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Name: RAYTHEON AEROSPACE
7JetSet7 Code: RAY
Status: Operational
Region: NORTH AMERICA
City: TUCSON
Country: USA
Employees 72000
Web: raytheon.com
Email: thomas-j-woodhouse@raytheon.com
Telephone: +1 (520) 794-2777
Fax: + 1 (520) 794-2465
Sita:
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
RAY LOGO
RAY-2006-12
RAY-2014-09 - UPDATE
RAY-MRO-A
RAY-MRO-B
RAY-MRO-C

MEMBER OF THE RAYTHEON GROUP.

ADDRESS:
1151 EAST HERMANS ROAD, BLDG 845
TUCSON, ARIZONA AZ 85706-9367, USA

USA (United States of America) was established in 1776, it covers an area of 9,363,123 sq km, its population is 280 million, its capital city is Washington DC, and its official language is English.

DECEMBER 2000: 1 757-23A (25494), EX-AVIANCA (AVI), AWAS (AWW) LEASED.

JUNE 2001: 1 757-23A (25491, N38383), EX-AIR TRANSAT (AIJ), (AWW) LEASED.

JULY 2001: VERITAS CAPITAL, NEW YORK, COMPLETED PURCHASE OF 70% OF RAYTHEON (RAY).

FEBRUARY 2002: RAYTHEON (RAY) COMPLETES 1ST IN A SERIES OF AUTOLAND FLIGHT TESTS USING ITS LOCAL AREA AUGMENTATION SYSTEM (LAAS) AT SALT LAKE CITY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, USING A 737-900, WITH ROCKWELL COLLINS, GLU-920 MULTI-MODE RECEIVERS. THE LANDINGS INCLUDED A SERIES OF HANDS-OFF APPROACHES THROUGH TOUCHDOWN AND ROLLOUT, ON 2 DIFFERENT RUNWAYS. RAYTHEON IS DEVELOPING (LAAS) IN COOPERATION WITH THE (FAA), WHICH LATER IN 2002 WILL ACQUIRE GROUND STATIONS FOR INSTALLATION AT AIRPORTS ACROSS THE USA. INITIALLY, (LAAS) WILL PROVIDE (GPS)-BASED, CATEGORY 1 PRECISION APPROACH CAPABILITY, WITH LATER VERSIONS PROVIDING CATEGORY 2, & 3 CAPABILITY, FOR ALL-WEATHER, AUTOMATIC LANDINGS AND SURFACE NAVIGATION. ONE (LAAS) SYSTEM, WILL SERVICE AN ENTIRE AIRPORT AND WILL ALLOW FOR TAILORED APPROACHES TO AVOID OBSTACLES, NOISE-SENSITIVE AREAS, OR CONGESTED AIRSPACE.

July 2002: Raytheon (RAY) sold its construction and engineering business to Washington Group International (WGI). In a blow to (RAY)'s credibility, (RAY) for the 3rd time this year, has raised its estimate of how much it will cost to complete 2 power plant projects, which were abandoned by (WGI). The latest figure rose by another $450 million bringing the total cost of completion to $1.26 billion. The increase will be taken as a charge against 2nd Quarter earnings. On the positive side, (RAY) expects to absorb the higher cost through increase cash flow from its core defense business.

November 2002: Sue Baumgarten, President, Raytheon International (RAY), succeeding Hansel Tookes, who retired.

Raytheon Company 3rd Quarter = +$228 million (-$280 million).

December 2002: Tom Sarama, VP Strategic Programs. He was VP Engineering, and has been succeeded by David Riemer, now VP Product Development & Engineering. Edward Pliner, 44, CFO.

May 2003: Raytheon Aircraft (RAY) 1st Quarter = -$38 million (-$53 million).

July 2003: William H Swanson, 54, President and CEO, 31-year veteran of Raytheon (RAY), succeeds Daniel P Burnham, 56, who will remain Chairman.

Decides to cease support for the Beech Starship, and has selected Evergreen Air Center, Arizona, (EVR) to part out the fleet (considering donating some to museums & A&P schools). Currently owns 43 of the total 53 built and hopes to acquire the other 10 as trade-ins for its other models such as the Premier 1.

