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Airlines

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Name: AIR MALTA
7JetSet7 Code: MLT
Status: Operational
Region: EUROPE
City: LUQA
Country: MALTA
Employees 900
Web: airmalta.com
Email: info@airmalta.com.mt
Telephone: +356 22999000
Fax: +356 21673241
Sita: MLAPRKM
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
MLT-2004-02 A319 DELIVERY
MLT-2004-08 A320
MLT-2004-11 MALTA JOINS EU
MLT-2005-01 - 737
MLT-2005-04 - A319
MLT-2007-STATS
MLT-2012-04 - A320-214
MLT-2012-07 - NEW LOOK
MLT-2012-08 - NEW LIVERY
MLT-FLIGHT AND CABIN CREW-2014-04
MLT-LOGO-A
MLT-MAINTENANCE MRO LTK 2004-09
MLT-MAINTENANCE MRO LTK-2002-06-A
MLT-MAINTENANCE MRO LTK-2002-06-B
MLT-VISIT VALLETTA

FORMED IN 1973 AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 1974. DOMESTIC, REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL, SCHEDULED & CHARTER, PASSENGER AND CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
HEAD OFFICE
LUQA LQA 05, MALTA

THE REPUBLIC OF MALTA WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1964, IS AN ISLAND COVERING 316 SQUARE KM, WITH CAPITAL NAMED VALLETTA, ITS OFFICIAL LANGUAGES ARE ENGLISH AND MALTESE, AND ITS POPULATION IS .4 MILLION.

AIR MALTA (MLT) WAS FOUNDED BY THE MALTESE GOVERNMENT. (MLT) BEGAN OPERATIONS WITH 2 WET-LEASED 720B AIRPLANES. AIR MALTA (MLT) HAS DIVERSIFIED ITS ACTIVITIES THROUGH INVESTMENTS WITHIN THE TOURIST INDUSTRY.

Air Malta (MLT) was set up by a Resolution of Malta's House of Representatives on 21st March, 1973 and was registered as a limited liability company on 30th March, 1973. The previous day, the Prime Minister as Minister for Civil Aviation had granted the company an Air Service Licence valid for ten years with effect from 1st April 1973. The licence was granted subject to the condition that the substantial ownership and effective control of the airline would, at all times, be held and exercised by the Government of Malta and/or by citizens of Malta and/or by companies incorporated under the laws of Malta and controlled by citizens of Malta.

In the words of its charter, Air Malta (MLT)'s primary aim is to establish, maintain, develop and operate air transport services to and from Malta which, by the carriage of passengers, freight and mail, serve the national interest. Air Malta (MLT) carries out these services under the regulation of the Maltese Department of Civil Aviation that has issued Air Malta a JAR-OPS 1 Air Operator’s Certificate signifying that its operations’ safety level is similar to other European airlines that are regulated under the same standard of operation.

Air Malta (MLT) started flying operations with two wet-leased Boeing 720Bs from Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) on 1st April 1974 with scheduled services to London, Birmingham, Manchester, Rome, Frankfurt, Paris, and Tripoli. Its schedule now serves around 50 destinations in Europe, North Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean.

Currently, Air Malta (MLT) has a fleet of airplanes consisting of A320s, A319s and 737-300s.

Malta lies in the heart of the Mediterranean Sea, halfway between Europe’s mainland and North Africa. The archipelago consists of 6 islands with a total area of only 216 sq km.

Malta and Gozo are the two largest islands and are densely populated with just over 400,000 inhabitants. Comino is small and sparsely populated, while Cominotto, Filfla, and St Paul’s Islands have no inhabitants.

The Maltese Islands may be small, but still have lots to offer visitors! The country’s strategic position between Europe and Africa made it a valuable possession for the great powers that dominated Europe in ancient times, and so it has a rich and varied history. It was occupied by the Phoenicians, the Aragonese, the Romans, the Arabs, the Knights, the French, and the British. All these left their mark on the islands, ranging from Catacombs, Roman Villas and Baths, Fortifications and Towers, Cathedrals, and Churches.

One of the most important milestones in the history of Malta is definitely the rule by the Order of the Knights of St John. In 1530, the Grand Master, Philippe Villiers de L'Isle-Adam was given the Maltese Islands for his order, by King Charles V in exchange of a single Maltese falcon per year. The Knights used the city of Birgu (Vittoriosa) as their naval base. They fortified the towers that already existed in Malta and built various others.

Most of these towers and fortifications are still standing. The Knights led Malta through one of the most important battles that Malta ever experienced, that of the Great Siege of 1565 against the Ottoman Empire. In 1566, after this hard earned victory, Grand Master, Jean Parisot de la Valette decided to build a new fortified city. This gave birth to the present capital city of Malta, Valletta.

Valletta was built on the Xiberras peninsula overlooking two main harbours in Malta, the Grand Harbour and the Marsamxett Harbour. Back in 1830, the city was described as "a city of palaces built by gentlemen for gentlemen". The whole city was added to Unesco’s World Heritage List in 1980. It boasts fine baroque architecture, most of which dates back to the 16th century. One of the most important buildings is St John’s Co-Cathedral with interior paintings by Mattia Preti. One can also view the famous painting by Caravaggio ‘The Beheading of St John the Baptist” in the Co-Cathedral's Oratory. The reign of the Knights of the Order of St John came to an end when Napoleon took Malta on his way to Egypt in 1798.

Malta is a place for diversity. You could spend a day walking around the narrow winding streets of the medieval city Mdina, and then enjoy the nightlife that Sliema, St Julians and Bugibba offer. Alternatively, you could visit one of the prehistoric temples like the Hal Saflieni Hypogeum and Hagar Qim, both of which are included in the Unesco World Heritage list, and then enjoy some hours of sunshine on the golden beaches around the island.

Getting around Malta is relatively easy and cheap. Crossing the main island, Malta, by car from North to South is the longest possible journey one can take – and this only takes around 1 hour by car! Driving in Malta is on the left hand side of the road, like the United Kingdom.

Those visitors who prefer not to rent a car, can use the network of public buses which is cheap and efficient. The main terminus is in Valletta, and in addition there are direct buses to the most popular towns, beaches and cities from Sliema, Bugibba, Mosta, Rabat, Cirkewwa, and Marsaxlokk.

If you are interested in visiting the sister islands of Gozo or Comino, you can do so by taking a short ferry ride. The ferry to Gozo leaves regularly from Cirkewwa and takes around 20 minutes to cross over to Mgarr in Gozo. From Cirkewwa you can also take a small boat that leaves for Comino.

Malta gained its independence in 1964, and joined the European Union in May 2004. The currency used is Maltese Lira, although some establishments also accept Euro, Sterling, and USA Dollars. In 2007, most Maltese shops have adopted a dual price display policy (Maltese Lira and Euro) since the Euro currency was introduced in January 2008 to replace the Maltese Lira. Shopping hours are usually from 9:30 am till 12:30 am, and from 4:30 pm till 7:00 pm from Monday to Saturday.

The national language is Maltese, a language of Semitic origin with a romantic influence. However, the majority of the population can speak good English. Italian, French, and German are also spoken in most hotels.

Malta enjoys a Mediterranean climate with mild winters and hot summers, so it is always a good time of year to visit Malta!

MARCH 1982: A major milestone for Air Malta (MLT) was reached on 30th March 1982. After several months of intensive evaluation of various airplane types from different manufacturers, the Maltese national flag-carrier signed an agreement with Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (TBC) for the purchase of three 737-200 Advanced airplanes. Their delivery in March 1983 coincided with the airline's tenth anniversary celebrations. These first-ever brand-new airplanes soon became the backbone of Air Malta (MLT)'s fleet.

Air Malta (MLT) is a firm believer in the importance of the fullest possible utilisation of airplanes. Within six months after taking delivery of its first three 737 airplanes, the Maltese flag-carrier established a world record with the highest utilisation for all operators of the aircraft type: 14.9 hours per airplane per day in September 1983. In its very first year of A320 service the airline achieved some of the highest utilisation figures of the type worldwide.

AUGUST 1986: Air Malta (MLT) purchased two more 737-200As, which were delivered in July 1987. The purchase was financed through a US$40-million credit facility from a consortium of ten international banks. This was the first-ever international financing for a Maltese borrower, and it was a source of considerable satisfaction to Air Malta (MLT) that the loan, mandated to Chase Investment Bank, was oversubscribed in syndication.

FEBRUARY 1987: Air Malta (MLT) signed two other agreements: one for delivery of an A320-200 airliner, delivered in August 1990, and another for the sixth 737-200A, delivered in March 1988. Also, in 1987 Air Malta (MLT) sold two 720Bs, leaving just one in the fleet.

MARCH 1989: Air Malta (MLT) exercised its option for a second A320-200, delivered in March 1992. The following month, it ordered three new 737 airplanes (eventually deciding on the 737-300 series) for delivery in March, April, and May 1993. The last remaining 720B was withdrawn from the fleet late in 1989.

FEBRUARY 1992: Air Malta (mlt) was actively involved in the planning of the new air terminal at Malta International Airport, which was officially inaugurated on 8th February 1992.

JANUARY 1993: 96% GOVERNMENT OWNED. OWNS 30% (EXB).

1992 = +$16 MILLION (NET PROFIT) RECORD!: +15.4% (RPK) TRAFFIC, +18.3% PASSENGERS (PAX), +13.5% (FTK) FREIGHT TRAFFIC; 1,700 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 120 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 180 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

AIRLINE'S 20TH YEAR ANNIVERSARY!

FEBRUARY 1993: Air Malta (MLT) took a fresh look at its cargo operation and decided to give it increased importance in its strategies, with a view to airfreight achieving a greater percentage of the airline's turnover. It set up CargoSystems to provide
services ranging from third-party handling through warehousing, marketing, on-board courier services and, eventually, a dedicated scheduled freighter operation: a totally new concept for the airline.

For its revamped cargo operations, the airline acquired the old Luqa air passenger terminal, which had become vacant following the move of all passenger-related handling activities to the new Malta International Airport terminal. The building underwent a complete internal refurbishing so that it could meet modern air-cargo requirements. The Air Malta (MLT) CargoSystems and Transhipment Centre was officially inaugurated on 19th January 1994.

MAY 1993: 3 737-3Y5'S (PQ791 - 3), 144Y OR 124 2 CLASS, DELIVERIES.

JUNE 1993: TO TEL AVIV (737-200).

JULY 1993: 737-200 LEASED TO SOELAIR (SBL) UNTIL 1993-09.

JANUARY 1994: LAST 6 MONTHS = +3% PASSENGERS (PAX).

MAY 1994: A310-200, 15C, 178Y, LUFTHANSA (DLH) LEASED UNTIL 1994-09.

JULY 1994: 1ST 6 MONTHS = +25.3% (RPK) TRAFFIC, +20.3% PASSENGERS (PAX), +37.3% (FTK) FREIGHT.

DECEMBER 1994: 2ND RJ-70 (LF507-1F) DELIVERY.

JANUARY 1995: 1994 = +10% (RPK) TRAFFIC, +26.3% PASSENGERS (PAX), +17.8% (FTK) FREIGHT.

