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Airlines

Name: FLYSAFAIR
7JetSet7 Code: SFA
Status: Operational
Region: AFRICA
City: JOHANNESBURG
Country: SOUTH AFRICA
Employees 400
Web: flysafair.co.za
Email: info@flysafair.co.za
Telephone: +27 (11) 928 0000
Fax: +27 (11) 395 1314
Sita: JNBOOFA
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
SFA-2004-01-NEWS
SFA-2004-06
SFA-2004-08
SFA-2004-09
SFA-2005-10-A
SFA-2005-TOP50-LSG-A
SFA-2005-TOP50-LSG-B
SFA-2013-10 - FLYSAFAIR 737-400
SFA-2014-08-FLYSAFAIR 737-400
SFA-2014-10 - flysafair.jpg
SFA-LOGO - FLYSAFAIR
SFA-MAINTENANCE MRO-A
SFA-MAP-FEB09
SFA-SAFAIR LOGO

FORMED IN 1969 AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 1970. SUBSIDIARY OF IMPERIAL HOLDINGS LTD. FORMERLY SAFAIR FREIGHTERS. HEADQUARTERS AT KEMPTON PARK. SCHEDULED & CHARTER PASSENGER & CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
PO BOX 938
KEMPTON PARK
JOHANNESBURG GAUTENG, 1620, SOUTH AFRICA

SOUTH AFRICA (REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA) WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1910. THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGES ARE: AFRIKAANS, & ENGLISH. IT COVERS AN AREA OF 1.12 MILLION SQ KM. THE POPULATION IS 44 MILLION. THE CAPITAL CITY IS PRETORIA.

AUGUST 1993: AEROSAF, IA A JOINT VENTURE WITH (CIS) FOR MAINTENANCE OF AEROFLOT (ARO) AN-12, AN-26, AN-32, IL-62 & IL-76 AIRPLANES.

MARCH 1995: 1 727F (JT8D-7B) DELIVERY.

APRIL 1995: 1 727-200 ADVANCED (JT8D-15) TO AIR SIBIR (SBR). 1 727-100F (19131), EX-TAIWANESE OPERATOR, UPGRADED FOR EXPRESS AIR SERVICES (XPS) (FAST FREIGHT COMPANY, SMALL PARCELS). TO MODIFY 4 727 PASSENGER AIRPLANES TO FULL FREIGHTER CONFIGURATIONS USING (AEI) SUPPLEMENTAL TYPE CERTIFICATE (STC).

NOVEMBER 1995: NEGOTIATING TO DO "D" CHECKS ON 3 SYRIAN AIR (SYR) 727'S. CONFISCATED 727-100 (18426) FROM OWNER WHO OWED MAINTENANCE FEES. ATLANTIC AIR, CAPE TOWN, NEGOTIATING FOR SAFAIR (SFA) TO DO (PHO) 727'S.

FEBRUARY 1996: 2 727-200A'S (JT8D-17 & -17A) (21851), EX-AVIANCA (AVI), & (22759) EX-ACES (ACE).

MAY 1996: 1 727-200 (JT8D-17R), AGES LEASED, 1 737-200 (JT8D-17R) TO (VNS), 1 L-381G HERCULES (501-D22A), EX-(NWT) AIR (NTA).

AUGUST 1996: SOLD HEAVY MAINTENANCE DIVISION TO RIVAL, DENEL AVIATION (SIE) RESULTING IN DOWNSIZING OF MANAGEMENT - CHRIS BESTER
VP ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE; DON THOMAS MANAGER TECHNICAL SERVICES; JAN SCHUTTE DIVISIONAL MANAGER TECHNICAL SERVICES; ALL 3 LET GO.

1 727-200 (JT8D-15), EX-INTER AIR (ITI).

MAY 1997: 3 MD-82'S (JT8D-217C), EX-AUSTRIAN AIRLINES (AUL), LEASED TO SUN AIR (SUQ). 2 ORDERS (DECEMBER 1997) MD-81'S (48016; 48018), EX-(AUL), LEASED TO (SUQ).

SEPTEMBER 1997: 1 LOCKHEED 382G RETURNED FROM TRANSAFRIK INTERNATIONAL (TCL).

JAN 1998: 727-260 (21978) SOLD TO (PAC) AVIATION HOLDINGS. 1 MD-81 (JT8D-217C), EX-AUSTRIAN AIRLINES (AUL).

FEBRUARY 1998: 3RD 727-200 LEASED TO COMAIR (CML).

APRIL 1998: 240 EMPLOYEES.

MAY 1998: SOLD 1 727-200 (21851) TO FALCON AIR EXPRESS, FLORIDA, USA, "D" CHECK/PAINT, BY HAMILTON AVIATION, EX-AVIANCA (AVI). 1 727-230 (21623), EX-LUFTHANSA (DLH), FOR COMAIR (CML) OPERATIONS, EX-SILVER AIR.

JUNE 1998: WITH BELGIUM SHIPPING GROUP (CMB), JOINTLY BUYS HUNTING CARGO AIRLINES (HCA) FOR $14 MILLION.

727-225F (20382), & 727-281F (20466), EX-(HCA).

AUGUST 1998: 727-200 (21623) LEASED TO COMAIR (CML).

SEPTEMBER 1998: 727-200F (20637), EX-EXPRESS ONE INTERNATIONAL (EOI), AIRCORP LEASED OPERATES FOR SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA) CARGO/(DHL). LOCKHEED L382G HERCULES (4676) RETURNED FROM SCHREINER AIRWAYS (SCH) & ANOTHER FROM HEAVYLIFT (HVL).

DECEMBER 1998: ACQUIRED BY IMPERIAL HOLDINGS, A LOCAL TRANSPORT & AUTOMOTIVE COMPANY FOR $40 MILLION. ALL SAFAIR (SFA) ENGINEERING INTERESTS, INCLUDING 727F CONVERSIONS WERE SOLD TO DENEL IN 1997.