Raytheon Aircraft (RAY) 2nd Quarter = +$7 million/$2.2 billion backlog (+$11 million/$4.7 billion): delivered 1 (3) 1900D's; 13 (11) Hawkers; 8 (7) Premier I's; 7 (5) Beechjets; 21 (12) King Airs; & 20 (26) pistons.

October 2003: Raytheon Aircraft (RAY) 3rd Quarter = -$10 million (-$11 million): delivered 21 business jets & 18 King Airs (16 business jets; 16 King Airs; & 3 1900D's).

October 2004: 3rd Quarter = +$456 million (+$256 million): delivered 103 airplanes: 29 business jets, 31 King Airs, 25 pistons, 18 T-6As (80: 21 business jets, 18 King Airs, 22 pistons, 19 T-6As) & booked orders for 158 airplanes (57).

July 2005: $4.6 million contract top supply turnkey installation of an airport surveillance radar for Maiquetia International Airport, Caracas. Consorcio Hardwell Computer is the prime contractor for the project.

August 2006: Raytheon Aircraft Services (RAY) signed a three-year extension with International Flight Training Academy to continue its Bonanza and Baron pilot training program in California for All Nippon Airways (ANA).

Jack Harrington, VP Command & Control Systems, Raytheon Network Centre Systems.

October 2006: Michael Morgan, a 26-year veteran of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has been hired to lead Raytheon (RAY)/(HAC)’s $2.5 billion Intelligence & Information Systems (IIS) business. Morgan’s most recent assignment was with the (CIA)’s Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

December 2006: Raytheon (RAY) has agreed to sell its Raytheon Aircraft (RAC) business unit to a partnership made up of Goldman Sachs' investment arm GS Capital Partners and Canada's Onex for $3.3 billion. The company will be known as "Hawker Beechcraft" after completion of the deal, which is due to be completed by the second quarter of 2007 - see attached linked article.

April 2007: First quarter profit rose +21% on strong sales of missiles and battle operations communication systems, and improving results at an airplane unit that Raytheon (RAY) sold last month. Net income was +$346 million, or 76 cents per share, compared with +$287 million, or 64 cents per share, in last year's first quarter. Sales rose +6% to 4.93 billion from $4.66 billion. Not counting a one-time gain, (RAY)'s profit was +$314 million, or 69 cents per share. Shares of (RAY) rose +35 cents to end at $55.

January 2009: Raytheon (RAY) has won a $12.2 million US Air Force (USF) contract to study the feasibility of adding a radio frequency data link and increased power output for a possible Block II version of its developmental miniature air launched decoy jammer, with roughly 925 km/500 nm range for service entry in fiscal year 2013.

February 2009: The Raytheon Company (RAY), with 2008 sales of $23.2 billion, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, homeland security and other government markets throughout the world. With a history of innovation spanning 87 years, (RAY) provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration and other capabilities in the areas of sensing; effects; and command, control, communications and intelligence systems, as well as a broad range of mission support services. With headquarters in Waltham, Massachussetts, (RAY) employs 73,000 people worldwide.

July 2009: The Raytheon Company (RAY) reported second quarter 2009 income from continuing operations of +$504 million, up +17% compared to +$432 million in the second quarter 2008. "We are pleased with (RAY)'s continued, solid performance and strong financial position," said William Swanson, (RAY)'s Chairman & CEO. "We are well positioned domestically and internationally on a broad base of programs which create long-term shareholder value."

Net sales for the second quarter 2009 were $6.1 billion, up from $5.9 billion in the second quarter 2008.

September 2009: Raytheon Company (RAY) has entered into an agreement to acquire (BBN) Technologies, a privately-held world leader in research and development, and provider of critical solutions for national defense and security missions. The transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2009 subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals. The transaction is not expected to materially impact revenue or earnings per share for the fourth quarter of 2009, and is expected to be accretive in 2010.