JOHN COOK, CHIEF ENGINEER. LOUIS GIORDIMAINA DOING COURSE ON ENGINEERING BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, AT CRANFIELD COLLEGE, UK.

APRIL 1995: 1 737-300 (CFM56-3B2), EX-(COB).

NOVEMBER 1995: JOINT 767-200ER OPERATIONS WITH BALKAN BULGARIAN (BUL), SOFIA, MALTA, NEW YORK (JFK), WEEKLY (10.5 HOURS FLIGHT). NOW 40 DESTINATIONS.

MAY 1996: 1 737-200A (23039), EX-AIR NEW ZEALAND (ANZ), 6 MONTH LEASED. 1 A320-200 (113), AIR ADRIATIC (ADR) WET-LEASED FOR 7 MONTHS.

JULY 1996: REQUESTED DIGITAL VERSIONS OF ILLUSTRATED PARTS CATALOG (IPC) AND TASK CARDS FOR 737-300, AND UNSOPHISTICATED SOFTWARE VERSION FOR 737-200.

JOHN COOK, CHIEF ENGINEER, RESIGNED, AND REPLACED BY LOUIS GIORDIMAINA.

SEPTEMBER 1996: CONTINUING EFFORTS TO ACQUIRE DIGITAL ILLUSTRATED PARTS CATALOG (IPC), TEXT ONLY, NO GRAPHICS, FOR ENGINEERING & PURCHASING.

NOVEMBER 1996: AGREEMENT WITH BALKAN BULGARIA (BUL) TO FLY 767-200ER, LUQA - NEW YORK.

DECEMBER 1996: LOUIS GRECH, CHAIRMAN & CEO, REPLACES JOSEPH TABONE.

MARCH 1997: MALTA FAILS TO MEET (FAA) SAFETY OVERSIGHT STANDARDS (CATEGORY 1), & CANNOT FLY INTO USA UNTIL CORRECTIVE ACTION TAKEN.

MAY 1997: 1,758 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 132 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 189 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

JUNE 1997: 1 737-200 (23035), AIR NEW ZEALAND (ANZ) LEASED AND 1 737-300 (PP774), (JAT) WET-LEASED.

OCTOBER 1997: 737-2Y5 (23039) RETURNED TO AIR NEW ZEALAND (ANZ).

NOVEMBER 1997: IN A PRESS CONFERENCE, CHAIRMAN SAID PLANS TO ACQUIRE +3 TO 4 737-300/-500'S TO REPLACE RJ'S.

JANUARY 1998: POSSIBLE 5 YEAR LEASE OF 4 737-300'S, 2 EX-TRANSBRASIL (TBL), AWAS (AWW) LEASED FOR SUMMER 1998. 1 A320-200, ADRIATIC (ADR) LEASED. PLANS TO ORDER 2 737-600/-700'S & RETIRE ALL A320'S WITHIN 5 YEARS. 1ST OF 4 AVRO RJ70'S TO AZZURRAIR (AZR).

FEBRUARY 1998: 2 ORDERS (1998-03) 737-33A'S (27459; 27460) (AWW) LEASED. ALSO, LEASE FOR +2 737-400'S FOR 737 FLEET TO 9, EX-MALAYSIA AIRLINES (MAS), (27353; 27673), 7 MONTH LEASED WITH OPTION FOR 3 YEARS.

MARCH 1998: 1 737-33A (CFM56-3C1) DELIVERY. 2 737-400'S (CFM56-3C1), EX-MALAYSIA AIRLINES (MAS).

APRIL 1998: 1,770 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 128 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 181 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

(http://www.airmalta.com) (info@airmalta.com.mt). SITA: MLAKOKM.

737-300 DELIVERY (NOW 9 737'S).

NOVEMBER 1998: 737-4H5 (27353), RETURNED TO MALAYSIA AIRLINES (MAS).

DECEMBER 1998: 737-4H6 (27673), RETURNED TO MALAYSIA AIRLINES (MAS).

FEBRUARY 1999: 2 ORDERS (4/99) 737-382'S, (ILF) 3 YEAR LEASED, (24365; 25161), EX-(TAP) PORTUGAL. 1 737-300 (23921), AIR HOLLAND (HOL) LEASED, UNTIL 1999-05.

MARCH 1999: POSSIBLE 3 737-400'S, AIR ONE (ADH) LEASED. 2 737-400'S (27673; 27674), MALAYSIA AIRLINES (MAS) LEASED TO 1999-11.

APRIL 1999: 1,733 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 123 FLIGHT CREW (FC), 239 CABIN ATTENDANTS (CA) & 181 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

SITA: MLAKOKM.

2 737-200 (23847; 23848), CELSIUS AMTEC 5 YEAR LEASED, NORDAM HUSHKITS BY SABENA (SAB) TECHNICS.

MAY 1999: 1 737-400 (27003), EX-AIR ONE (ADH), FLIGHTLEASED 1 YEAR.

JULY 1999: CODE SHARE WITH CZECH AIRLINES (CSA).

737-400 (27004), EX-AIR ONE (ADH), FLIGHTLEASED, SWISSAIR (SWS) NOT TAKEN UP (NTU).

OCTOBER 1999: AIR MALTA MAINTENANCE ENGINEERING: CONTACT: LOUIS GIORDIMAINA, CHIEF ENGINEER: HAS HANGARS FOR 2 NARROW BODIES FOR 737-200/-300'S, & A320'S "A" - "D" MAINTENANCE CHECKS.

NOVEMBER 1999: 1 737-33A (27459), AWAS (AWW) LEASED, SUB-LEASED TO AZZURRA AIR (AZR) TIL 2000-03.

DECEMBER 1999: (FAA) SAFETY OVERSIGHT RECLASSIFIES MALTA FROM CATEGORY 3 TO 1 (OK FOR FLIGHTS TO USA).

FEBRUARY 2000: CODE SHARE WITH (TWA) IN MAY 2000, NEW YORK (JFK) - MILAN & ST LOUIS - LONDON GATWICK (LGW) (767).

1 ORDER (2000-06) 757-200, AMERICAN TRANSAIR (AAT), WET-LEASED, FOR SERVICE TO NEW YORK.

MARCH 2000: (CFM56) ENGINE OVERHAUL CONTRACT, FOR 7 737-300'S & 2 A320'S TO LUFTHANSA TECHNIK (LHT) (DLH).

2 737-7L9'S (28004; 28005), MAERSK (MRS) LEASED TIL OCTOBER 2000.

APRIL 2000: 1,880 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 150 FLIGHT CREW (FC), 250 CABIN ATTENDANTS (CA), & 190 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

737-430 (27003) RETURNED TO FLIGHTLEASE SWISSAIR (SWS), LEASED TO EURALAIR (ERA).

MAY 2000: USA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (DOT) OK'S CODE SHARE WITH (TWA), VIA INTERMEDIATE POINTS, INCLUDING MILAN - NEW YORK (JFK), LONDON - ST LOUIS.

NOVEMBER 2000: 1ST 9 MONTHS = 2.39 BILLION (RPK) TRAFFIC (+1.7%), 15.72 MILLION (FTK) (+55.3%), 1.33 MILLION (PAX) (-4.1%).

1 737-382 (24365) LEASED TO AZZURRA AIR (AZR) UNTIL 2001-03. 2 737-7L9'S (28004; 28005), RETURNED TO MAERSK (MRS).

MARCH 2001: 1 737-5L9 (24778) MAERSK AIR (MRS) LEASED AND 1 A319 (CFM56-5A) (636) LUFTHANSA (DLH), BOTH LEASED TIL NOVEMBER 2001.

APRIL 2001: 1,880 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 150 FLIGHT CREW (FC), 250 CABIN ATTENDANTS (CA), & 190 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

JUNE 2001: CODE SHARE WITH OLYMPIC AIRWAYS (OLY), TO ATHENS, AND TESSALONIKI (737-200/-300).

2ND A319 (700), LUFTHANSA (DLH) LEASED TIL NOVEMBER 2001.

JULY 2001: "C" MAINTENANCE CHECK CONTRACT TO FLS AEROSPACE (ATD), FOR 2 737-300'S.

AUGUST 2001: 1,880 EMPLOYEES. SITA: MLAPRKM.

NOVEMBER 2001: 737-5L9 (24778) RETURNED TO MAERSK UK (MSK).

APRIL 2002: MAIN BASE: MALTA - LUQA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT (MLA).

JUNE 2002: JOINT VENTURE WITH LUFTHANSA TECHNIK (DLH) (LTK), TO FORM LUFTHANSA TECHNIK MALTA, TO DO HEAVY MAINTENANCE ON 737'S & A320'S, AT LUQA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, WITH (LTK) OWNING 51%, & AIR MALTA (MLT) (49%).

July 2002: Switches its Moscow operations from Sheremetyevo to the modernised Domodedovo Airport.

Ernst Funk, ex-VP Strategic Alliances, Swissair (SWS), CEO.

Will sell 2 737-300's (9H-ABR; 9H-ABS; 9H-ABT) and 2 A320's (9H-ABP; 9H-ABQ) to (ILF) and lease back. 7 orders (2003-12) A319-100's (CFM56-5B), 141 PAX, & 5 orders (2003-12) A320-200's (CFM56-5B), 168 PAX, (ILF) 12 year leased.

September 2002: Cooperative agreement with Alitalia (ALI) and will join Skyteam Alliance.

October 2002: Air Malta (MLT) has traded in its RJ70's and RJ85's (operated by Azzurra Air (AZR)) to Airbus, although the airplanes remain in service for the time being.

November 2002: In summer 2003, to Madrid.

Silvio Falzon, Head of Engineering, replaces Louis Giordimaina, who has become the CEO of new Maintenance Repair & Overhaul (MRO) joint venture, Air Malta Lufthansa Technik (LTL).

Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 = +6.6 Million M Pounds/+$15.2 Million: 1.78M passenger (PAX) record!

January 2003: Lufthansa Technik (LTK) (DLH) contract with (MLT) for maintenance of (CFM56-5B's) powering its fleet of 12 A319's/A320's. The Total Engine Support contract extends for 12 years.

In 2003-06, Malta - St Petersburg (weekly). In 2003-07, Malta - Porto (weekly).

737-375 (25614, 9H-ABS) wet-leased to Air New Zealand (ANZ). In summer, will base an A320 in Manchester for wet-leased charter work by Azzurra Air (AZR).

February 2003: In 2003-09, Malta - Helsinki (weekly).

April 2003: 1,912 employees. SITA: MLAKOKM.

(http://www.airmalta.com.mt).

July 2003: 2002 = +$1.55 MILLION (+$2.11 MILLION): 2.75 BILLION (RPK) traffic (-4.2%); -10.3% (ASK) capacity; 71% LF load factor; 1.61 Million passengers (PAX) (-2%); 12.01 Million (FTK) freight (-14.7%).

2002 TOP WORLD AIRLINES TRAFFIC (RPK) (Billion):
144 (DAT) 2.97; 145 (APC) 2.87; 146 (EBA) 2.84; 147 (LDI) 2.82; 148 (SIC) 2.82; 149 (MLT) 2.75; 150 (WLD) 2.69; 151 (ALO) 2.61; 152 (MESABA) 2.59; 153 (AIR WISCONSIN) 2.57; 154 (ADH) 2.54.