FLEET NOW 7 727-200'S, & 5 MD-80'S, ALL OPERATED BY COMAIR (CML) 727'S, AND SUN AIR (SUQ) 727'S, & MD-80'S.

APRIL 1999: 293 EMPLOYEES. SITA: JNBOOFA.

(http://www.safair.co.za). (dandrew@safair.co.za).

MAY 1999: 2 L-100-30'S (35C-4673, ZS-JIV; 35C-4676, ZS-JVL), LEASED TO AIR CONTRACTORS (HCA). L-100-30 (69C-5027), EX-AIR CHINA (BEJ).

JUNE 1999: 727-294 (22044), EX-QATAR AIRWAYS (QTA), WET-LEASED TO COMAIR (CML). 727-200 (ZS-NVR) RETURNED FROM SUN AIR (SUQ).

JULY 1999: 727-230 (20673, ZS-NVR) SOLD TO COMAIR (CML).

AUGUST 1999: SAFAIR (SFA) PARENT, IMPERIAL LEASING GROUP BOUGHT NATIONAL AIRWAYS CORPORATION (NAC), & STREAMLINE AVIATION. (NAC) IS SOUTH AFRICA'S LARGEST GENERAL AVIATION COMPANY, WHICH SPECIALIZES IN CHARTERS, SALES, MAINTENANCE & SERVICE ON AIRPLANES & HELICOPTERS, WITH ANNUAL TURNOVER OF #400 MILLION RAND.

727-294 (22044) LEASED TO OMAN AIR (OMR).

JANUARY 2000: 2 MD-82'S (48019; 48059), EX-SUN AIR (SUQ), 4 YEAR LEASED TO AIR LIBERTE (ALB). MD-82 (48020), EX-(SUQ), LEASED TO DINAR (DIR) FOR 5 YEARS.

APRIL 2000: 306 EMPLOYEES.

MAY 2000: HUBS: CAPE TOWN, & SINGAPORE.

3 MD-80'S, EX-SUN AIR (SUQ), WET-LEASED TO SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA). 737-230 (714-22119) BOUGHT FROM COMAIR (CML), AND LEASED BACK.

JUNE 2000: PURCHASED 13 737-200'S FROM SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA), & LEASED BACK FOR 66 MONTHS. 1 ATR 72-202 (207, F-GPOB), LEASED TO FRENCH POST OFFICE (FPO).

JULY 2000: 2 MD-81'S, EX-AUSTRIAN AIRLINES (AUL) (48016; 48018) LEASED TO SPIRIT AIRLINES (SPR).

AUGUST 2000: 1 L-100-30 HERCULES (4475) LEASED 2 YEARS TO AIR CONTRACTORS (HCA).

SEPTEMBER 2000: 2 MD-82'S (49115; 49164), EX-AUSTRIAN AIRLINES (AUL), 5 YEAR LEASED TO AIR LIBERTE (ALB), STARTING NEXT MONTH. $70.7 MILLION, 10 ORDERS 737-700'S (CFM56-7). 737-25A (1422-23790, V5-ANA) BOUGHT FROM AIR NAMIBIA (NAM), AND LEASED BACK. 1 737-236 (670-21802, ZS-SIN) BOUGHT FROM ICON.

OCTOBER 2000: 1 L-100-382 LOCKHEED HERCULES LEASED TO FEDEX (FED), FOR EUROPEAN SERVICES.

NOVEMBER 2000: FISCAL YEAR (FY) 1999 = #100 MILLION RAND.

1 737-230 (22116), EX-(ASM), LEASED TO SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA). 1 737-236 (628-21792, ZS-SIO), BOUGHT FROM ICON, LEASED TO (SAA). 1 737-2L9 (550-21686, /79 V5-ANB), EX-MAERSK AIR (MRS)/COMAIR (CML), LEASED AIR NAMIBIA (NAM).

DECEMBER 2000: WILL WORK WITH BOEING AND (CFMI) TO EXPAND SAFAIR (SFA)'S EXISTING MAINTENANCE AND TRAINING SERVICE FACILITY, TO PROVIDE COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCE SERVICES TO ITS LEASE CUSTOMERS.

2 ORDERS 737-700'S. MD-82 (1182-49164) LEASED TO AIR LIBERTE (ALB).

JANUARY 2001: 1 737-236 (644-22026), EX-BRITISH AIRWAYS (BAB), LEASED TO SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS (SAA).

FEBRUARY 2001; 1 737-2L9 (550-21686, ZS-NLN) LEASED TO AIR NAMIBIA (NAM), IN NOVEMBER.

APRIL 2001: HUBS AT LONDON HEATHROW (LHR), CAPETOWN, & SINGAPORE.

NOW OWNED BY IMPERIAL HOLDINGS LTD (100%).

MAY 2001: 3 ORDERS (2001-08) ATR 72-500'S, FOR LEASE TO JET AIRWAYS (JPL).

JUNE 2001: HUGH FLYNN (CEO) AIR CONTRACTORS (HCA), RESIGNS TO RETURN TO SOUTH AFRICA TO HEAD SAFAIR (SFA).

AUGUST 2001: MD-82 (48020) SOLD TO WELLS FARGO.

SEPTEMBER 2001: 310 EMPLOYEES.

727-230 (20792) LEASED TO COMAIR (CML) FOR OPERATIONS BY "kulula.com" TO CAPE TOWN.

APRIL 2002: 352 EMPLOYEES.

(TELEPHONE: +27 (11) 928 0000). (FAX: +27 (11) 395 1314).

OWNERS: NATIONAL AIRWAYS (67%); AIR CONTRACTORS (HCA) (49%).

MAIN BASE: JOHANNESBURG - JAN SMUTS INTERNATIONAL (JNB).

HUBS: CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL (CPT); SINGAPORE CHANGI (SIN).