BBN's diverse portfolio encompasses a range of technologies including advanced networking, speech and language technologies, information technologies, sensor systems, and cybersecurity. The company's deep scientific and engineering talent aligns well with (RAY)'s expertise and commitment to excellence. "(BBN) brings world class people, technologies and capabilities to (RAY) and our customers," said William H Swanson, Chairman & CEO, the Raytheon Company. "We expect all of our businesses to benefit from the application of BBN's research and development expertise and technologies across our product lines and programs. (BBN)'s rich technology heritage makes this a natural fit."

(BBN) Technologies has a long history of innovative products and solutions including The ARPANET (forerunner of the Internet). Current offerings include the Boomerang acoustic-based shooter detection system currently deployed with US forces, and a broad range of technology development programs, many considered mission-critical by defense and intelligence customers.

Following the acquisition, (BBN) Technologies will become part of Raytheon Network Centric Systems (NCS).

"(BBN)'s products and technical capabilities will enhance (NCS)' ability to offer critically important solutions to our customers," said Colin Schottlaender, President Network Centric Systems. "This acquisition will strengthen our positions in networking, communications, video surveillance and advanced sensing applications."

Based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, (BBN) employs 700 employees in seven USA locations.

"(BBN) has extraordinary technical depth in the areas in which we work," said Robert G Elmer, President & CEO of (BBN) Technologies. "Joining (RAY), an organization with very strong technical expertise and significant resources, will help us to broaden our reach, acting as a multiplier on our proven ability to deliver advances to the market rapidly and profitably, and better serve our ultimate client, the USA warfighter."

The Raytheon Company (RAY), with 2008 sales of $23.2 billion, is a technology and innovation leader specializing in defense, homeland security and other government markets throughout the world. With a history of innovation spanning 87 years, (RAY) provides state-of-the-art electronics, mission systems integration and other capabilities in the areas of sensing; effects; and command, control communications and intelligence systems; as well as a broad range of mission support services. With headquarters in Waltham, Massachusetts, (RAY) employs 73,000 people worldwide.

October 2009: Main Base: Tucson International airport, Arizona.

Hub: Los Angeles International airport (LAX), California.

(ICAO) Code: FTO.

February 2011: The Raytheon Company (RAY), with 2010 sales of $25 billion, employs 72,000 people worldwide.

(RAY) announced the completion of its tender offer, through its wholly owned subsidiary RN Acquisition Company, for all outstanding shares of Applied Signal Technology (AST), Inc. Following the acquisition, (AST) will be integrated into (RAY)'s Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) business and will be renamed Raytheon Applied Signal Technology, Inc.

March 2011: Raytheon (RAY) was selected to supply a radar system to replace legacy equipment at Manchester Airport in the United Kingdom under an extension to NATS’ Radar Site Services (RSS) program.

This additional system for Manchester Airport, comprising an ASR-10SS S-Band Primary Surveillance Radar with a Mode S Monopulse Secondary Surveillance Radar, brings to 25 the number of systems that Raytheon UK is delivering at NATS’ sites throughout the UK.

“Raytheon (RAY) has collaborated closely with us over the past 11 years to ensure our national radar network is performing for the optimum benefit of our customers with a continual program of upgrading and modernizing,” said David Hawken, NATS Engineering service delivery General Manager. “We look forward to this site being included.”

“(RSS) is a flagship program for Raytheon UK,” said Richard Daniel, Raytheon UK Director, Defence & Program Leadership. “The extension of the contract further demonstrates (RAY)’s ability to deliver turnkey radar solutions worldwide.

October 2011: Raytheon (RAY) has partnered with AirDat LLC and Metron Aviation to develop solutions for the (FAA)’s NextGen weather programs. The team will address two of the major (FAA) programs, NextGen Network Enabled Weather and NextGen Weather Processor.

(RAY) said it will use (FAA) automation systems and decision-support tools, and “take full advantage of” integration into the USA National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)'s 4-Dimensional Weather Cube.

Raytheon Aerospace (RAY) was awarded a $24 million contract to modernize air traffic management systems in the Kyrgyz Republic, including the country's main international airport near the capital city, Bishkek.