August 2003: In its reported financial period (August 2002 – July 2003), Air Malta (MLT) carried 1.6 million passengers on its combined scheduled and charter services.

In November 2003, Malta - St Petersburg.

1 A320-200 (288, 9H-AED), ex-Transair Sweden (TWE)/Goodjet (GJT), (GAX) leased.

September 2003: Italian investment group, Seven, acquired Azzurra Air (AZR) from Air Malta (MLT).

1 order (2004-04)) A319 (ILF) 13.5 years lease.

December 2003: Lawrence Zammit, Chairman, announced that Air Malta (MLT) will launch low-cost, no-frills service branded as "Fare 4U" with thrice weekly 737 summer flights in March 2004, between Valletta & London Stansted (STN). In May 2004, Catania - London Gatwick (3/week).

January 2004: A320-214 (2142), (ILF) leased.

February 2004: Will base 1 A320 in Birmingham and another in Manchester this summer to operate for UK tour operators, replacing Azzurra Air (AZR) operations.

A319-112 (2113, 9H-AEG "Medina"), (ILF) leased.

March 2004: In April 2004, will launch a new no-frills service named "Fare 4U" offering one-way flights from London Stansted (STN) to Malta (3/week).

1,945 employees.

April 2004: A319-112 (2186, 9H-AEJ) & A320-214 (2189, 9H-AEI), (ILF) leased and A320-214 (2178, 9H-AER), GATX (GAX) leased.

May 2004: Bases 2 A320's, 180Y, (GAX) leased in Birmingham & Manchester for charters to Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain. +3 A320's within 3 years and intends to open bases in Sicily and mainland Europe. Air Malta (MLT)'s UK-based Engineering personnel (MT), cabin crew (CA), and flight crew (FC), support the flights.

737-382 (25161) returned to AWAS (AWW).

September 2004: Lufthansa (DLH) Technik (LTK) Malta (LTM), a joint venture between Air Malta (49%) and Lufthansa Technik (DLH) (51%), completed its 100th "C" maintenance check (Spanair (SPP) A320). (LTM) specializes in 737 & A320 family "C" checks, employs 118 employees, nearly all Maltese, and started operations in January 2003.

October 2004: A320-214 (2291, 9H-AEK), (ILF) leased.

November 2004: A319-112 (2332, 9H-AEH), (ILF) leased. B Ae 146-200A (E2306, EI-CNK) sold to Bahrain Defense Force.

December 2004: A320 wet-leased to Vueling Airlines (VUZ).

January 2005: Code share with SN Brussels (DAT), Malta - Brussels (4/week).

A319-111 (2382), (ILF) leased.

March 2005: Selected Sabre Airline Solutions' revenue management application, including Sabre AirMax Revenue Manager, Sabre AirMax Group Manager & Sabre AirMax Low Fares Manager designed for the low-cost carrier market.

July 2005: Ernst Funk, CEO, is to leave Air Malta (MLT) by the end of the year.

October 2005: Air Malta (MLT) and Emirates Airlines (EAD) have signed an agreement by which Air Malta (MLT) will codeshare on (EAD) flights between Malta and Larnaca in Cyprus.

November 2005: Air Malta (MLT) will inaugurate a new route, Malta - Palermo - Naples, on March 27th. The airline will operate 2 flights a week, on Monday/Friday, using an A319.

2 A320-200's wet-leased to Air Atlanta Europe (EUK) for winter season until May 2006.

December 2005: Flughafen Wien, which operates Vienna Airport, has purchased through its VIE Malta subsidiary more than 5% of Malta Airport from the Maltese government. No information was released about the size of the stake. Flughafen Wien already owns 57% of a four-member consortium that controls 40% of Malta Airport.

Air Malta (MLT) announced it will operate domestic Italian service from Rome to Reggio di Calabria starting with the coming summer schedule. The airline will offer 5 flights a week, Monday through Friday.

A319-112 (2113, 9H-AEG), wet-leased to Skyservice (SKB). ILFC (ILF) announced the lease of an A320-200 to Air Malta (MLT) for 12 years. The new airplane is due for delivery in March 2007 and is the 12th A320 family airplane leased to the airline by (ILF).

A320-214 (2665, 9H-AEN), (ILF) leased.

February 2006: Lufthansa (DLH) and Air Malta (MLT) signed a Memo of Understanding (MOU) in Malta to begin a "bilateral cooperation" that will start with the adjustment of their schedules to give passengers of each airline the "opportunity to increase connections to worldwide destinations." Lufthansa (DLH) VP, Joachim Steinbach said (DLH) hopes to integrate Air Malta (MLT) into the new Terminal 2 in Munich. In addition, the two are planning to introduce codeshare flights from November. Air Malta (MLT) offers service to Frankfurt, Munich, Dusseldorf, Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne, while (DLH) has been flying to Malta for more than 20 years.

March 2006: Air Malta (MLT) reported falling revenues through the first nine months of its fiscal year that shifted its operating result -MTL2.3 million/-$6.4 million into the red for the period ended December 31. It reported a +MTL291,000 operating profit for the corresponding period in 2004. Operating revenue decreased -3.2% to MTL81.5 million.

Revenues for the third fiscal quarter dropped -4.7% to MTL19.9 million. Despite a slight -0.8% reduction in costs to MTL24.5 million, operating loss widened to -MTL4.6 million from a -MTL3.8 million deficit in the year-ago quarter. The airline said the lost revenue came from flights to and from Malta and its operations at Malta International Airport, while "tough competition on all fronts" resulted in declining unit revenue. "Other airlines have the luxury of shifting their operations to other non-Malta routes. Although we do have intra-European operations, it is significantly more difficult for us to take this course," CEO, Ernst Funk said.

The number of passengers during the quarter fell -4.6% to 371,000 as capacity increased +2.3% (ASK). Intra-European traffic grew by +10,250 passengers, but passenger traffic on Maltese routes dipped -2.5% (RPK). System load factor dropped -3 points to 64% LF.

A319-112 (2113), returned from First Air (BRS).

April 2006: Air Malta (MLT), announced that COO, Joe Cappello has replaced Ernst Funk as CEO. Cappello joined the airline in 1976 working in market research and rose to become COO in 2002. "Cappello's experience is vast in every area of our business, not least in the critical commercial revenue generation aspect," Air Malta (MLT) Chairman Lawrence Zammit said.

Swissport International signed a comprehensive five-year ground handling agreement with Air Malta (MLT) covering its operations at 23 airports beginning this month.

May 2006: Air Malta (MLT) introduced a voluntary redundancy system "following extensive consultation and negotiations with the four unions representing Air Malta (MLT)'s employees." The option will be available for four months and is open to workers with at least seven years at the airline. Details were released on its website. The deal is part of the 2004 Rescue Plan agreement that the carrier said "has paved the way for a restructuring exercise without the airline engaging itself in forced redundancies."

A320-214 (2768, 9J-AEO), (ILF) leased.

July 2006: Brock Friesen, Chief Officer Commercial, ex-Star Alliance VP Fianance & Strategy,

August 2006: 1,763 employees (including 256 Flight Crew (FC); & 149 Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

September 2006: Air Malta (MLT) will increase the frequency on its Rome Fiumicino to Reggio Calabria from 5 to 10 flights a week on October 29th. The airline will operate 2 flights a day on weekdays using mostly A319s.

Following is the Mondays - Fridays routing and schedule of the airplanes:
Route:
Malta - Reggio - Rome 0625-0715 0745-0845
Rome - Reggio - Rome 0940-1050 1130-1240
Rome - Malta - Rome 1410-1535 1615-1740
Rome - Reggio - Malta 1835-1945 2030-2120

October 2006: 1st 9 months had 1.88 billion (RPK)s passenger traffic (+3.2%), 9.1 million (FTK)S (+.2%); & 1.16 million passengers (+6.2%).

Air Malta (MLT) called the fiscal year ended March 31 "a very difficult one" and said its operating loss increased to -MTL6.4 million/-$18.6 million from -MTL5.7 million in the year-ago period. Revenues fell -2.6% to MTL99.2 million. The airline said its operating result "would have shown a marked improvement" if not for "significant" fuel cost increases. Passenger numbers decreased -2.4% to 1.9 million. It will take delivery of two new A320s in February and March, by which time it will be operating an all-Airbus fleet of 14 airplanes.

Air Malta (MLT) will launch twice-weekly service on Mondays with an A319 & Fridays with a 737-300, to Liverpool and Venice on May 4.

November 2006: Lufthansa (DLH) is expanding its presence in Malta. First, Lufthansa Technik (LTK) will set up new Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul (MRO) capabilities for "C" and "D" checks on the A330 and A340 families. Under terms of a Memo of Understanding (MOU) signed by the Maltese government and (LTK) Malta, a joint venture with Air Malta (MLT), a hangar will be constructed by Malta Industrial Parks and leased to (LTK). Pending approval of a new labor agreement with local trade unions, the facility is due to be up and running as early as 2008.

"We must ensure that we have sufficient resources across our global network to meet the expected increase in demand for widebody maintenance and overhaul services for A330s and A340s in the coming years," (LTK) CEO, Product & Services, Thomas Stuger said. (LTK) Malta was founded in 2002 and currently has 150 employees. A Center of Excellence within the Lufthansa Technik (LTK) Group, it focuses on "C" checks on short-range Boeing and Airbus airplanes.

Meanwhile, Lufthansa (DLH) and Air Malta (MLT) will operate code share flights on several routes and recognize each other's loyalty programs. All 21 weekly flights between Malta and Frankfurt and Munich will be operated on a code share basis with immediate effect. A source close to the cooperation said that Air Malta (MLT) could be the next Star Alliance Regional member.

January 2007: The European Commission (EC) allowed Malta to offer startup aid totaling MTL25 million/$75.1 million for new air routes from Malta International Airport until September 2011. The (EC) stipulated that aid will be limited to five years for each new service and to 40% of startup costs.

A320-214 (2142, 9H-AEF), wet-leased to Sky Airline (SSV).

February 2007: Starting July 12th, new 1/week Malta - Cluj, using 737-300s.

1 A320-211 (350), ex-Air Canada (ACN), Lat Charter (LAJ) leased.

March 2007: 2 A320-214s (3056, 0H-AEP; 3068, 9H-AEQ), deliveries.

May 2007: Starts Malta - Liverpool, using 737s/A319s, - Venice, using 737s/A320s. Starting July 12th, Malta - Cluj, using 737-300s.

July 2007: Lufthansa Technik (DLH) (LTK) started construction on a 27,000-sq-m maintenance hangar for A330s and A340 in Malta. (LTK) will invest €55 million/$74.9 million and said the project will create about +540 jobs. The facility should be operational by the 2008 fourth quarter and will be leased to Lufthansa Technik (LTK) Malta, in which Lufthansa (DLH) will hold 92% and Air Malta (MLT) the remainder. (DLH) said the expansion is required to meet rising demand for Maintenance Repair & Overhaul (MRO) on the Airbus (EDS) widebodies. (LTK) also operates an A330/A340 facility in Manila. Meanwhile, (LTK) Malta will continue to perform maintenance and checks on A320s and 737s. The company was founded in 2002 and has completed 202 "C" checks on narrowbody airplanes.