November 2002: 727-230 (ZS-NVR) wet-leased to United Nations (UN).

December 2002: 2 737-236's (670-21892, ZS-SIN; 669-21891, ZS-SIS), returned from South African Airways (SAA), leased to Comair (CML).

March 2003: 727-225F (825-20382, ZS-OPC), bought from Air Contractors (HCA).

April 2003: 737-230 (701-22116, ZS-SIP), returned from South African Airways (SAA), leased to Comair (CML).

May 2003: 737-236 (697-21805, ZS-SIR), returned from South African Airways (SAA), leased to Comair (CML).

July 2003: 2 MD-82's (48019, ZS-OBF; 48059, ZS-OBH), ex-Air Lib (ALB), wet-leased to Macedonian Airlines (MCC).

August 2003: 2 MD-82's (1135-49115, ZS-OBK; 1182-49164, ZS-OBL), returned from Air Lib (ALB).

October 2003: 727-294 (156-22044) sold to Air Mauritanie (MAR).

February 2004: See attached link to Leasing Survey 2004, which shows Safair (SFA) ranked 34th of the top 40 Airplane leasing companies with 8 narrow bodies and 5 wide bodies.

March 2004: Acquires 5 Hercules L-100-30's from TransAfrik (TCL).

May 2004: 727-223F (JT8D) (705-20183, ZS-OPT), bought from Air Contractors (HCA).

June 2004: 737-236 (21790) returned from South African Airways (SAA) and leased to Air Namibia (NAM).

July 2004: Safair (SFA) acquires 60% of Naturelink Charters (NRK) (http://www.naturelink.co.za), which provides inclusive air charter and air tour services in South Africa.

737-236 (21792) returned from South African Airways (SAA) and leased to Naturelink Charters (NRK).

August 2004: 737-236 (697-21805, ZS-SIR), wet-leased to Trans Air Congo (TSG).

October 2004: 737-236 (22026, ZS-SIU), wet-leased to Gambia International (GMB).

February 2005: 727-277F (22644), ex-Swiftair (SWF).

June 2005: 360 employees.

2 737-244's (22580, OB-1809-P; 22582, OB-1808-P) leased to (TANS) Peru (TAX).

September 2005: 737-236 (21802, ZS-SIN), wet-leased to Interlink Airlines (ITK).

October 2005: 737-236 (21801, HC-CFD), leased to Icaro Airlines (ICR), Ecuador.

February 2006: 737-236 (22026, HC-CFL), leased to Icaro Airlines (ICR), Ecuador.

March 2006: Based on an "Airline Business" magazine survey of airplane leasing companies, Safair Leasing (SFA) has a fleet of 9 airplanes valued at $230 million and is ranked 46th of the top 50 airplane leasing companies (see attached data).

July 2006: Safair (SFA) specializes in value-added jet airplane leasing and chartering as well as sale and leaseback transactions, contract operations and leasing services, flight crew leasing and training, airplane maintenance and modifications, aviation safety and medical training, material sales and operations support for navigation planning, flight planning and flight watch.

Employees = 509 (including 149 Flight Crew (FC); 32 Cabin Attendants (CA); & 25 Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

(IATA) Code: FA - 640. (ICAO) Code: SFR - CARGO.

Parent organization/shareholders: Imperial Holdings (100%).

Owns: Air Contractors (HCA) (49%); Naturelink Charters (NRK) (60%).

Main Base: Johannesburg International Airport (JNB).

August 2006: Comair (CML) (30%) and Safair (SFA) (70%) forms "Imperial Air Cargo (IMP)," using 727-230F (20757, ZS-NWA), 727-232F (20637, ZS-OBN), & HS 748-2B (1736, ZS-DBM), all 3 airplanes (SFA) leased. 2 727-230s (22116, ZS-SIP; 22119, ZS-OLC), sold to Interlink Airlines (ITK). 727-227F (21247, ZS-IAC), bought from Finova (GRB). 737-244 (22587, ZS-SIH), sold to InterAir South Africa (ITI).

December 2006: 2 737-244s (22586, ZS-SIG; 22596, ZS-SIL), wet-leased to ViaUganda (VCA) by Avistar Aviation.

January 2007: 737-244 (22582, ZS-SIC), delivery.

July 2008: Dublin-based Aergo Capital (CLJ) reached agreement to acquire the aviation assets of South African Imperial Holdings, comprising Safair (SFA) and Safair Lease Finance. Aergo (CLJ) currently has 65 commercial airplanes on its portfolio on lease to 20 carriers and will add 31 with the Safair (SFA) acquisition.

December 2008: Safair (SFA) has taken delivery of 23 ex-Alitalia (ALI) MD-82s owned by parent, AerGo Capital (CLJ). 4 were flown to (SFA)'s maintenance facility at Johannesburg, with the remainder stored at Upington Airport, until hangar space becomes available. The MD-82's are to be used for business opportunities in the Sub Sahara region. At least 2 will go to 1Time (1TA).

December 2009: Safair (SFA) has established a base in Nairobi, Kenya. (SFA) will base 3 airplanes at Wilson Airport and hopes to secure a number of contracts from Kenya Airways (KEN), whose owners include (KLM) and the United Nation's (UN)'s World Food Program. (SFA) will locate 2 737-300s and 1 Hercules in Nairobi.

Parent, Aergo Capital (CLJ) Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Fred Browne said "There is a lot of demand in Kenya and we would like to double the size of the business in the next 12 months." (CLJ) is involved in wet and dry leasing and also has shareholding in an airplane maintenance facility at Johannesburg International airport.

March 2011: Parent, Aergo Capital (CLJ) opened a new office in Johannesburg. (CLJ) said it plans to expand its operations in Africa, where it "already has a significant customer base." Former Safair (SFA) Operations (CEO) Christo Kok will head the office.

Safair (SFA) will shortly take delivery of its 1st ex-Olympic Airlines (OLY) 737-400F.