The procured contract calls for the delivery of a wide area multilateration (WAM)-based air traffic control (ATC) system, (ATC) radio systems, a new air traffic control tower (ATCT) at Manas International Airport, and related ancillary equipment and systems integration services. The contracting authority is the US Air Force Electronic Systems Center, which is procuring this contract via the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program.

"In an effort to expand our global Air Traffic Management (ATM) customer base, we will, for the first time, provide the Kyrgyz Republic with improved (ATM) capabilities and flight capacity," said Mike Prout, VP for Raytheon Network Centric Systems' Security and Transportation Systems. "Thanks to a continued partnership with the US Air Force and with over >60 years of experience as a proven large scale (ATM) provider, we are confident that our systems will provide the best value for the US government and the Kyrgyz Republic."

The Raytheon (RAY) team, which includes Saab Sensis Corporation, of Syracuse, New York, will establish a safe and effective air management system for en-route air traffic within the Kyrgyz Republic along with airplanes operating at the Manas International Airport. Saab Sensis is a world-recognized leader in (WAM) technology. (RAY) is the prime contractor and system integrator. (RAY) will also design and construct a new (ATCT) at Manas International Airport and supply new communications systems and interfaces to the existing air traffic management infrastructure. Construction and (ATCT) design services will be supported by Serka Construction, based in Turkey.

November 2011: The Raytheon Company (RAY) is on track to provide Dubai with one of the world's most modern air traffic management (ATM) systems to safely and efficiently meet Dubai's ambitious airport and air traffic growth plans. (RAY)'s next-generation (ATM) system, AutoTrac III (AT3), installed at Dubai World Central's Al Maktoum International Airport, is scheduled to be operational next year.

(RAY) is a global leader in (ATM), with systems in more than >50 countries helping to control more than 60% of the world's airspace. (RAY) has delivered air traffic control systems across the Middle East, including installations in the (UAE), the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Oman, Lebanon, Iraq, and Kurdistan.

"(RAY)'s next generation (ATM) automation system provides a high-performance, cost-effective solution for the world's rapidly growing air traffic demands," said Stephen DuMont, director of International (ATM) for Raytheon Network Centric Systems. "The system contains some of the most advanced surveillance and flight data processing systems available today, and we are extremely pleased that our partnership with Dubai Aviation City Corporation Engineering Projects and Dubai Air Navigation Services will give Dubai one of the world's most modern (ATM) systems to safely and efficiently meet its ambitious aviation growth plans."

(RAY)'s (AT3) system will provide air traffic control (ATC) automation for the Dubai terminal airspace and provide approach control services for Al Maktoum International, Dubai International, Sharjah International, and Al Minhad Airbase. The system will also support tower operations at the Dubai International and Al Maktoum International Airports. The (AT3) system installed in Dubai includes advanced safety and efficiency features, such as multi-radar tracking capabilities, advanced flight data processing, advanced safety net functions, online data interchange, arrival and departure management, and electronic flight strips.

February 2013: Raytheon (RAY) has opened a new silicon carbide manufacturing foundry facility in Scotland. The company is investing in silicon carbide as a “next-generation semiconductor technology,” applicable in several industries including aerospace. “What was previously unachievable is now possible with silicon carbide,” Raytheon (RAY) UK, (CEO), Bob Delorge said, “as it allows for smaller and lighter electronics to operate in harsh environments, and addresses a real customer need for significant energy efficiency savings in the manufacture of power switching and rectifying components (AC/DC converters).”

Investment in the foundry has so far exceeded >£3.5 million/$5.5 million. “This places the company at the start of a journey to exploit new global markets for this cost-efficient material,” Delorge said.

Silicon carbide components are able to operate at higher voltages and hotter temperatures than pure silicon. It can achieve these results while being one-third the weight and volume of pure silicon parts, (RAY) said, adding it is the first company to have tested silicon carbide circuit devices at temperatures of up to 400 degrees Celsius.

January 2014: Thomas Kennedy will take over as (CEO) of Raytheon (RAY) on March 31, 2014.