September 2007: Air Malta (MLT) is wet-leasing two A320s to Etihad Airways (EHD) and providing operational support on a third for the winter schedule from September 1.

November 2007: 1st 6 months = 769.9 million (RPK)s (-5.1%) traffic; 3.2 million (FTK)s (-34.7%) freight traffic; 484,000 (-2.7%) passengers.

January 2008: 2007 statistics: 2.23 billion (RPK)s passenger traffic -6%; -4.5% capacity (ASK)s; -1.1 load factor for 67.6% LF. SEE ATTACHED COMPARISON CHART TO SELECTED OPERATORS - "MLT-2007-STATS."

February 2008: Air Malta (MLT) signed a three-year labor agreement with the Air Line Pilots Assn-Malta retroactive to August 1, 2007. Air Malta (MLT) said pay increases are weighted toward the end of the contract "in line with the airline's requirement to continue its financial recovery."

April 2008: Air Malta (MLT) disposed of its final Boeing airplane, a 737-300, following a flight to Frankfurt on March 30. In summer 2002, it struck a fleet renewal deal with Airbus (EDS) and (ILFC) (ILF) under which it agreed to lease 12 new A320s, that were delivered in January 2004 through March 2007.

August 2008: Singapore and Malta reached an "open skies" agreement effective December 1, 2010.

September 2008: Air Malta (MLT) as the national flag carrier, operates to around 50 destinations in Europe, North Africa, and the Eastern Mediterranean, with 200 flights a week.

Employees = 1,800 - (MLT) does not have any vacancies at the present time).

(IATA) Code: KM - 643. (ICAO) Code: AMC (Callsign - AIR MALTA).

Parent organization/shareholders: Maltese government (98%); & private companies (2%).

Owns: Medavia (25%).

Alliances: Aeroflot Russian Airlines (ARO); Czech Airlines (CSA); Libyan Arab Airlines (LAA); Olympic Airlines (OLY); Qantas Airways (QAN); & SN Brussels Airlines (DAT)/(EBA).

Main Base: Malta Luqa International Airport (MLA).

Hubs: Birmigham International Airport (BHM); & Bristol International Airport (BRS).

International, Scheduled Destinations: Amsterdam; Athens; Barcelona; Berlin; Birmingham; Bologna; Bristol; Brussels; Bucharest; Budapest; Cairo; Casablanca; Catania; Dublin; Dusseldorf; Frankfurt; Geneva; Glasgow; Hamburg; Istanbul; Larnaca; Leipzig; London Gatwick; London Heathrow; London Stansted; Lyon; Madrid; Manchester; Marseille; Milan; Moscow; Munich; Nantes; Newcastle; Nottingham; Oslo; Palermo; Paris; Prague; Reggio Calabria; Rome; Sofia; Stockholm; Toulouse; Tripoli; Tunis; Venice; Vienna; & Zurich.

Lufthansa Technik (LTK) is expanding capacity in European countries with lower labor costs and plans to perform its first "D" check on an A321 at its new Sofia facility in November. (LTK) Sofia will open formally on October 28, employ 258, and feature a two-bay, 6,000-sq-m hangar. (LTK) has invested €20 million in the facility along with partner Bulgarian Aviation Group. Sofia will join (LTk) sites in Germany, Ireland, Hungary, and Malta in performing single-aisle Maintenance Repair & Overhaul (MRO).

Meanhile, (LTK) Malta (LTL) is planning to open its new 27,000-sq-m hangar early next year to accommodate A330s and A340s in addition to narrowbody airplanes. The joint venture between (LTK) (51%) and Air Malta (MLT) (49%) will increase the number of employees to 274 from the present 150, and eventually to approximately 700.

June 2009: Air Malta (MLT) is enjoying a reasonably stable ride through the current industry crisis thanks to decisions made several years ago, but it remains weighed down by excess staff, CEO, Joe Cappello said. "Thanks to increased efficiency and productivity, today our cost base is significantly lower than what it was six years ago. Had these changes not been implemented, (MLT) would not have had a fighting chance to survive in the turbulent aviation business, especially in these last couple of years," he said.

In 2003, (MLT) already was anticipating shifts in passenger demand patterns and began a wide-ranging restructuring process that has changed drastically the way it operates. It invested heavily in revenue management projects on both the technological and human resources sides. "We have changed the way we do business, especially how we sell our seats," Cappello said.

Around the same time, (MLT) negotiated a rescue plan with the four unions that represent its employees that has allowed it to shed more than -€30 million in costs since then. "We have reduced our staff members by -21% over the past five years and we are operating more flights in the meantime. However, there are still pockets of over-staffing which need to be addressed," he said. He added that the problem can be tackled in part through agreements with unions that will provide for greater operational flexibility. "We don't need as much staff in winter as we do in summer. This is what we currently are discussing with the unions representing (MLT)'s employees," he explained.

(MLT)'s 2008 accounts have not been finalized, although it expects the fall of the British pound to cost it more than >€10 million/$14.1 million - - its principal market is the UK - - while very little of a +€30 million increase in fuel costs has been passed on in fares. There will be an impact on the bottom line, although (MLT)'s performance over the winter was about level with last year's, Cappello said.

This summer it will launch service to Verona and Stuttgart, operating 15 additional weekly flights and increasing capacity by more than >50,000 seats. Some 60% of the current schedule is flown under code share.

December 2009: Air Malta (MLT) and Meridiana (ALS)have entered into a code share arrangement on flights between Malta and Catania, Italy. (ALS) will offer services from Reggio Calabria to Olbia and Cagliari, via a stopover in Rome. The link from Reggio to Rome will be flown by (MLT), while the onward connection will be operated by (ALS).

February 2010: Air Malta (MLT) is adding new routes to Italy next summer:
Catania - Frankfurt: 4x weekly A319-100/A320-200 service starting on April 3;
Malta - Naples: 2x weekly seasonal A319-100/A320-200 service starting on June 6;
Malta - Reggio di Calabria - Genoa: 2x weekly seasonal A319-100 service starting on May 8;
Malta - Turin: 2x weekly A320-200 service starting on May 21.

Sabre Airline Solutions reached an agreement with Air Malta (MLT) to provide its AirCentre Flight Plan Manager solution.

August 2010: Air Malta (MLT) has announced plans for a new restructuring plan with additional capital being provided by the Maltese government to ensure its long-term viability as an independent carrier. It has again increased its number of destinations served from Malta:
Malta - Damascus: 3x weekly seasonal, A319-100 service between June 7 and September 30;
Malta - Milan Linate: 2x weekly, A319-100 service starting on October 31 (in addition to five weekly flights to Malpensa).

Air Malta (MLT) has, however, terminated its Catania - London Gatwick flights at the end of March.

October 2010: Etihad Airways (EHD) and Air Malta (MLT) signed a code share agreement under which (EAD)'s code will be placed on Air Malta (MLT)'s Milan Malpensa (MXP) – Malta flights and (MLT)'s code will be placed on (EHD)'s (MXP) – Abu Dhabi flights.

November 2010: The European Commission (EC) approved a €52 million/$71 million loan from the Maltese government to Air Malta (MLT) to keep (MLT) afloat, while it works on its restructuring plan.

The temporary state aid is in line with (EU) regulations, competition authorities said. (EC) VP Competition, Joaquin Almunia explained that it is intended to “avoid a sudden disappearance of (MLT), which would lead to serious disturbances in the Maltese economy.”

(MLT) has six months to present its restructuring plan. (MLT) operates 12 A319-320s and carries less than <1% of intra-European air traffic passengers. (MLT) is heavily dependent on tourism.

January 2011: A320-214 (2665, 9H-AEN), wet-leased to Sky Airline (SSV) until March.

June 2011: Air Malta (MLT) confirmed details of a long-awaited restructuring plan, which it said is needed to “to save the airline and hundreds of jobs.” However, as airline officials remained vague on the plan, details leaked to a national newspaper disclosed that almost 40% of (MLT)’s workforce, or -500 jobs, will be cut.

(MLT)’s long-time struggle for survival prompted the European Commission (EC) in November to authorize a €52 million/$74.4 million short-term loan facility from the government to alleviate (MLT)’s liquidity problems. The (EC) approved the state aid on a temporary basis until it could take a position on the restructuring plan to be submitted by Malta within a maximum of six months. The plan, the (EC) argued, must guarantee “future viability of the services currently provided by Air Malta (MLT); otherwise, (MLT) will have to reimburse the loan or undergo liquidation.” Despite self-imposed deadlines of January and then February, the final rescue plan (prepared by Ernst & Young) was submitted to the European authorities May 15.

In an address to employees, management remained quite vague about the restructuring plan and said only it aims to cut costs by -€30 million annually while at the same time increasing revenue by +€30 million annually. However, details of the restructuring plan were leaked to a national newspaper, which disclosed that more than >500 jobs (almost 40% of (MLT)’s workforce) will be cut. The document also states the Maltese government will have to provide an additional €25 million to recapitalize (MLT), whereas (MLT) must raise €51 million in bank loans or bonds.

According to CEO, Peter Davies, who was appointed at the end of March, (MLT) posted a -€36 million loss in the last financial year ended March 2011. Deficit in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 - 2010 amounted to €31 million.

The Ernst & Young restructuring plan outlines a target fleet of 10 airplanes some 800 employees, down from 1,300, resulting in the layoff of -57 pilots (FC), -53 cabin crew (CA), -21 engineers (MT), -190 ground workers (MT) and -190 administrative personnel. The workforce reduction would bring savings of between -€12 million and -€15 million. It suggests (MLT) restructure its network and abandon routes with low profitability and high competition such as Birmingham, Palermo, Tunis, and Turin. It also recommends revenue-generating measures, including charging baggage fees for every piece of luggage, removing discounts for children and introducing a credit card fee for bookings.

The Ernst & Young report describes the recent agreement with ILFC (ILF), Airbus (EDS) and (CFM) International to renew the (MLT) fleet with 12 new A320 family airplanes for a term of 12 years each, as “a very poor decision.” It criticizes (MLT)’s senior management team, concluding that it was “not proactive in reacting to the significant change in operating environment and this has been a key reason for the poor performance and (MLT)’s current fight for survival.”

Management declined to publicly confirm the leaked figures, explaining they refer to an earlier draft of the plan and not the finalized version sent to the (EC). The country’s pilots (FC) union, (ALPA)-Malta, however, is taking the figures seriously and issued a statement in which it “expressed surprise at (MLT)’s decision to reduce the pilot (FC) workforce by one-third.” It has threatened industrial action as of July 15.

Davies also announced the appointment of Philip Saunders as CCO. Davies and Saunders worked together at (BWIA)/Caribbean Airlines (TTA) and SN Brussels Airlines (DAT).

November 2011: Air Malta (MLT) has named Chief Flight Operations Officer, Captain Lawrence Gatt to the new role of Chief Officer for Strategic Fleet Review.