July 2012: Safair (SFA) has based 737-3YOF (23500, ZS-SMJ) at Libreville Leon M'Ba airport (LBV) after winning a (DHL) Express contract to operate cargo flights on behalf of the logistics provider.

2 737-4YOs (24917, ZS-JRD; 26065, ZS-JRE), ex-(N284AL & N285AL) for FlySafair operations.

September 2013: South African airplane lessor, Safair (SFA) is to launch a new low-cost carrier (LCC) in the domestic market next month.

Dubbed "FlySafair," the airline will offer up to 10 daily flights between Johannesburg and Cape Town utilizing 2 737-400s. Tickets will be on sale this month, and FlySafair (FSF) will be fully operational in the 4th quarter.

FlySafair (FSF) says it plans to add further domestic destinations. It will be based at OR Tambo Internatonal airport. (SFA)'s (CEO) Dave Andrew will also head up FlySafair (FSF).

Schedules data shows the Johannesburg - Cape Town route to be hotly contested, with Comair (CML), Lufthansa (DLH), Mango (MGO), and South African Airways (SAA) among the carriers operating in the market.

October 2013: South African low-cost carrier (LCC) FlySafair (FSF) is planning to launch 737-400 operations between Johannesburg and Cape Town on October 17.

FlySafair (FSF) is the newly created low-cost arm of South African ad hoc charter and services company Safair (SFA), which was formed in 1969. (SFA) is part of Ireland’s (ASL) Aviation Group, which also includes Irish cargo carrier, Air Contractors (HCA) and French 737 operator, Europe Airpost (EUE).

South Africa’s Air Service Licensing Council (ASLC) has approved (SFA)’s plans to launch domestic scheduled operations under the FlySafair brand. The start-up (LCC) plans to offer up to 10 daily flights between Johannesburg and Cape Town using 2 737-400s, with a 3rd on standby, before expanding into other routes.

Safair (SFA) (CEO) Dave Andrew said the launch of FlySafair (FSF) represents a “natural evolution of our business. We have no doubt that (FSF) will only serve to further grow the domestic market.”

According to local media reports, British Airways (BAB) franchise carrier Comair (CML) and low-cost start-up SkyWise have taken legal action against the (ASLC) in a bid block FlySafair (FSF)’s launch, claiming it does not meet the required South African ownership criteria. The (ASLC) has dismissed an initial challenge.

Safair (SFA) said it has a 75% South African shareholding; (ASL) owns the remaining 25%. “We’re committed to the launch of FlySafair (FSF) and are confident that the court will ratify what the (ASLC) has already approved,” FlySafair (FSF) said via its Twitter account.

SEE PHOTO - - "SFA-2013-10 - FLYSAFAIR 737-400."

Later, however, plans by South African low-cost carrier (LCC) FlySafair (which was scheduled to begin Boeing 737-400 operations between Johannesburg and Cape Town on October 17) were stymied by a legal challenge from its 2 competitors.

British Airways (BAB) franchise carrier, Comair (CML) and low-cost carrier (LCC) start-up SkyWise successfully blocked FlySafair from launching flights on grounds the new carrier failed to meet South African ownership regulations. These stipulate an airline must be at least 75% owned by South Africans, who must have effective control of the company.

Safair (SFA) says it has a 75% South African shareholding, with (ASL) owning the remaining 25%. However, the North Gauteng High Court issued an interim interdict that stops FlySafair from selling tickets or starting operations until a review can be conducted of the Air Services Licensing Council decision to grant it a scheduled services license. “Unfortunately and contrary to our expectations, the court has granted the interdict sought by our competitors,” FlySafair (CEO) Dave Andrew said.

“Our board is therefore currently considering all available options as we remain dedicated to the launch of FlySafair. We are taking every step to ensure that the [Air Services Licensing] Council’s decision is duly confirmed.”

In a twist to the judgment, the court accepted an offer by plaintiff Comair (CML) to accommodate FlySafair’s passengers by honoring their ticket prices and dates of travel. As FlySafair’s ticket prices are lower than (CML)’s, this will mean it has to fly passengers at a loss. “It’s obviously not ideal,” a spokeswoman for (CML) said.

“Comair (CML) welcomes competition in the South African aviation market, as evidenced by the fact that (CML) did not object to the recent SkyWise license application, but strongly believes that our market should not be exposed to exploitation by foreign-owned airlines, (CML) (CEO) Erik Venter said. “More importantly, we believe that the economic value of South Africa’s air space and the image and sustainability of our industry should be protected.”

April 2014: South African low-cost carrier (LCC) FlySafair has been granted a domestic air service license after rivals blocked its planned October 2013 launch at the last minute on ownership grounds.

FlySafair planned to begin up to 10 daily 737-400 flights between Johannesburg and Cape Town on October 17, 2013, but British Airways (BAB) franchise carrier, Comair (CML) and (LCC) startup SkyWise blocked the launch with a legal challenge.

Local ownership regulations state an airline must be at least 75% owned by South Africans, who must have effective control of the company. At the time, parent company Safair (SFA, which itself is part of Ireland’s (ASL) Aviation Group, insisted it had a 75% South African shareholding with (ASL) holding the remaining 25%.

However, FlySafair said it has been granted a domestic scheduled passenger license by the Air Services Licensing Council (ASLC) after revamping its ownership structure. “FlySafair has restructured its shareholding, getting rid of the shareholding that caused the problems, and at the same time, concluding the largest employee share ownership scheme in the aviation industry, effectively giving its South African employees a 25.14% stake in the company.”

(SFA), which was founded in 1969 as an ad-hoc charter and services company, has held international and domestic unscheduled licenses for nearly 50 years. The company retained the staff it hired for the FlySafair launch by using them within the existing business.

“This demonstrates our commitment not only to job creation, but also sends a clear message that FlySafair is here for the long run. We are eager to provide South Africans with an alternate (LCC) airline that is dedicated to offering competitive and sustainable fares between Johannesburg and Cape Town,” (SFA) (CEO) Dave Andrew said.