William Swanson has served as Raytheon (RAY)'s (CEO) since 2003 and will continue to serve as Chairman of the board of directors during the leadership change.

Thomas Kennedy will take over the fourth largest defense contractor in the USA within a reduced defense-spending environment that has forced other large aerospace and defense contractors such as (BAE) Systems and Rockwell Collins to expand their commercial offerings. In October, the company reported that its third-quarter profit fell by -2.8% due to USA government spending cuts known as sequestration.

Kennedy has served as Executive VP & Chief Operating Officer (COO) since April 2013, where he led the consolidation of Raytheon (RAY)'s six businesses to four to reduce operating costs. (RAY)'s lead director, Vern Clark, calls Kennedy a "proven leader with a broad understanding of key technologies, keen customer focus and a deep understanding of Raytheon (RAY)'s business."

November 2014: ThalesRaytheonSystems (THL)/(RAY) has completed system testing for the National Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO) Air Command and Control System (ACCS) program. The tests demonstrated the system’s ability to operate in a network configuration, linking the pilot sites at Lyon Mont Verdun in France, Glons in Belgium, Uedem in Germany and Poggio Renatico in Italy.

During the tests, the system handled a daily number of military air movements several times higher than for any operations conducted up to now, proving its ability to interconnect (NATO) and National Air Command and Control (AirC2) units across four European nations into a single integrated (AirC2) system.

October 2015: News Item A-1: "US Air Force Selects Northrop Grumman (GRU) as Partner on Long-Range Strike Bomber" by www.aviationnews.eu Rob Vogelaar, October 28, 2015.

The US Air Force (USF) has selected Northrop Grumman Corporation (GRU) to deliver the nation’s new Long-Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B) - - see attached - - "GRU-Long-Range Strike Bomber - 2015-10.jpg. This selection continues (GRU)’s 35-year partnership with the US Air Force (USF) in providing the world’s most advanced long-range strike systems.

“The Air Force has made the right decision for our nation’s security,” said Wes Bush, Chairman, (CEO) & President, Northrop Grumman (GRU). “As the company that developed and delivered the B-2 Spirit stealth bomber, we look forward to providing the Air Force with a highly-capable and affordable next-generation Long-Range Strike Bomber. “Our team has the resources in place to execute this important program, and we’re ready to get to work,” Bush added.

News Item A-2: Cyber security experts at Raytheon Company (RAY) are upgrading encryption modules in a satellite communications system (SATCOM) for the B-2 bomber to enhance the strategic aircraft's information security.

News Item A-3: "Northrop Grumman (GRU) to Refine Radar Software for Global Hawk Ground & Airborne Surveillance (UAV)" by www.militaryaerospace.com John Keller Editor, October 18, 2015.

HANSCOM AIR FORCE BASE, Massachusetts, October 12, 2015: - Surveillance radar experts at Northrop Grumman Corporation (GRU) are refining software in an advanced radar system aboard the Global Hawk Block 40 long-range unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that tracks slow-moving ground vehicles and low-flying cruise missiles.

Officials of the US Air Force (USF) Life Cycle Management Center at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, announced a $17 million contract modification to the Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems segment in El Segundo, California, for radar software corrections for the Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program (MP-RTIP).

The (USF)'s (MP-RTIP) program is developing a modular, active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar system scalable for the Global Hawk UAV and the Air Force Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (Joint (STARS)).

The Raytheon Company (RAY) Space & Airborne Systems segment in El Segundo, California, is a primary subcontractor on the (MP-RTIP) program, and is in charge of the radar system's hardware development.

The (MP-RTIP) system is being created from previously developed Northrop-Grumman (GRU) radar technology, including the (USF)'s E-8 Joint (STARS) aircraft and the existing Global Hawk radar system.

The block 40 Global Hawk is larger than the original Global Hawk models, with a longer fuselage, larger payload capacity, larger electrical output, and longer wingspan.

The (MP-RTIP) radar that Northrop Grumman (GRU) and Raytheon (RAY) are developing will be able to track slow-moving ground vehicles and low-flying cruise missiles. Compared with existing ground-surveillance radar systems, the (MP-RTIP) will have enhanced resolution and will be able to collect ground moving target indicator imagery and synthetic aperture radar still images simultaneously.