December 2011: Air Malta (MLT) as the national flag carrier, operates to around 50 destinations in Europe, North Africa, and the Eastern Mediterranean.

Employees = 1,547.

(IATA) Code: KM - 643. (ICAO) Code: AMC - (Callsign - AIR MALTA).

Parent organization/shareholders: Maltese government (98%); & private companies (2%).

Owns: Medavia (25%).

Alliances: Aeroflot Russian Airlines (ARO); Austrian Airlines (AUL); British Midland International (BMA); Brussels Airlines (DAT)/(EBA); (CSA) Czech Airlines; Emirates (EAD); Etihad Airways (EHD); Lufthansa (DLH); Meridiana Fly (ALS); Swiss International Airlines (CSR); and Turkish Airlines (THY).

Main Base: Malta Luqa International Airport (MLA).

Hubs: Birmigham International Airport (BHM); & Bristol International Airport (BRS).

International, Scheduled Destinations: Amsterdam; Athens; Barcelona; Berlin; Birmingham; Bologna; Bristol; Brussels; Bucharest; Budapest; Cairo; Casablanca; Catania; Dublin; Dusseldorf; Frankfurt; Geneva; Glasgow; Hamburg; Istanbul; Larnaca; Leipzig; London Gatwick; London Heathrow; London Stansted; Lyon; Madrid; Manchester; Marseille; Milan; Moscow; Munich; Nantes; Newcastle; Nottingham; Oslo; Palermo; Paris; Prague; Reggio Calabria; Rome; Sofia; Stockholm; Toulouse; Tripoli; Tunis; Venice; Vienna; & Zurich.

January 2012: Air Malta (MLT) has resumed four times weekly, A319-100/A320-200 service from Malta to Tripoli International on November 28 and is considering adding Benghazi to its network at a later stage. It has dropped its routes from Reggio di Calabria to Genoa, Malta, and Rome Fiumicino.

February 2012: Lufthansa Technik Malta is carrying out its third installation of a Lufthansa (DLH) first-class (F) cabin in an A340-600. The project includes installing new seats as well as a new in-flight entertainment system. (DLH)'s fleet of 24 A340-600s is scheduled for conversion by 2015.

March 2012: Air Malta (MLT) will launch weekly charter flights to and from Birmingham beginning May 1 until the end of October.

April 2012: Air Malta (MLT) is touting Valetta as a candidate for the European "Capital of Culture" in 2018 with an A320-214 (9H-AEO) painted with decals depicting the skyline of the Maltese capital.

Over the past six years, (MLT) has lost -Euro 116 million/-$155 million, and is seeking European Commission (EC) consent for a state injection of Euro 130 million/$173 million. Essentially a life line to the small island, (MLT) is the only European airline that can also fly to non-(EU) destinations such as Egypt, Libya, and Tunisia.

May 2012: Air Malta (MLT) is to resume services to the Libyan city of Benghazi next month, operating twice-weekly on the route.

(MLT) is already operating daily to the Libyan capital, Tripoli, and the Benghazi flights will supplement this service. "The decision to operate to Benghazi was taken following a positive report received from (MLT)'s technical team that audited this airport on various aspects."

June 2012: The European Commission (EC) has given the Maltese government the go-ahead to provide €130 million/$162.3 million in state aid for restructuring national carrier Air Malta (MLT).

Following what it describes as “an in-depth investigation,” the (EC) concluded that “the restructuring plan adequately addresses the financial problems of Air Malta (MLT),” and the government’s financial intervention was “in line with (EU) state aid rules.”

The (EC) said: “The restructuring measures foreseen, which include a significant capacity reduction and the sale of assets, should ensure long-term viability without continued state support, whilst avoiding undue distortions of competition.”

In November 2010, the (EC) authorized a loan facility of €52 million for (MLT) as rescue aid, subject to the submission by the Maltese authorities of a restructuring plan within six months. In May 2011, Malta notified the (EC) that the plan would need a €130 million capital increase, triggering alarms that it might not comply with the 2004 (EU) Rescue & Restructuring Guidelines. As a result, the (EC) launched its investigation in January this year.

It found that the restructuring plan was “based on realistic assumptions and should enable Air Malta (MLT) to become viable within a reasonable timescale.” The (EC) said the proposed withdrawal from certain routes would not create “undue distortions of competition.” (MLT) will also sell land and other assets, as well as securing a private bank loan, to contribute to the costs of restructuring.

The (EC) also found that a previous capital injection in 2004 was carried out on market terms and therefore did not constitute state aid in the meaning of (EU) rules.

(MLT) Chairman, Louis Farrugia said the ruling meant (MLT) “can continue to trade in the knowledge that its balance sheet can be strengthened and investment in human resources (HR) and its operations can take place whilst (MLT) turns from its current loss-making position into a profitable trading one.”

However, (CEO), Peter Davies cautioned the approval was subject to the continued monitoring and review of performance by the (EU). “The (EC) expects strict adherence to the commitments stated in the [restructuring] plan. We have still a lot of work to deliver to remain on the right track,” he said.

August 2012: Air Malta (KM) has reported a slightly reduced operating loss of -€30 million/-$37 million for its year ended March 31, improved over a -€34 million loss for the previous year.

(MLT) said that two factors impacted its performance and that its operating loss excluding these, would have been -€21 million. The first was a -20% reduction in capacity (-10% in 2011 and a further -10% in 2012) required by the European Commission (EC) for (MLT) to receive state aid from the Maltese government. The capacity reduction is part of a restructuring plan approved by the (EC), which translated into an estimated reduction in profitability during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 of -€4 million.

The second was fuel prices, which increased +30% during the year, adding +€17 million to the (FY) 2012 fuel bill.

(MLT) said that it was starting to see improvements as a result of the restructuring efforts, despite the adverse economic conditions across Europe.

(FY) 2012 operating revenues increased +€7million to €214 million, and despite the capacity reduction, (MLT) increased revenues through a number of commercial initiatives that included improved yields (€105 per passenger in (FY) 2012 compared to €100 per passenger in FY2011), a +2% improvement in load factor from 73.2% LF in (FY) 2011 to 75.2% LF in (FY) 2012, and a number of ancillary revenue initiatives that together have generated a gross revenue improvement of more than >€20 million.

Restructuring plan benefits including reduced personnel costs began to feed through in the second half of the financial year. Early and voluntary retirement schemes brought the number of full-time employees down from 1,249 to 1,026 during the financial year, and (MLT) expects that number to come down to 923 in the financial year ending March 2013. (MLT) also benefited from a waiver of all Malta landing fees for all airlines during the winter.

Passenger numbers for (FY) 2012 were slightly down, at 1.76 million passengers compared to 1.82 million the previous year.

(MLT) said that, during the next financial year, restructuring plan initiatives are expected to enable it to halve this year's loss to -€15 million.

Air Malta (MLT) has rebranded and will be named "Malta – The Airline of the Maltese Islands." The marketing move is intended to shift focus from the airline to its destinations, the "Malta Independent" reported.

(MLT) Chairman, Louis Farrugia said (MLT), which posted a 2011 loss of -€88.9 million/-$110.2 million, should return to profitability by 2015. It received a capital injection of €130 million from the Maltese government in June. (MLT) has been undergoing a restructuring process and operates five A319s and seven A320s.

SEE ATTACHED - - "MLT-2012-08 - NEW LIVERY." IT IS PART OF A REBRANDING CAMPAIGN THAT FOCUSES ON THE HERITAGE AND CULTURE OF THE MALTESE ISLANDS.

September 2012: Air Malta (MLT) has sold its tour operator Holiday Malta active in the United Kingdom to Maltese conglomerate, the (SMS) Group. The new owner of Holiday Malta has already previously been active in the Incoming Tourism industry in Malta besides shipping, logistics and insurance. Air Malta (MLT) currently operates to London Gatwick (LGW), London Heathrow (LHR) and Manchester Ringway International (MAN) on a scheduled basis, while also offering scheduled charter flights to Birmingham International (BHX), Bristol International (BRS), Cardiff International (CWL), Exeter International (EXT), Newcastle (NCL) and Norwich (NWI). The two companies are expected to continue their cooperation regardless.

November 2012: Air Malta (MLT) will operate seasonal winter service to Amsterdam, Athens, Benghazi, Berlin, Brussels, Catania, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Istanbul, London (Gatwick and Heathrow), Manchester, Milan, Moscow, Munich, Paris (Charles de Gaulle and Orly), Rome, Sofia, Tripoli, Vienna, and Zurich up until March 2013.

January 2013: Air Malta (MLT) has posted a third-quarter net loss of -€8.5 million/-$11.4 million, narrowed from a loss of -€11.9 million in the year-ago quarter. (MLT)’s third quarter ended December 31, 2012.

Air Malta (MLT), which is going through a major restructuring process, said that many of the restructuring costs were one-off charges. It reduced its third-quarter operating loss to -€4.8 million, less than half the -€9.8 million loss in the year-ago period.

(MLT) said it was on track to cut in half last year’s -€30 million operating loss. It said the results were driven by improvements in (MLT)’s revenue (up +9.7% to €47.7 million), passenger numbers (up +3.5% to 377,951) and load factor (up +1% to 75.1% LF).

“Despite this being a lean period of the year, these results continue to confirm that (MLT) is on its way to recovery,” (CEO), Peter Davies said. “We are substantially on track in our revenue targets, but much more needs to be done to reduce supplier costs.” Challenges facing (MLT) remain “significant,” he said.

In June 2012, the European Commission (EC) approved €130 million in state aid for restructuring (MLT), the Maltese national carrier. It re-branded in August.

“Our stronger financial platform now allows the company to enter into its second phase of development, which includes a significant overhaul of business processes in our finance, cabin and ground services divisions. This is aimed at developing a more customer-centric experience that will require the vital and responsible role of our employee unions as well as a change in management structure, which will be announced next week,” Davies said.

Air Malta (MLT) is facing an industrial dispute with its pilots (FC), represented by the Airline Pilots Association (ALPA), over the company’s new training facilities.

(ALPA), which registered the dispute soon after Air Malta (MLT) inaugurated its new head office in the SkyParks Business Center, claims “the new training facilities situated in (MLT)’s new offices are not up to standard.” (ALPA) said: “What (MLT) has conveniently not mentioned is that these training rooms are located at SkyParks’ Level 0, which effectively is situated below ground level. These rooms are completely bereft of any natural ventilation or window. Since crews (FC) will be required to spend up to seven hours daily in these rooms during courses, (ALPA) has requested that an Air Quality Report be carried out to assess the air quality in these rooms.”

(ALPA) said that in the absence of a satisfactory air quality report, it has instructed members not to attend training in these rooms. (MLT) said it could not understand the motivation behind the union executive committee’s actions “especially since in the past months, certain members of this committee embarked on a campaign stating that not enough was being done by the company to reduce costs.”

(MLT) went on to say: “The shallowness of arguments continues to reflect a superficial view of the real issues affecting (MLT) and the need to start work constructively together with management to face the challenges ahead. It is mind-boggling how certain (ALPA) executive committee members continue to raise issues and object to every positive change the company implements to restructure itself.”