Andrew added that a new launch date is under consideration and will be announced later. FlySafair originally planned to launch its initial Cape Town service using 2 737-400s, with a 3rd on standby, before expanding into other routes.

August 2014: News Item A-1: A significant aviation anniversary occurred on August 23, 2014; it recognized it had been 60 years since the 1st flight of the legendary Lockheed Hercules airplane as of that date. This year already witnessed another significant 60th anniversary flight: on July 15, that of the "367-80" prototype of the 707. While the Boeing (TBC) product beat the Lockheed to the skies by over a month, the “Herc” has a distinction that the 707 (and the closely-related C/KC-135) cannot match: it’s still in production now.

Indeed, >2500 have been ordered to date, according to Lockheed Martin (LM)'s website, with 2,471 deliveries as of July of this year. (LM) notes that “Since its debut, the C-130 Hercules has exhibited a combination of rugged tenacity, unmatched flexibility and continuous innovation, that continue to make it the global airlifter choice”. A particular distinction not shared by many airplane types is the fact that it has operated from all 7 continents, including Antarctica.

OK, so what does this have to do with the world of airlines? While not widely noticed in many quarters of the air transport world, there is a civil variant of the Hercules, the L-100. To date, there have been 115 delivered, with 55 still in service globally. In 1959, both Pan American (PAA) and all-cargo carrier, Slick Airways had ordered what was initially termed a “Super” Hercules for airline freighter services. These were later cancelled, which led to the development of the present L-100.

A prototype was built, and 1st flew on April 20, 1964. Type certification occurred in February 1965, with 1st delivery (out of an initial group of 21 airplanes) to Continental Air Services in September of 1965. The initial airplane was leased briefly to Alaska Airlines (ASA), and then returned to its Marietta, Georgia birthplace to be “stretched” into the longer L-100-20 model. This provided more cubic capacity, which was desirable for most airlines, whose loads were typically not as heavy as those of the military.

A number of customers from locations around the world, acquired the new civil freight type, and placed it into service during the 1960s. While many were ‘real’ airlines, there are also were a number of L-100s delivered to governmental agencies in a variety of countries outside the USA (which, of course, has long been the largest operator of the C-130) for a variety of government-sponsored but non-military duties. Indonesia even converted two of its airplanes to haul passengers, as part of the country’s Transmigration program, which required the installation of a modest number of additional windows in the fuselage.

Both Alaska Airlines (ASA) (where the prototype airplane was leased for a demonstration in 1965) and Delta (DAL), also based in the Atlanta metropolitan area, like Lockheed-Georgia, where the Hercules family was built, acquired L-100s in 1966. (DAL) replaced its fleet of C-46 piston-engined freighters with the Hercs; don’t let anyone try to talk you into the oft-repeated story that (DAL) never acquired turboprops new from the manufacturer! Interestingly, all of the (DAL) airplanes were later stretched to the Dash 20 model; what had been (DAL) ship 301 was later converted to the Dash 30 model (a further stretch) after being sold to Saturn.

More specialized USA cargo operators Airlift, Alaska International, Saturn (later merged into Trans International Airlines) and Southern Air Transport (SOF) also acquired L-100s. Pacific Western of Canada was another North American airline customer. During the 1980s, American Airlines (AAL) experimented with using the L-100 as a feeder airplane from Caribbean points to San Juan, Puerto Rico, in conjunction with its fleet of 747F freighters, but the airplanes were operated by Transamerica, the successor to Trans International.

Eventually, the L-100-30 became the standard, with the last one being delivered in 1992. Over the years, Lockheed looked at a number of different variants, including the L-100-50. This “Super-Stretched” version was targeted at The Flying Tiger Line, then the largest USA scheduled service, all-cargo airline, but this did not come to fruition. Neither did a twin-engine version, the L-400. A proposed 260 inch stretch of the L-100-30 was looked at seriously in the early 1980s, but didn’t make it to market, either.

However, after a hiatus of many years, it now appears that there will again be newly-built airline Hercs. On July 16, the (ASL) Aviation Group, based in Dublin, Ireland, announced that it had signed a Letter of Intent (LOI) to order up to 10 LM-100J commercial freighters (based on the current production ‘J’ model of the C-130). These are intended to replace the 9 L-100s at (ASL)’s subsidiary, Safair (SFA), in South Africa. Thus, it looks very likely that there will be L-100s flying on the 70th and 80th anniversaries of the C-130’s 1st flight.

News Item A-2: South African start-up FlySafair is planning to launch services on October 16, a year later than planned, after its rivals blocked its 2013 launch at the last minute on ownership grounds.

(IATA) Code: FA. (ICAO) Code: SFR.

Cape Town-based, FlySafair (SFR) originally planned to launch October 17, 2013, but was thwarted by a legal challenge by British Airways (BAB) franchise carrier Comair (CML) and low-cost start-up SkyWise.

FlySafair (SFR), which has since revamped its ownership structure, secured its domestic scheduled passenger license earlier this year and has now put tickets back on sale, with a view to a mid-October launch.

It will deploy 2 Boeing 737-400s on routes from Cape Town to Johannesburg and Port Elizabeth, with fares starting at R399/$37, inclusive of taxes and two items of hand luggage. Checked baggage, seat selection and catering will be charged as ancillaries.

“Despite FlySafair (SFR) not having been operational since August 2013 and not making any revenue since it was temporarily shut down, the airline retained the services of all 68 employees who were hired almost a year ago. This demonstrates (SFR)’s commitment not only to job creation, but also sends a clear message that the carrier is here to stay,” the airline said.

Safair (SFA)/(SFA), which was founded in 1969 as an ad-hoc charter and services company, has held international and domestic unscheduled licenses for nearly 50 years. “We like to think of ourselves as South Africa’s oldest, newest airline,” it said.