Northrop Grumman (GRU) and Raytheon (RAY) started developing the (MP-RTIP) radar system in late 2000, and company experts have finished the system's basic design, development, testing, and systems integration.

The Block 40 configuration of the RQ-4 Global Hawk first flew in late 2009. Northrop Grumman (GRU) began integrating the (MP-RTIP) radar aboard the Global Hawk Block 40 in 2012.

On this contract modification, Northrop Grumman (GRU) will do the work in El Segundo, California, and should be finished in November 2016.

For more information contact Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems online at www.northropgrumman.com, or the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at www.wpafb.af.mil/aflcmc.

November 2015: News Item A-1: "LRS-B Jet Bomber Starting Out on the Right Track, But We Should Keep a Close Eye on This Project" by www.militaryaerospace.com John Keller Editor, November 3, 2015.

The US Air Force (USF) appears to be on the right track with its plan to develop a new jet bomber (the Long-Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B)). Some of the best aspects that have come out of limited (LRS-B) details so far are cost, avionics upgradeability, and pilot (FC) safety.

Air Force leaders announced last month their choice of the Northrop Grumman Corporation Aerospace Systems segment in Redondo Beach, California, to develop the (LRS-B). The contract, of undisclosed value, is for Engineering & Manufacturing Development (EMD) (the Pentagon's term for full-scale development).

I especially like three things about the (LRS-B) project, which if the (USF) can stay on course will bode well for the big jet bomber project and most likely prevent its cancellation in the future. Plans now call for the (LRS-B) to join the (USF) aircraft fleet in the mid 2020s:

1. First is cost. (USF) leaders say they plan to develop a bomber that can deliver conventional and nuclear weapons anywhere in the world from bases within the Continental USA at a cost of about one-third of today's most advanced (USF) bomber, the Northrop Grumman (GRU) B-2 Spirit stealth bomber.

2: Second is technology. The (USF) seeks to use an open-systems architecture for the plane's avionics and other subsystems. This approach will help mitigate the effects of electronics component obsolescence and has the potential to ensure the bomber can be designed and retrofitted with the latest electronic technologies over the duration of its lifetime.

3. Third is the (USF)'s plan to introduce optionally piloted versions of the (LRS-B) sometime after the plane's introduction. This plane won't see action for at least 10 years, and just imagine the advances in unmanned aircraft technology that will come over the next decade.

While the (LRS-B) today is envisioned primarily as a piloted aircraft, I would imagine that ultimately the plane's operations mostly will be unmanned. Let's face it, for most of that aircraft's routine missions there won't be much need for human pilots (FC) to be aboard (even in heavily contested environments).

I suspect that (LRS-B) pilots (FC) nearly all the time will be safely on the ground at unmanned aircraft operating centers at (USF) air bases. In addition, we don't know what the next 10 years will bring in aircraft automation technology.

With apologies to today's (USF) bomber pilots (FC), it may turn out that the (LRS-B) will be more effective and survivable without human pilots (FC) on board. Think of what it takes to accommodate a human pilot (FC): air conditioning, survival gear, protective systems, oxygen, and the list goes on. Might the space on that aircraft be better used for weapons, sensors, electronic warfare equipment, and other systems dedicated to the attack mission?

All this sounds good on paper, but we'll see how things play out as the (LRS-B) program moves forward. It's rare for major weapons programs to avoid deep problems like cost overruns, requirements creep, or compromising capability to stay within budget constraints.

Curiously, the only references to dollar figures in (USF)'s (LRS-B) announcement were to 2010 dollars (that's five-years-ago dollars, not this-year's dollars). It comes across as deceptive, as if the (USF) is trying to conceal what the real (LRS-B) program costs will be.

