX). The 737-700 is currently in full colors in San José Juan Santamaría awaiting its ferry flight to Maputo where it will join (LAM)'s other fleet of two EMB-190s and a 737-500.

With three 737-700s on order from Boeing (TBC) with delivery scheduled for 2015, 2016 and 2017, Mozambican national carrier (LAM) intends to use the airplane to increase its network coverage of Southern Africa.

(LAM) currently operates 4 airplanes, and serves 6 countries, 16 destinations, 42 routes and 50 daily flights.

December 2014: News Item A-1: (LAM) - Linhas Aéreas de Moçambique resumed scheduled operations to the north-eastern port town of Nacala on Monday, December 7, following the facility's 3-year long renovation program.

In line with the city's growing economic prominence, Mozambique invested over >USD100 million into the project, which now boasts 16 check-in desks, two departure lounges (for domestic and international flights), an extended primary runway, and a cargo handling terminal.

Using its (MEX) - Mocambique Expresso subsidiary's ERJ-145s, (LAM) will operate a 3x weekly service to Maputo with plans to open up flights to Mumbai International and Dubai International when additional 737-700s arrive later next year.

News Item A-2: See attached - - "LAM-2014-12 - EMB-190 SABOTAGE NOV 2013" by Flight International's David Kaminski-Morrow, London.

September 2015: The Mozambican state-run airports and aeronautical infrastructure management firm Aeroportos de Moçambique (ADM) is planning to reduce the number of the country's international gateways from the current eight, to just three.

Speaking in the capital, Maputo, the Cchairman of (ADM), Emanuel Chaves, said the move would ensure maximum use is made of the newly refurbished airports of Maputo, Beira, and Nacala, where government has spent over >USD500 million in upgrades and renovations.

The three international-standard airports are to act as gateways to Mozambique's southern, central, and northern regions, while those at Nampula, Pemba, Tete, Inhambane, and Vilanculos are to be downgraded to offering domestic operations exclusively.

Their closure is expected to greatly benefit local carriers, albeit at the expense of regional connectivity. The tourist towns of Inhambane, Pemba, and Vilanculos are expected to suffer significantly as a result of the change given that they enjoy direct flights to Johannesburg O R Tambo, the largest source of South African tourists.

While Mozambique's aviation landscape is currently dominated by state-run (LAM) - Linhas Aéreas de Moçambique ((IATA) Code: TM, based at Maputo) and its (MEX) - Mocambique Expresso ((ICAO) Code: MXE, basd at Maputo) subsidiary, low cost carrier (LCC) start-ups (MAIS) - Mozambican Airlines (Nacala) and Mozambique flyafrica (Maputo) are expected to change that, when they launch later in the year.

(LAM) - Linhas Aéreas de Moçambique currently operates 8 airplanes to 5 countries to 15 destinations, on 39 routes and 46 daily flights.



NOTE: LINHAS AEREAS DE MOZAMBIQUE (LAM) is listed on the latest (EU) blacklist released 03.04.2012 of airlines whose operations are subject to a ban within the (EU)*. *Airlines listed in Annex A could be permitted to exercise traffic rights by using wet-leased airplanes of an air carrier which is not subject to an operating ban, provided that the relevant safety standards are complied with.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
LAM-EMB-190-2014-03
LAM-EMB-190-AUG09

April 2016:

0 737-2B1 (JT8D-9) (323-20786, /73 C9-BAD), SCRAPPED 1998-11.

0 737-2B1C (JT8D-9) (289-20536, /71 C9-BAC "LUGENDA"), ST AERGO CAPITAL 2004-08. 16C, 88Y/F.

1 737-2K9 (JT8D-15A HK) (1176-23404, /85 C9-BAK "BAZARUTO"), (TBC) LSD 2005-06. 122Y.

0 737-2K9 (JT8D-17) (1178-23405, /85 C9-BAI "LURIO"), (TBC) LSD 2002-04. RTND & LST 12 MTHS TO (AML) 2009-10. 16C, 88Y.

0 737-2N0 (JT8D-17A) (1313-23677, /86 C9-BAG "LIMPOPO"), (ZMB) LSD 2001-04. RTND 2005-07. 16C, 88Y.