October 2014: FlySafair ((IATA) Code: FA, based at Johannesburg O R Tambo) (SFA) successfully launched operations on Thursday, October 16 with multiple daily flights between Cape Town and Johannesburg O R Tambo. Operations are on-board 2 737-400s with services to Port Elizabeth are also on the cards.

The launch date is almost 1 year to the day after (SFA) (LCC) was originally meant to have launched. Just prior to its original October 17, 2013 launch date, rivals Comair (South Africa) ((IATA) Code: MN, based at Johannesburg O R Tambo) (CML) and SkyWise ( (IATA) Code: SW, based at Johannesburg O R Tambo) successfully applied for an interdict against FlySafair (SFA) in the North Gauteng High Court, claiming (SFA) did not meet the requirement of 75% local ownership.

Since then, (SFA) has restructured its ownership by excluding former shareholders, while choosing a South African-registered holding company as another shareholder. It has also entered into a Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) deal with its employees.

November 2014: FlySafair (SFA), the latest start-up low-cost carrier (LCC) based in South Africa that commenced operations on October 16th, continued to expand with the addition of its 3rd route on November 13th, this time from its Cape Town (CPT) hub to George (GRJ). The new 352 km domestic sector will be served daily, utilizing the airline’s 165-seat 737-400s. South African Airways (SAA) is already flying this route with 24x-weekly flights.

December 2014: Safair ((IATA) Code: FA, based at Johannesburg O R Tambo) (SFA) parent, the (ASL) Aviation Group (ASL), has completed its acquisition of Swiss-based aviation group, the Farnair Group, bringing FarAir Europe (TUL), Farnair Switzerland, Farnair Hungary, India's Quikjet, and Thailand's K-Mile Air (KMI) into (ASL)'s fold.

“With 5 airlines operating across Europe and Africa and with an airline now in each of South East Asia and India, (ASL) Aviation will considerably strengthen its position as the neutral provider of airline services to the major express integrators on a global scale,” (ASL) Aviation Group (CEO) Hugh Flynn said. “With strong management, a constant focus on costs, and a total commitment to customer service, we have remained profitable and have grown throughout the last few years of recession.”

The 3 additional subsidiaries include specialist service providers in airplane handling, training and rail logistics.

The Farnair Group management will remain in place, while the addition of its fleet will bring the total (ASL) Aviation Group fleet to >100 owned and/or operated airplanes.

For its part, (ASL) Aviation also oversees Europe Airpost ((IATA) Code: 5O, based at Paris (CDG)) (EUE) and Air Contractors ((IATA) Code: AG, based at Dublin International) (HCA).

October 2015: FlySafair (SFA) launched 4 new routes on October 25, which link both Durban (DUR) and East London (ELS) to Cape Town (CPT) and Johannesburg (JNB). All of the services launched will operate with at least a daily rotation, and be flown by the low cost carrier (LCC)’s 737-400s, of which (SFA) currently operates 5, with a 737-800 having also recently joined the fleet. All 4 city pairs will face direct competition, most notably by South African Airways (SAA), which competes on 3 of the 4 sectors. With the addition of Durban and East London, (FlySafair now operates to 6 South African airports along with George and Port Elizabeth.

Routes:
Cape Town (CPT) to Durban (DUR) 737-400 12x-, vs Mango (MGO) 42x-, Comair (CML) 30x-, and South African Airways (SAA) 12x-, to East London (ELS) 737-400 7x-, vs SA Express 31x-; Johannesburg (JNB) to (DUR) 737-400 14x-, vs (SAA) 90x-, (CML) 35x-, kulula.com (KUL) 13x-.

February 2016: Safair (SFA) (CEO) Elmar Conradie has been quoted in the South African press as saying that his company would be interested in acquiring South African Airways (SAA)'s low-cost carrier Mango Airlines (MGO) from the South African government if the price was right. Conradie's interest is linked to recent statements by South Africa's Finance Minister, Pravin Gordhan that the government should no longer continue to financially support all of its 4 government owned carriers, (SAA), Mango (MGO), South African Express (XZ, Johannesburg O R Tambo) and Airlink (South Africa) (4Z, Johannesburg O R Tambo).

Safair (SFA)'s scheduled low cost carrier (LCC) unit FlySafair ((IATA) Code: FA, based at Johannesburg O R Tambo) currently operates 3 737-400s and 3 737-800s on domestic services from Johannesburg and Cape Town to Durban King Shaka, East London, George, and Port Elizabeth as well as on South Africa's key route linking Johannesburg and Cape Town.

Mango (MGO) currently operates 9 737-800s and 1 737-300 wet-leased from Star Air (South Africa) ((ICAO) Code: BRH, based at Johannesburg O R Tambo) on a predominantly domestic network with 1 international service from Johannesburg to Zanzibar.

The 2 carriers also compete with Comair (South Africa) (CML), low-cost carrier (LCC) unit Kulula Air (KUL).

2 737-4YOs (24917, ZS-JRD; 26065, ZS-JRE) ferried to Miami for cargo conversion.

December 2017: Lufthansa Technik (DLH) (LTK) will provide maintenance and overhaul support on (CFM56-7B) engines operated by Mango Airlines (MGO), the low cost carrier (LCC) subsidiary of South African Airways (SAA).

The agreement runs until 2022 and will see work carried out by (DLH) (LTK) at its engine shops in Germany, with the main location at its Hamburg headquarters. It includes at least 19 overhaul events over the duration of the contract, with billing conducted on a power-by-the-hour basis.

(DLH) (LTK) has previously worked with (MGO)’s parent airline group, having carried out (SAA) (CFM56-7B) work for >15 years.

Aside from agreements with (SAA) and its South African Technical division, it also holds partnerships with Comair (CML) and FlySafair (SFA) in the country.