Each dollar-value reference, furthermore, is based on an estimate (again in five-years-ago dollars). "The independent estimate for the (EMD) phase is $21.4 billion in 2010 dollars," reads one passage. Here's another: "Based on approved requirements, the Average Procurement Unit Cost (APUC) per aircraft is required to be equal to or less than <$550 million per aircraft in 2010 dollars, when procuring 100 (LRS-B) aircraft. The (APUC) from the independent estimate supporting today’s award is $511 million per aircraft, again in 2010 dollars."

So what's with the shell game of estimating program costs based on what money was worth half a decade ago? This doesn't sound good to me at all. The Pentagon is very experienced with shuffling cost estimates on major weapons programs to make things sound good.

On aircraft programs there is program cost, which takes the entire cost of the program (the anticipated costs of research and development, manufacturing, maintenance, and upgrades) and dividing that by the number of aircraft to be made. You can see how changing the number of aircraft to be built, VASTLY changes the program cost of each airplane.

Then there's fly-away cost, which is an estimate simply of what it costs to build one airplane, without including research, development, and other non-manufacturing program costs. There are other kinds of cost estimates as well, of which that come in handy when the (USF) approaches Congress or the public to give program updates.

Right now, (USF) leaders say they want to build 100 Long-Range Strike Bombers. I couldn't imagine the actual number will come anywhere close to that.

Then there are technology challenges. Radar-evading stealth technologies are only a part of what will be necessary for the (LRS-B) to operate and prevail on a modern technology-dominated battlefield. Not only do USA adversaries have advanced radar systems, but they also have infrared, acoustic, and other kinds of sensors that could put the plane in jeopardy.

Electronic warfare, optical warfare, and cyber warfare capability also will be paramount to enable the new bomber to avoid modern surface-to-air missiles and other aspects of air defenses in-depth. No matter how technologically advanced the new plane might be, it still has to fight and survive in the most dangerous airspace the world has ever imagined.

Will the (LRS-B) be expensive? Of course it will. Will there be technological roadblocks to overcome? Certainly. The real question is what kind of national security value will we get for what the (LRS-B) will cost? For now, so far, so good. All of us, however, would be well-advised to keep a very close eye on this program.

News Item A-2: "Boeing to Upgrade Radar Systems on 46 Air Force (USF) F-15C/D Jet Fighters & F-15E Fighter-bombers" by John Keller
www.militaryaerospace Editor, November 6, 2015.

WRIGHT-PATTERSON (AFB), Ohio, November 6th, 2015: - Jet fighter experts at the Boeing Company (TBC) will install 46 upgraded radar systems in US Air Force F-15 combat jets under terms of a $281.7 million contract announced earlier this month.

Officials of the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio are asking the Boeing Defense, Space & Security segment in St Louis to install the upgraded radar systems on Air Force F-15C/D jet fighters, and F-15E fighter-bombers.

Boeing (TBC), the original manufacturer of the F-15C/D and F-15E combat jets, will install the Raytheon (RAY) (APG-63(V)3) radar on 17 F-15C/D jet fighters, and the (Raytheon AN/APG-82) radar systems on 29 F-15E fighter-bombers under the terms of the contract.

The F-15, built by Boeing predecessor, McDonnell Douglas Corporation, is a twin-engine, all-weather tactical air-superiority jet fighter. It was designed in the late 1960s and first entered service in 1976. The F-15E is a ground-attack version of the original F-15 that first entered service in 1989.

The Raytheon (RAY) (APG-63(V)3) and (AN/APG-82) radar systems use active electronically scanned array (AESA) technology, which is a phased-array radar approach that can steer the radar beam without mechanically moving the radar transceiver antenna.

(AESA) radar use many solid-state transceivers in an antenna array. It steers the radar beam by emitting separate radio signals from each module. This kind of radar is difficult to detect over background noise and enables F-15 combat jets to broadcast powerful radar signals, while still remaining somewhat stealthy.

The Raytheon (RAY) (APG-63(V)3) is a more modern variant of (RAY)'s (APG-63(V)2), and applies the same kind of (AESA) technology that Raytheon (RAY) uses in the company's (APG-79) designed for the Navy Boeing F/A-18 Hornet fighter-bomber. The (APG-63(V)3) has been in service since 2006.