(MLT) insists that the SkyParks building is Malta’s first Grade “A” office park and has achieved a Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) certification, which sets the standard for best practice in sustainable building design.

(MLT) said it had challenged the union executive committee’s claims and invited (ALPA) “to provide proof to support its claims.”

February 2013: Air Malta (MLT) will reorganize its senior management structure in a bid to move (MLT) into the second stage of its restructuring plan.

(CEO), Peter Davies said the first phase of restructuring has begun to show results, but he stressed: “While we have achieved some
significant milestones we are still not out of the woods. Much has still to be improved as we continue down the vital path of profitability without which we cannot survive.” He said that, thanks to the first phase of restructuring, (MLT) was now focused on delivering profits and securing an improved balance and cash flow.

The next phase, he said, would target self-sufficiency and profitability, and included a change in Air Malta (MLT)’s senior management structure. “The first phase is complete; this second phase is about strengthening our efforts,” Davies said. “We need to consolidate the gains we have achieved and begin to map out our future. We need to have a vision, a strategy that takes this airline forward, forward beyond what is currently envisaged in the restructuring plan, beyond 2016. Those strategies are now being developed.”

April 2013: Air Malta (MLT) (CEO), Peter Davies has been appointed to (IATA)’s board of governors, a first for the airline.

May 2013: Air Malta (MLT) is on course to achieve break-even this year after restructuring efforts helped it narrow losses in the year to 30 March 2013 to around -€15 million/-$19.5 million.

The airline has undergone a restructuring under the guidance of (CEO), Peter Davies, who joined the loss-making airline in 2011. In parallel with the reorganization, new company-wide branding, including a new image, was unveiled last year.

Davies says the five-year restructuring plan (agreed as part of the conditions of the EU's approval for a bail-out) called for losses at an operational level to be reduced to €15 million in its fiscal year to 30 March 2013. The state-owned airline reported an operational loss of -€30 million in the ­previous year.

"We're going to come in close to -€15 million [loss] if not slightly better, so at an operational level we're dead on target for the restructuring plan," he says. "This year we've got to break even." Davies adds that revenue for the last fiscal year was €218 million, up from €209 million in 2010 - 2011.

The conditions of Brussels' rescue-aid approval in June last year required that Air Malta (MLT) give up certain routes, which has accounted for a -20% reduction in its available seat kilometers (ASKs) over the last two years.

As a result of the downsizing, (MLT) reduced headcount by a third to around 900 full-time staff and cut its fleet by two airplanes. It now operates 10 Airbus narrow bodies: five A319s and five A320s.

With capacity cut, Davies has focused on increasing (MLT)'s seat factor and yield, as well as on reworking its pricing structure.
"We've increased the number of booking classes, done away with the old fare rules and now manage the business by inventory and not by price," he says.

Davies adds that 20% of the restructuring is about "rewiring and replumbing the airline" and the other 80% is about bringing a cultural revolution. He says there are two stages to the restructuring strategy, the first being to tackle "low-hanging fruit" such as introducing a better approach to fuel-hedging. When Davies joined, he revamped (MLT)'s "fairly poor fuel-hedging policy", which had seen it paying +30% more for its fuel than the competition.

The second stage is to focus on "nickels and dimes", he says. "We're not a British Airways (BAB), Lufthansa (DLH), or AirFrance (AFA), but all the complex systems we had in place meant that Air Malta (MLT) felt that it was," he says. "We've realigned ourselves for our purpose in life, which, as a destination airline, is to bring as many people to Malta as possible."

Last year's rebranding was about changing the outside perception of the airline as well as helping to bring about a cultural revolution within it, he adds.

The drive to increase seat factor has seen a double-digit percentage rise in passenger numbers from 1.5 million to just under 1.7 million in 2012 - 2013. Next year, it should rise slightly, to around 1.72 million. "What's good about it is we've increased both seat factor and yield," he says.

Looking ahead, "it is a question of looking for volume and playing the classic seat-load-factor elasticity game, along with further cost reductions", says Davies.

The Brussels (ASK) restrictions apply within the (EU), so Air Malta (MLT) is looking to expand its operations to points outside the union, such as in Russia. "We're hoping to launch Algiers soon, largely for the transfer traffic to Europe," he adds. (MLT) begins 2X-weekly, Malta - Algiers service on June 17.

The conditions of the bail-out mean that once the airline "is back in profit and can prove sustainability, we can go back to the (EU) and have conversations about changing the (ASK)s", ­Davies says.

As regards the possibility of outside investment, Davies says that is up to the government, as the shareholder.

"The new Maltese government is conscious of the fact that we have a restructuring plan for five years and at some point it will require equity, and it is a question of how they furnish that. We will come up with some proposals.

"My preferred option is to look for strategic partners. Given Malta's geographic location, there is a unique opportunity as a regional centre serving sub-Saharan Africa and connections to the Middle East," he says.

There is no immediate requirement to replace the Airbus (EDS) fleet as the airplanes do not begin to return off lease until 2016, but the airline is beginning to think about replacements. "We've just kicked off a network review - you have to establish what network you're looking at first, rather than the other way around," Davies says.

July 2013: Air Malta (MLT) begins 2X-weekly, Malta - Algiers service.

September 2013: Jeppesen, a part of Boeing (TBC) Digital Aviation, and Air Malta (MLT) recently agreed to a three-year charting, NavData and electronic flight bag (EFB) service contract. A long-standing Jeppesen customer, (MLT) will integrate Jeppesen FliteDeck Pro on iPad to streamline access to essential flight information and Jeppesen’s industry-leading navigation data.

Air Malta (MLT), the national air carrier of Malta, is in the process of eliminating paper-based materials from their operation and Jeppesen FliteDeck Pro on iPad will help the airline fully transition to digital flight information. The iPad-based solution also helps to reduce pilot (FC) workload, increase situational awareness in flight and lower operating costs through reduced fuel consumption, based on weight savings.

“Integrating Jeppesen FliteDeck Pro on iPad is essential for our operations as we continue our process to achieve a fully digital flight information working environment,” said Mark Attard, Technical Pilot, (MLT). “With automatic updates of essential data and intuitive functionality, FliteDeck Pro provides us with the foundation needed for improved fleet-wide operational efficiency.”

Jeppesen FliteDeck Pro on iPad will provide Air Malta (MLT) with vector-based terminal charts and data-driven enroute content, which is dynamically rendered on-screen for improved situational awareness in the flight deck. Jeppesen NavData is developed from a comprehensive aviation database, which is composed of more than one million records and is continuously updated from global aviation data sources during each 28-day revision cycle.

“In a marketplace where reduced costs and increased efficiency are vital to success, Jeppesen FliteDeck Pro will help (MLT) achieve their goal of establishing a paperless operating environment,” said Tim Huegel, Director, Jeppesen Aviation Portfolio Management. “Air Malta (MLT) pilots (FC) will be able to focus on other essential Flight Operations, as FliteDeck Pro provides flight information that is ready to use, without time consuming hand revisions of paper charts and operational data.”

October 2013: Lufthansa Technik Malta, a subsidiary of Lufthansa Technik (DLH) (LTK), is expanding its hangar capacity for maintenance and overhaul work on Airbus wide body airplanes.

With the addition of the smallest of the three hangars in Malta, which has been used to date only for narrow body airplanes, the building will be able to accommodate airplanes up to the size of an Airbus A330 or A340.

Engineers and mechanics (MT) can work on up to three wide body airplanes simultaneously and the company can meet the growing demand for technical services from the Airbus A330/A340 family with more flexibility, the company said.

Lufthansa Technik Malta has around 600 employees and more than >60,000 sq m of hangar space at Malta International Airport. In addition to maintenance and overhaul work, its spectrum of services includes structural repairs, composite material repairs, airplane painting and complex cabin modifications.

Lufthansa Technik Malta started operations 10 years ago and has performed over 865 checks and modifications on airplanes for customers around the world. In 2012, it provided 750,000 hours of work for Lufthansa Technik (DLH) (LTK) and expects a record-breaking workload for next year.

November 2013: Air Malta (MLT) said it has ended the second year of its five-year restructuring plan with reduced losses, but cautioned that more work is needed to improve further its financial situation.

(MLT) has appointed Louis Giordimaina as its new (CEO), effective January 1, 2014. The new (CEO) will replace outgoing (CEO), Peter Davies, who has overseen a restructuring program to reform the struggling national carrier from recent profit losses. When Peter Davies joined Air Malta (MLT) in March 2011, (MLT) was technically insolvent and in dire need of a rescue loan, which the European Commission (EC) had just approved. Drawing on his experience as (CEO) of UK regional, Air Southwest, Caribbean Airlines (TTA) and SN Brussels Airlines (DAT)/(EBA), Davies made significant headway in narrowing Air Malta (MLT)’s losses.

Giordimaina is the former Chief Engineer for Air Malta (MLT) and first joined (MLT) in 1975. He helped establish a joint venture (JV) between Lufthansa Technik (DLH) (LTK) and Air Malta (MLT), to create Lufthansa Technik Malta, and served as the (CEO) of that joint venture until 2011, when he became Director until September 2013.

January 2014: Air Malta (MLT) relaunches 2x-weekly, summer Malta - Algiers service.

February 2014: AirFrance (AFA) and Air Malta (MLT) signed a code share agreement starting March 30. (AFA) will place it code on Air Malta (MLT) Airbus A319/A320 18x-weekly services from Malta to Paris Charles de Gaulle and Orly, plus Malta - Lyon.

Air Malta ((IATA) Code: KM, (ICAO) Code: AMC) (MLT) currently serves 17 countries, 42 destinations and 44 routes. (MLT) is based at Malta Luqa International airport (MLA).

May 2014: Air Malta (MLT) has inaugurated flights to Istanbul’s Sabiha Gökçen Airport after moving from Istanbul Atatürk Airport with 3x-weekly service.

(MLT) has appointed Manuel Agius as Chief Cargo Officer, effective May 19th. Agius joined (MLT) in 1973 and has held various positions, including Group Head Cargo & Flight Services, & Chief Operator Operations.

Air Malta (MLT) has signed an agreement to lease out an Airbus A320 airplane to Monarch Airlines (MON) for 19 months, which commenced at the end of April and will run through November 2015.

June 2014: Air Malta (MLT) has renewed its (IATA) Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) registration following a comprehensive audit carried out by a foreign (IATA)-approved audit organization. (IOSA) is an internationally recognised evaluation system designed to assess the operational management and control systems of an airline.

The audit covers all the airline's operational departments namely: Organization & Management System, Flight Operations, Operational Control & Flight Dispatch, Aircraft Engineering & Maintenance, Cabin Operations, Ground Handling Operations, Cargo Operations and Security Management. Each department is audited for the required documented policy and procedures, as well as the correct implementation.

(IOSA) is consequently the benchmark for global safety management in airlines. All (IATA) members are registered and must remain registered in order to maintain (IATA) membership.