Robert Gaag, Lufthansa Technik’s VP Corporate Sales Europe, Middle East & Africa, said the new agreement is a boost for the company in the Africa region, estimated to have a 3% (MRO) market share from next year up to 2027 by Aviation Week's 2018 Fleet & MRO Forecast. “(DLH) (LTK) has a long lasting presence in this region and this agreement is a further proof that our services can be tailor-made to the different needs of this market,” he said.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
SFA-727-230
SFA-737-33A-2010-04
SFA-737-400 -2013-10
SFA-737-844 and 737-46M- 2015-10.jpg

December 2017:

0 707-323C (JT3D-3) (619-19519, /67 9G-AYO), (CES) LST (PED) 1996-01.

1 727-23F (JT8D-7B) (218-19131, /66 ZS-NPX), OPS BY XPS RENNIES FAST FREIGHT. FREIGHTER.

0 727-100 (JT8D), 6 RTND (CSV).

1 727-2Q4 (JT8D) (1683-22424, /80 OO-DHZ), EX-(TBL)/(AGJ), LST (EPT) 1997-02.

1 727-223F (JT8D-7B HK) (705-20183,/69 ZS-OPT), BF (HCA) 2004-05. FREIGHTER.

1 727-225F (JT8D) (825-20382, /70 ZS-OPC), EX-(EAL)/(AAV), RF (HCA) 1998-07, LST (DHL) EUROPE. RF (HCA) 2003-03. FREIGHTER.

1 727-227F (JT8D-9A HK) (1217-21247, /76 ZS-IAC), BF (GRB) 2006-08. IMPERIAL AIR CARGO LSD 2011-03. FREIGHTER.

3 727-230 (JT8D-15) (922-20673, /73 ZS-NVR; 1023-20792, /74 ZS-NZV; 1433-21623 /79 ZS-OBO; 1176-21113, /75 ZS-NOU, LST (CML) 1994-11; 1178-21114, /75 ZS-NOV, LST (CML) 1994-12), 1 TO (ITI), 5 TO (CML), 20673 ST (CML) 1999-07, 21113 PARTED OUT 2005-03. 20792; & 21623; LST (UN) IN ALL WHITE COLORS. 155Y.

2 727-230 (JT8D-15) (22116, ZS-SIP; 22119, ZS-OLC), BOTH ST (ITK) 2006-07.

1 727-230F (JT8D-15) (1002-20757, /74 ZS-NWA), LST IMPERIAL AIR CARGO (IMP) 2006-08. FREIGHTER.

1 727-232F (JT8D-15 HK) (920-20637, /73 ZS-OBN), EX-(EOI), WET-LST (CRP), LST (SAA) CARGO/(DHL). LST IMPERIAL AIR CARGO (IMP) 2006-08. FREIGHTER.

1 727-277F (JT8D-15 HK) (1753-22644), EX-(SWF) 2005-02. FREIGHTER.

1 727-281F (JT8D-7B HK) (865-20466, /71 ZS-PDL), EX-(ANA)/(PSS), RF (HCA) 1998-07, LST (DHL) EUROPE (DHK). FREIGHTER.

0 727-294 (JT8D-17) (1561-22044, ZS-OBM), (QTA) LSD, LST (OMR) 1999-08, ST (MAR) 2003-10. 16F, 119Y.

1 737-2L9 (JT8D-17) (550-21686, /79 ZS-OKF), EX-(MRS)/(CML), LST (NAM) 2000-11. RF (NAM) 2001-07. 20C, 87Y.

1 737-230 (JT8D-15) (701-22116, /81 ZS-SIP), EX-(DLH)/(ASM)/(CRH), LST (SAA) 2000-11, RF (SAA), LST (CML) 2003-04. RF (CML). 110Y.

1 737-230 (JT8D-15) (714-22119, /81 ZS-OLC), EX-(DLH)/(CRH), LST (CML) 2000-06. 110Y.

1 737-236 (JT8D-15A) (599-21790, /79 ZS-SIT; 628-21792, /80 ZS-SIO), LST (SAA) 2000-10; (644-22026, /80 ZS-SIU, 2001-01), LST (SAA) 669-21801, /80 ZS-SIS; 670-21802, /80 ZS-SIN), 2000-09, EX-(LAN) (21801 LST (SAA) 2001-02; 21891; 21892; RF (SAA), LST (CML) 2002-12, 21805 RF (SAA), LST (CML) 2003-05. 21790 RF (SAA), LST (NAM) 2004-06. 21792 RF (SAA) LST NATURELINK CHARTER (NRK) 2004-07. 21805 RF (CML), LST (TSG) 2004-08. 22026 WET-LST (GMB) 2004-10. 21802; LST (ITK) 2005-09. (SZ-SIO) WET-LST (SAA) EXPRESS 2005-10. 21801; LST (ICR) 2005-10. 22026; LST (ICR) 2006-02. 21805; LST (NAM) 2006-02. 21792; RETIRED 2008-09. 20C, 87Y.

1 737-244 (JT8D-17A), EX-(SAA), LST (SAA) 66 MTHS 2000-06, 22590 WET-LST (ABF) 2004-07. 22580; 805-22582, ZS-SIC; LST (TAX) 2005-06. 22589; RF (SAA) 2005-03. 22587; ST (ITI) 2006-08. 22586; 22591; WET-LST (VCA) 2006-12. 22591, ZS-SIL LST (AML); RTND 2013-02. 20C, 87Y.

2 737-244F (JT8D-17A) (809-22583, /81 ZS-SID "ORANJE;" 828-22585, /81 ZS-SIF), SOUTH AFRICAN CARGO LSD 2000-06. FREIGHTER.

1 737-25A (JT8D-15A) (1422-23790, /87 V5-ANA), EX-(MID), LST (NAM) 2000-09, 20C, 87Y.

1 737-3B3QC (CFM56-3B1) (1693-24387, /89 ZS-ASL), UN TITLES. 2011-05. 147Y.