The Raytheon (AN/APG-83) radar for the F-15E, meanwhile, combines the processor of the (APG-79) radar with the antenna of the (APG-63(V)3) (AESA) being on the F-15C/D. This radar upgrade is part of the F-15E Radar Modernization Program (RMP). The new radar includes a wideband radome that enables the radar array to operate on more radar frequencies, and has improvements to environmental control and electronic warfare (EW) systems.

On this contract, Boeing (TBC) will do the work in St Louis and should be finished by early 2019.

For more information contact Boeing Defense, Space & Security online at www.boeing.com/defense, or the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at www.wpafb.af.mil/aflcmc.

February 2016: The (FAA) has granted Raytheon (RAY) a $135 million contract modification to upgrade Air Traffic Control (ATC) systems at the final 22 airports of the Standard Terminal Automation System (STARS). Implementation of (STARS) at these 22 sites will complete the NextGen terminal automation modernization of every major (FAA) National Air Space (NAS) facility by December 2019.

(STARS) provides terminal automation with a single operational baseline. This simplifies the implementation of future NextGen enhancements designed to maintain safety and bring efficiencies to an increasingly congested (NAS). (STARS) is a standard system used by both the (FAA) and the Department of Defense. It replaces several generations and versions of existing terminal automation systems, providing substantial savings in life cycle costs. The system brings additional safety and capacity management features to terminal automation in both the commercial and defense sectors, according to Raytheon (RAY).

"This platform has the processing capacity to allow greatly improved efficiency for the controllers, airlines and flying public," said Michael Espinola, Managing Director of Raytheon Air Traffic Systems.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
RAY-USF-UAV Global Hawk - 2015-10.jpg

August 2017

1 727-223 (JT8D-15 HK) (1765-22467, /81 N289MT), TESTBED WITH F-15 NOSE.

1 757-23A (611-25494), EX-(AVI), (AWW) LSD.

1 757-23A (RB211-535E4) (511-25491, /92 N38383), EX-(AIJ), (AWW) LSD 2001-06.

1 DC-10-10 (CF6-6K) (65-46524, /72 N910SF "SWEET JUDY"), R & D TESTBED.

1 CONVAIR 580 SCD (AN 501-D13) (500, /58 N580HH), EXPERIMENTAL PLATFORM WITH SPECIAL NOSE RADOME.

Management:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
RAY
RAY-1 - THOMAS KENNEDY - 2014-01
RAY-CEO

WILLIAM SWANSON, CHAIRMAN, THE RAYTHEON COMPANY (2003-07).

THOMAS KENNEDY, (CEO) (2014-03).

MS SUE BAUMGARTEN, PRESIDENT, RAYTHEON INTERNATIONAL (2002-11).

BOB DELORGE, (CEO) RAYTHEON UK.

COLIN SCHOTTLAENDER, PRESIDENT RAYTHEON NETWORK CENTRIC SYSTEMS.

DAVID WAJSGRAS, SENIOR VP & CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER (CFO).

THOMAS SARAMA, VP STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, RAYTHEON AIRCRAFT (2002-12).

DAVID REIMER, VP PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & ENGINEERING (2002-12).

BIGGS PORTER, VP & CORPORATE CONTROLLER (2003-05), LEXINGTON, MA.

MICHAEL MORGAN, HEAD INTELLIGENCE & INFORMATION SYSTEMS (IIS),
EX-(CIA) (2006-10).

STEPHEN DUMONT, DIRECTOR INTERNATIONAL (ATM), RAYTHEON NETWORK CENTRIC SYSTEMS.

MICHAEL ESPINOLA, MANAGING DIRECTOR RAYTHEON AIR TRAFFIC SYSTEMS.

MS LAURA MCGILL, CHIEF ENGINEER, AIR WARFARE SYSTEMS, RAYTHEON.

JOHN VINCENT, QUALITY CONTROL (QC) ENGINEERING MANAGER
(John.C.Vincent@L-3Com.com) (vincentjc@isl-3com.com).

BILL CAMPBELL, QUALITY ENGINEER
(William.B.Campbeljr@L-3com.com).

 
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