1 737-205 (JT8D-17) (1223-23464, /86 C9-BAJ "PEMBA"), CELTIC CAPITAL LSD 2003-06. 16C, 88Y.

1 737-205 (JT8D-17 HK) (1245-23467, /86 C9-BAO "QUIRIMBAS"), EX-AVIACSA (AEJ), EX-(XA-ABC), (IAP) LSD 2008-04. 120Y.

1 737-236 (JT8D-15A) (712-21808, /80 C9-BAH "SAVE"), EX-(BAB)/(LAN), (GEF) LSD 2001-10. 16C, 88Y.

1 737-261 ADV (JT8D-9A) (224-20280, /69 C9-BAA), EX-(MND) 1998-06. 16C, 88Y.

1 737-282 (JT8D-17A HK) (972-23043, /83 C9-BAK "BAZARUTO"), EX-(CIN) 2005-06. TEM ENTERPRISES LEASED. 122Y.

1 737-500 (CFM56-3C) (GEF) LSD 2012-11.

1 737-700 (CFM56-7B) (33792, C9-BAQ), EX-(AMX).

0 767-2B1ER (PW4056) (511-26471, /93 C9-BAF "ZAMBEZE"), RF (SAA) 2000-03, WET-LST (LXA) TIL 2001-11. ST (AMX) 2004-06. 22C, 164Y.

0 L-1011-500 (1240), (MAE) LSD. RTND.

2 BOMBARDIER DHC-8-Q400 (PW150A) (4019, /00 C9-AUL "GORONGOSA;" 4020, /00 C9-AUM), MOZAMBIQUE EXPRESS OPS 2008-11. 72Y.

0 FAIRCHILD DORNIER METRO III. RTND.

1 EMBRAER EMB-120ER BRASILIA (PW118) (129, /89 3D-BIN), NACT LSD, 29Y.

3 +1 OPTIONS EMBRAER EMB-190-100AR (CF34) (0301, C9-EMA "COBUE" 8/09 - - SEE PHOTO - - "LAM-EMB-190-2009-08;" 0309, C9-EMB "CHILOANE" 2009-09; 0581, /09 C9-EMC "CHAIMITE" - - DESTROYED IN ACCDT 2013-11), 9C, 84Y.

1 F 100 (TAY 650-15) (11335, /91 3D-ALM "LUMBELUZI"), EX-ROYAL SWAZI, FOR SALE. 20C, 75Y.

2 CASA C212-200 AVIOCAR. OPS FOR MOZAMBIQUE EXPRESS.

1 BEECH KINGAIR B200C. OPS FOR MOZAMBIQUE EXPRESS.

1 RAYTHEON BEECH 1900C-1 (PT6A-65B) (UC-148, /91 N148YV) 2000-02, (RAY) LSD. 19Y.

6 CESSNA 402, OPS FOR MOZAMBIQUE EXPRESS.

2 PARTENAVIA 068C. OPS FOR MOZAMBIQUE EXPRESS.

1 AN-26 (AI-24VT), FREIGHTER.

1 IL-62MK (VIP).

Management:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
LAM-3-CAPTAIN JOAO DE ABREU-2009-1009

JOSE RICARDO DE ZUZARTE VIEGAS, CHAIRMAN & MANAGING DIRECTOR.

MS MARLENE MANAVE, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO).

CAPTAIN JOAO MARTINS DE ABREU, EXECUTIVE VP TECHNICAL & OPERATIONS.

JEREMIAS TCHAMO, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR.

MAHOMED BASHIR, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, (engineering@lam.co.mz) (mommttm@lam.co.mz).

AUGUSTO CARDOSO JNR, FINANCIAL DIRECTOR.

ADRITO MACABA, COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR.

ATANAZIO KLIRONOMUS, HUMAN RESOURCES (HR) DIRECTOR.

LOURENCO GUILELE, PURCHASE & STORES DIRECTOR.

CARLOS SITOE, CORPORATE PLANNING MANAGER.

R MARTINS, ENGINEERING & PLANNING MANAGER.

A GONCALVES, QUALITY CONTROL (QC) MANAGER.

ANTONIO NEVES, MAINTENANCE MANAGER

 
Top of Page

 

Since you are not logged in, we can show you only live Airtran Airways data. This page will demonstrate the depth of data we have for every airline. Close and View Airtran Airways ›