July 2014: Air Malta (MLT) is swapping out its paper-based flight manuals for Electronic Flight Bags (EFBs). The national carrier of Malta recently received authorization to begin flying with the Jeppesen FliteDeck Pro iPad (EFB). (MLT) is looking to use the switch to (EFB)s to reduce its fuel consumption and receive vector-based terminal charts for data-driven enroute content, Jeppesen said.

"Jeppesen and FliteDeck Pro on iPad have provided the base for us to receive this authorization and achieve one of the first fully digital airline operations in Europe,” said Captain Patrick Calleja, Head of Aircraft Operations, Air Malta (MLT). “It has been our goal to become a paperless airline and we look forward to continued operational benefits and improved efficiency using FliteDeck Pro as our (EFB) platform."

(MLT) is looking to introduce the iPad (EFB)s across its entire fleet of Airbus A320 family airplanes.

August 2014: Air Malta (MLT) expanded its seasonal offering with the launch of a new route from its Malta (MLA) hub to Djerba (DJE) in Tunisia on August 7th. The 407 km sector to the largest island of North Africa, located in the Gulf of Gabes, will face no competition and will be operated twice-weekly (Thursdays and Sundays) until October 23rd, using (MLT)’s 152-seat A320s.

Air Malta (MLT) has become one of the latest carriers to transition to a European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) air operator’s certificate (AOC).

Under new European regulations, developed by (EASA), all commercial air transport operators must switch to an (EASA) (AOC) by October 28. The change was originally due to come into force from October 2012, but all European Union (EU) states postponed implementation for two years, leading to the 2014 deadline.

UK leisure carrier Monarch Airlines (MON) announced earlier in August it had completed all requirements for an (EASA) (AOC), one of the first UK airlines to do so. “To comply with the new regulations and transition to an (EASA) (AOC), (MLT) was required to perform a thorough review of all policies and procedures.”

(MLT) described the process as “extensive” and said the main change involved a switch from the current Accident Prevention & Flight Safety Program to a Safety Management System (SMS). “(MLT) introduced (SMS) over last winter, and in the process, changed its safety processes and held appropriate (SMS) training for its entire workforce. (SMS) is a powerful tool in enhancing safety within an airline,” it said.

Air Malta (MLT) has appointed tourism specialist, Joseph Galea as deputy (CCO), with promotion to (CCO) planned in three years. The move comes as part of its continuing management restructure. The appointment follows the departure of former (MLT) (CEO) Peter Davies, who was replaced January 1 by Louis Giordimaina.

Galea, who was most recently International Marketing Director for the Malta Tourism Authority, will ultimately replace former (MLT) (CCO), Philip Saunders. However, while Galea builds up his experience with the airline, (MLT) will hire an international candidate as (CCO) on a three-year, fixed-term contract. “It is extremely difficult to find Maltese candidates, who also have the necessary commercial airline experience for such a role. Through these appointments, we will be using international expertise to develop Maltese talent. This type of succession planning, which has been absent from (MLT) in recent years, ensures continuity for years to come,” (MLT) Chairperson, Maria Micallef said.

“Air Malta once again finds itself at a crucial juncture. Revenues are under pressure due to increased competition and the suspension of Libya, one of our profitable routes. The (CCO) and his deputy will be immediately tasked with finding ways to develop a top revenue line, which is healthy and sustainable, two things which continue to evade (MLT), despite the ongoing implementation of the restructuring plan,” Giordimaina said.

September 2014: Air Malta (MLT) has announced Philip Micallef has been appointed its new (CEO), effective October 13. He succeeds Louis Giordimaina, who was appointed in November 2013 to replace the outgoing (CEO), Peter Davies.

Micallef was formerly (CEO) of the Bermuda Communications Regulatory Authority. (MLT) Chairperson, Maria Micallef said, “Philip has all the qualities and experience required to take this company forward and will officially take up the post on October 13th 2014. The board is also working very hard to have a full management team in place in the coming weeks.”

Micallef said, “I am under no illusions about the challenges that lie ahead but I feel honored and privileged to have been tasked with such an important role within a company that means so much to me and my country. I feel encouraged by the loyalty and resilience displayed by (MLT)'s employees in recent years.”

November 2014: News Item A-1: Air Malta (MLT) reported a pre-tax loss of -€16.2 million/-$20.3 million for the financial year ended March 31, well short of the €3.3 million targeted in the airline’s restructuring plan, but almost halved from a loss of -€31 million reported in the previous financial year.

(MLT) cited the loss of its lucrative Libyan market (costing the airline a reported -€1 million a month) and the effects of sanctions on Russia, as well as increased fleet maintenance costs and a +20% increase in seat capacity operated by competitor airlines in the peak summer months, as contributors to it failing to reach its restructuring plan targets.

However, Chairperson Maria Micallef said she was confident (MLT) was still on target to reach its commitment to break even by March 2016.
“Basically, these results send a very positive message,” Micallef said.

(MLT) started having liquidity problems in 2010 and was given European Union (EU) approval for a government loan, provided an effective restructuring plan was put in place. In March 2011, (MLT) reported a loss of -€78.3 million and the plan was accepted by the European Commission (EC) in June the following year. Losses have reduced annually since 2011, and although restructuring targets were not met last year or this, Micallef believes that at least the business is moving in the right direction.

Revenue was up year-on-year to €227.8 million from €221.3 million in the previous financial year, driven largely by a +10% increase in revenue per passenger, despite a -12% decrease in sectors flown.

Operating losses were reduced to -€12.7 million from -€26.2 million in the year-ago period, and operating costs decreased to €240.6 million from €247.3 million in the previous year, although this was some -€32 million less than the restructuring plan target of €208.6 million. Fuel costs increased by +€12.9 million despite a -10% decrease in flying hours over the period, and although employee costs were reduced by -€7.5 million, this was still less than the plan’s saving target of -€9.8 million.

Passenger numbers were up +4.5% to 1.8 million, and (ASK)s were up +5.3% to 3.7 billion year-over-year. Passenger load factor was slightly down from 76.5% LF in (FY) 2013 to 75.7% LF.

“The restructuring plan of 2012 sought to address the problem of profitability by 2016, and, to an extent, we are getting there,” Micallef said. “It is true that the results for both [last year and this] are not in line with the more ambitious restructuring plan which stipulated a loss of -€15 million in 2013 and a profit by 2014. However, the figures show that the aggregate financial situation of (MLT) is improving. Since 2011, (MLT) has managed to reduce its annual losses from -€78 million to -€16 million. No easy feat indeed.”

She said (MLT) had set itself a target of keeping losses for the year ending March 2015 at last year’s level of -€16 million.

News Item A-2: (MLT) appointed a new (CEO), Philip Micallef, in mid-October.

News Item A-3: An Italian woman was presented with a gift and a bouquet of flowers by Malta Tourism Authority on Friday for being the lucky 4 millionth passenger Malta International Airport (MIA) received this year.

The benchmark number was reached more than a month earlier than last year. "The figure means that the airport saw an average of more than >12,000 passengers every day, enough to fill up Wembley Soccer Stadium, UK each week," explained Markus Klaushofer, (CEO) at (MIA) airport.

For the period ending September, European airports reported a growth of +6.4%, while the (MIA) registered an increase of +7.2%.

Passenger traffic is forecast to exceed >4.2 million by the end of the year.

May 2015: Turkish Airlines (THY) is evaluating a strategic alliance with Air Malta (MLT), which may include a partial investment or a complete takeover of Air Malta (MLT), according to several Maltese media reports.

“Discussions on how to continue to improve our relationship with all the major airlines operating to and from Malta is an ongoing process,” Tourism Minister, Edward Zammit Lewis reportedly told the "Times of Malta."

A (THY) spokesperson would not confirm the reports. “We don’t have any decision on those issues,” the spokesperson said, adding that to give further information would require board approval and informing shareholders via the stock exchange.

Air Malta (MLT) currently operates a fleet of four Airbus A319s and six A320s. It reported a pre-tax loss of -€16.2 million/-$20.3 million for the financial year ended March 31 2014, significantly short of the +€3.3 million profit targeted in (MLT)’s restructuring plan, but almost halved from a loss of -€31 million reported in the previous financial year.

October 2015: Air Malta (MLT) expects to reduce its loss to around -€4 million/-$4.5 million for the financial year ending March 2016, but more work is required to improve productivity, Chairperson, Maria Micallef said at the annual general meeting on October 16.

Micallef said the -€4 million figure would be a further improvement in (MLT)’s financial position. Its loss for the year ended March 2015 was, as previously predicted, -€16.4 million, while just three years ago, when it began a major turnaround project, losses were -€78 million.

Micallef said the past year’s result had met predictions, despite the closure of its Libyan route (Malta has traditionally had extensive trade links with the North African nation, around one hour’s flying time to the south) and a drop in the number of Russian tourists, whose international travel plans have been badly hit by the fall in the value of the rouble.

The results were partially achieved by the sale of an airline owned hotel plus a €4 million saving achieved through renegotiating a catering contract. Over the past three years, the company has sold off a series of assets, rationalized its fleet, and has been through an extensive redundancy program.

Micallef said that if the positive trends from the first half of the current financial year continue, (MLT) would exit the restructuring program with an annual loss of -€4 million.

“For the first time in a number of years, we have started regaining our market share, despite intense competition and significant additional seat capacity on established routes bound to adversely affect the airline,” she said.

Despite the improved results, however, hurdles stay and lay ahead, she cautioned. “Like all other small airlines, we are still vulnerable. And this vulnerability will stay with us past March 2016.

“To overcome the hurdles and make (MLT) competitive, we must now start to tackle productivity and growth. Every expert we speak to is adamant: our workforce productivity in certain sectors must increase by at least +25%, if we are to grow to be competitive against other airlines,” Micallef said.

(MLT)’s heavily seasonal traffic means it would have to look again at staff. “Our traffic reduces substantially in winter. We therefore need flexibility. We cannot employ people all year round and deploy some of them only in summer months,” she said.

March 2016: "Airmalta Resumes Moscow Sheremetyevo Service from June 2016", Routes News, March 17, 2016.

airmalta (MLT) is starting June 2016 to resume service on Malta – Moscow Sheremetyevo route, as the airline moves Moscow operation back to Sheremetyevo. From JUNE 3, (MLT) operates Sheremetyevo service 2x-weekly, with Airbus A319 aircraft. This will replace existing service to/from Moscow Domodedovo.

airmalta (MLT) last operated Moscow Sheremetyevo service in October 2014.

January 2017: Alitalia (ALI) has terminated plans to take a major stake in neighboring national airline, airmalta (MLT). Talks on (ALI) taking a shareholding in (MLT), which were scheduled to be completed in summer 2016, had become increasingly protracted. Maltese newspapers speculated last weekend that negotiations between (ALI) and the Maltese government, which owns the tiny Mediterranean island’s airline, had broken down.

On January 13, (ALI) said the companies “have jointly decided to terminate the talks, which would have led to (ALI) becoming a 49% shareholder in (MLT). “The 2 airlines agreed that the current changing landscape in the airline industry was not ideal for such a transaction and that both airlines would concentrate on the current challenges without entering into a partnership.”