2 737-3YOSF (CFM56-3B1) (1242-23499, /86 ZS-SMG; 1243-23500, /86 ZS-SMJ), ALL WHITE COLORS. 2009-09. FREIGHTER.

2 737-33A (CFM56-3B1) (1283-23625, /86 ZS-SMH; 1423-23634, /87 5Y-BXL), AERGO (CGL) LSD 2010-01. 8F, 126Y.

1 737-4Q8 (CFM56-3) (25096, ZS-JRK) IN SPRINGBOK NATIONAL RUGBY TEAM COLORS.

2 737-4YOF (CFM56-3C1) (24917, ZS-JRD; 26065, ZS-JRE), EX-(N284AL & N285AL), 2013-07 FOR FLYSAFAIR OPS. BOTH AIRPLANES FERRIED TO MIAMI 2016-02 FOR CARGO CONVERSION. FREIGHTER.

1 737-436 (CFDM56-3C1) (2147-25305, /91 ZS-OTF; 2197-25840, /92 ZS-OTG), RF (BAB) 2001-11. 25305; RTND. 43C, 84Y.

1 737-436 (CFM56-3C1) (2222-25841, ZS-OTH), LST (CML) 2002-11. 147Y.

1 737-46M (CFM56-3C1) (26550, ZR-JRL - SEE PHOTO - "SFA-737-46M - 2015-11").

10 ORDERS 737-700 (CFM56-7B24):

1 737-844 (CFM56-7B) (32631, ZS-SJR - SEE PHOTO - "SFA-737-844 - 2015-11"), EX-(MGO). IN SPRINGBOK NATIONAL RUGBY TEAM COLORS 2017-03.

2 MD-81 (JT8D-217C) (48016; 48018), EX-(AUL), LST (SPR), 164Y.

2 MD-82 (JT8D-217C) (1001-48019, /81; 1045-48020, /81; 1047-48059, /82; ST WELLS FARGO 8/01, LST (ALB) 2000-01), (48020, EX-(SUQ), RF (DIR). 48019; 48059; WET-LST (MCC) 2003-07. RF (MCC) 2004-06. EX-(AUL), 159Y.

1 MD-82 (JT8D-217C) (1078-48021, /83), EX-(SPR), LST (CML) 2005-02. 150Y.

1 MD-82 (JT8D-217C) (1135-49115, /84 ZS-OBK; 1182-49164, ZS-OBL), EX-(AUL), 5 YR LST (ALB) 2000-10. RF (ALB) 2003-08. 49164; RETIRED 2008-09. 157Y.

23 MD-82 (JT8D-217C) (1126-49192; 1127-49193; 1136-49195; 1143-49199; 1147-49200; 1189-49201; 1170-49202; 1174-49203; 1179-49204; 1184-49205; 1188-49206; 1189-49207; 1192-49210; 1202-49211; 1428-49433; 1446-49434; 1544-49549; 1600-49794; 1713-49796; 1719-49969; 1737-49970; 1755-49971; 1757-49972), BF (ALI) BY AERGO (CLJ) 2008-12.

1 MD-83 (JT8D-219) (1464-49617, /88 ZS-OPZ), 2006-02. LST (1TA). 157Y.

1 MD-83 (JT8D-219) (1736-53012, /90 ZS-OPX), IN ALL WHITE COLORS WITH NO TITLES. 150Y.

1 MD-83 (JT8D-219) (2047-49966, /93 ZS-SKB), QUAGGA/ZEBRA COLORS, LST (1TA). 157Y.

1 B AE 146-100F (E2314, ZS-ASX), 2008-02, EX-(N506XJ).

1 B AE 146-200QC.

1 HS 748-2B (1736, ZS-DBM), LST IMPERIAL AIR CARGO (IMP) 2006-08. FREIGHTER.

9 L-100-382 HERCULES (501-D22A) (4208, /67 ZS-ORA; 4248, /67 ZS-ORB; 4388, /70 ZS-ORC; 4475, /72 ZS-RSC; 4562, /74 ZS-RSF; 4565, /74 ZS-RSG; 4600, /75 ZS-RSI; 4673, ZS-JIV), 1 LST (FED) 2000-10, 4475 LST (HCA) 2000-08. 4676 LST (HCA)/(DHL) 2001-08. 4673 LST (HCA) 2002-11. 4684, 2006-01. (3 ON LEASE), (4676 RF (SCH)). FREIGHTER.

1 L-100-30 HERCULES (69C-5027), EX-(BEJ) 1999-05.

1 ATR 72-202 (207, F-GPOB), LST (FPO) 2000-06.

3 ATR 72-500 (PW127F) (674, /01 VT-JCF; 679, /01 VT-JCG; 681, /01 VT-JCH), LST (JPL) 2001-08. 64Y.

Management:
(definitions)

RALPH BOETTGER, CHAIRMAN.

ELMAR CONRADIE, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO) SAFAIT (SFA).

DAVE ANDREW, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER (CEO).

CAPTAIN GERHARDUS WESSELS, DIRECTOR FLIGHT OPERATIONS (JNBOOFA) (wwessels@safair.co.za).

TERTIUS VAN JAARSVELD, DIRECTOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT.

ELMAR CONRADIE, DIRECTOR FINANCE.

DAVID ANDREW, DIRECTOR MARKETING & COMMERCIAL.

FREDERICK DAVIDSON, DIRECTOR TECHNICAL.

WIMPIE DAVIDSON, EXECUTIVE MANAGER TECHNICAL, (JNBOOFA)
(safair@mail.0800.co.za) (wdavidson@safair.co.za).

RIAAN WANDRAG, SENIOR MANAGER QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) & ENGINEERING (CHIEF DEPUTY INSPECTOR).

N BRUTON, SENIOR MANAGER AVIATION SAFETY (JNBOOFA)
(safair@mail.0800.co.za) (nbruton@safair.co.za).

 
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