(ALI), which is nearing the end of a 3-year turnaround plan, again faces significant financial losses. (ALI) has been asked to present a detailed business plan the Italian government later this month. It was added that airmalta (MLT) and (ALI) would “continue to collaborate closely commercially through a recently launched, extensive code sharing program.”

September 2017: News Item A-1: Ryanair (RYR), is holding talks with Air Malta (MLT) over future areas of cooperation as (RYR) steps up its involvement in the small Mediterranean island.

The 2 carriers did not specify the nature of the potential cooperation. Maltese media reports suggested that a code share partnership, or combined sales and marketing initiatives, are in the cards. The news came as (RYR) announced a dozen new routes to Malta. 3 services (Belfast, Naples and Riga) will start in October, while the others (Aberdeen, Barcelona, Bratislava, Gothenburg, Paris Beauvais, Porto, Pescara, Seville, and Tallinn) will begin in the summer 2018 season. (RYR) estimates the new services will add some 700,000 passengers to the 1.8 million it already carries to Malta annually.

Ryanair (RYR) will also base a 5th Boeing 737-800 on the island.

(RYR) noted its increasing interest in connecting flights means that Malta-originating traffic could link up with 20 long-haul destinations operated by Spanish airline Air Europa (ARE) via Madrid and that Maltese travelers could also connect on to (RYR) services at Rome Fiumicino and Milan Bergamo.

Malta’s tourism minister, Konrad Mizzi, described the announcements as a vote of confidence in the island’s tourism sector.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
MLT-737
MLT-A319 - 2014-08
MLT-A319-114
MLT-A320
MLT-A320 - 2013-11
MLT-A320 - 2014-02
MLY-A319 and A320- 2017-08.jpg

September 2017:

0 737-2Y5 (JT8D-15A HK) (1414-23847, /87 9H-ABE "MELLIEHA;" 1418-23848, /87 9H-ABF "ZURRIEQ"), NORDAM HUSHKITS, 23848 RTND 2004-01. 23847 RTND. 129Y.

0 737-3H9 (CFM56-3B1) (1175-23416, /85 YU-ANI), (JAT) WET-LSD, RTND. 138Y.

0 737-3L9 (CFM56-3) (1402-23718, 9H-ADP), RTND (TCI), LST (CBD). 138Y.

0 737-3Y5 (CFM56-3C1) (2446-25613, /93 9H-ABR "BIRKIRKARA;" 2467-25614, /93 9H-ABS "SLIEMA;" 2478-25615, /93 9H-ABT "HAMRUN"), 25614 WET-LST (ANZ) TIL 2003-04. 25613; RTND, LST (NWG) 2005-10. 138Y.

0 737-33A (CFM56-3C1) (3007-24759, /98 9H-ADH; 3021-24760, /98 9H-ADI, WET-LST (JOR), (AWW) LSD, 24759 RF (AZR), RTND. 138Y.

0 737-382 (CFM56-3B2) (1695-24365, /89 9H-ADM; 2226-25161, /92 9H-ADN) (24365, LST (AZR) TIL 2001-03), EX-(TAP), (ILF) 5 YR LSD. 25161 RTND (AWW) 2004-05. 138Y.

0 737-4H6 (CFM56-3) (2877-27674; 2852-27673; RTND (MAS) 2000-03.

0 737-430 (CFM56-3) (27003 RTND 2000-04) (27007), EX-(ADH), (FLL) LSD. RTND.

0 737-5L9 (CFM56-3B1) (1816-24778, /90), EX-(MSK), (MRS) LST TIL 2001-11, RTND 2001-11. 129Y.

0 737-7L9 (CFM56-7B) (10-28004, OY-MRA; 11-28005, OY-MRB), RTND (MRS) 2000-11.

0 ORDER (2000-09) 757-200, (AAT) WET-LSD.

0 A310-200, (DLH) WET-LSD, INCL MAINT, RTND. 35C, 178Y.

2 A319-111 (CFM56-5B6/P) (2332, /04 9H-AEL "MARSAXLOKK;" 2382, /05 9H-AEM "BIRGU") (ILF) LSD 2005-02. 48C, 93Y.

3 A319-112 (CFM56-5B5/P) (2113, /04 9H-AEG "MDINA;" 2122, /04 9H-AEH "FLORIANA;" 2186, /04 9H-AEJ "SAN PAWI IL-BAHAR") (ILF) LSD 2004-03. 2113 WET-LST (SKB) 2005-12 & RTND 2006-03. 2113; LST (SKB) (AGAIN) 2007-10. 48C, 93Y.

0 A319-114 (CFM56-5A5) (636, /96 D-AILF; 700, D-AILN), (DLH) LSD TIL 2001-11. 132Y.

0 A320-200 (288, 9H-AED), EX-(GJT), (GAX) LSD 2003-08. RTND 2004-03. 168Y.

0 A320-211 (CFM56-5A1) (112, /90 9H-ABP "RABAT;" 293, /92 9H-ABQ "ZEJTUN"), (ILF) LSD, 1 (ADR) WET-LSD FOR 7 MTHS & RTND. 112 RTND, LST (ABZ) 2003-08. 293 RTND 2004-11. 168Y.

0 A320-211 (CFM56-5A1) (331, /92 9H-ADZ), (GAX) LSD 2002-04. RTND 2004-10. 168Y.

0 A320-211 (CFM56-5A1) (350, /92 YL-), EX-(ACN), (LAJ) LSD FOR 2 YRS 2007-02. RTND. 20C, 120Y.

0 A320-214 (CFM56-5B4/P) (1769, /01 9H-ADY; 2178, 9H-AER, 2004-04), (GAX) LSD. 1769; 2178; RTND 2004-11. 168Y.

2 A320-214 (CFM56-5B4/P) (2142, /03 9H-AEF "VALLETTA;" 2665, /05 9H-AEN "BORMIA") (ILF) LSD. 2142, LST (SSV) 2007-01. 2142; RF OLT EXPRESS 2012-07. 2665; LST (SSV) 2011-01 - 03. 180Y.

2 A320-214 (CFM56-5B4/P) (2189, /04 9H-AEI "RABAT - CITTA VITTORIA (GOZO);" 2291, /04 9H-AEK "SAN GILJAN;" 2768, /06 9H-AEO "ISLA CITTA INVICTA"), (ILF) LSD. 2189; RTND. 54C, 114Y.

2 A320-214 (CFM56-5B4/P) (3056, /07 9H-AEP "NADUR;" 3068, /07 9H-AEQ "TARXIEN"), (ILF) LSD 2007-03. 54C, 114Y.

0 AVRO RJ70 (LF507-1F) (E1254, /94 EI-COQ; E1258, /94 EI-CPJ; E1260, /94 EI-CPK; E1267, /95 EI-CPL), 4 WET-LST (AZR), 82Y.

0 AVRO RJ85 (LF507-1F) (E2299, /96 EI-CNI; E2300, /96 EI-CNJ; E2306, /97 EI-CNK), 3 WET-LST (AZR). E2306 ST BAHRAIN DEFENSE FORCE 2004-11. 92Y.

Management:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
MLT-1- PHILIP MICALLEF - 2014-10
MLT-1-LOUIS GIORDIMAINA
MLT-5-JOSEPH GALEA - 2014-08

MS MARIA MICALLEF, CHAIRPERSON.

PHILIP MICALLEF, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO) (2014-10)
Philip was formerly (CEO) of the Bermuda Communications Regulatory Authority. (MLT) Chairperson, Maria Micallef said, “Philip has all the qualities and experience required to take this company forward and will officially take up the post on October 13th 2014. The board is also working very hard to have a full management team in place in the coming weeks.”

Philip said, “I am under no illusions about the challenges that lie ahead but I feel honored and privileged to have been tasked with such an important role within a company that means so much to me and my country. I feel encouraged by the loyalty and resilience displayed by (MLT)'s employees in recent years.”

LOUIS GIORDIMAINA, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO) (2014-01) REPLACED BY PHILIP MICALLEF (2014-10).

CAPTAIN PATRICK CALLEJA, HEAD AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS.

CAPTAIN LAURENCE GATT, CHIEF OFFICER STRATEGIC FLEET REVIEW (MLAOPKM), (laurence.gatt@airmalta.com.mt) (2011-11).

CATHERINE TABONE, CHIEF OFFICER INTERNATIONAL & (EU) AFFAIRS/COMPANY SECRETARY.

PHILIP SAUNDERS, CHIEF COMMERCIAL OFFICER (CCO), EX-(TTA)/(DAT) (2011-05).

JOSEPH GALEA, DEPUTY (CCO) FOR A 3 YEAR TERM (2014-07).

ALFRED LUPI, CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER (CFO).

LAWRENCE GATT, CHIEF OFFICER FLIGHT OPERATIONS & ENGINEERING.

JOE SAMMUT, CHIEF OFFICER GROUND HANDLING.

MANUEL AGIUS, CHIEF CARGO OFFICER (2014-05).
Manuel joined Air Malta (MLT) in 1973 and has held various positions, including Group Head Cargo & Flight Services, & Chief Operator Operations.

JOHN ZAMMIT, CHIEF OFFICER CHAIRMAN'S OFFICE.

FRANS GRECH, CHIEF OFFICER ACCOUNTS.

LAWRENCE MIZZI, CHIEF OFFICER CORPORATE SERVICES.

ADRIAN COPPINI, CHIEF OFFICER HUMAN RESOURCES (HR) & CORPORATE SERVICES.

KEVIN MALLIA, CHIEF OFFICER INTERNAL AUDIT.

VICTOR CASSAR, CHIEF OFFICER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT).

LESLIE MUSCAT, CHIEF OFFICER BUSINESS PLANNING.

JOHN SAIBA, CHIEF OFFICER MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS (PR).

EMMANUEL AGIUS, CHIEF OFFICER PASSENGER & CARGO SERVICES.

ANTHONY CHIRCOP, CHIEF OFFICER TREASURY.

DOMINIC ATTARD, CHIEF OFFICER STRATEGIC PLANNING.

WILFRED BORG, CHIEF OFFICER SUBSIDIARIES.

NORMAN D'AMATO, CHIEF PILOT 737.

CAPTAIN CHARLES PALMIER, 737 TECHNICAL PILOT.

CAPTAIN R RISSO, CHIEF PILOT TRAINING.

SILVIO FALZON, HEAD OF ENGINEERING (2002-11).

ANTHONY MIFSUD, HEAD OF QUALITY.

KEVEN BONNICI, HEAD INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT).

LAURENCE GATT, MANAGER TECHNICAL PROJECTS.

GODWIN DARMANIN, SUPERVISOR PLANNING ENGINEERING.

ADRIAN RIZZO, SUPERVISOR DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING (MLAEDKM),
(adrian.rizzo@airmalta.com.mt).


AIR MALTA LUFTHANSA TECHNIK (LTL) MAINTENANCE REPAIR & OVERHAUL (MRO):

LOUIS GIORDIMAINA, (CEO), (louis.giordimaina@airmalta.com.mt) BECAME (CEO) OF AIR MALTA (MLT) (2014-01).

ONDREJ KONYVKA, ELECTRONIC ACCESS (EA) FOCAL
(ondrej.konyvka@airmalta.com.mt).

 
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