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Airlines

Name: SUDAN AIRWAYS
7JetSet7 Code: SUD
Status: Operational
Region: AFRICA
City: KHARTOUM
Country: SUDAN
Employees 1900
Web: sudanair.com
Email: info@sudanair.com
Telephone: +249183 243 731
Fax: +249183 243 717
Sita: KRTFFSD
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
SUD-2004-01 - NEWS
SUD-2005-01-UPDATE-A
SUD-2005-01-UPDATE-B
SUD-2005-01-UPDATE-C
SUD-2005-01-UPDATE-D
SUD-CABIN ATTENDANT
SUD-LOGO

FORMED IN 1946 AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 1947. GOVERNMENT OWNED. DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL, SCHEDULED & CHARTER, PASSENGER, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
4TH FLOOR, SDC BUILDING, N0 3
NEW EXTENSION, STREET 19
KHARTOUM, SUDAN

ADDRESS:
PO BOX 253
KHARTOUM, SUDAN

SUDAN (THE REPUBLIC OF THE SUDAN) WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1956, IT COVERS AN AREA OF 2,505,813 SQ KM, ITS POPULATION IS 28.5 MILLION, ITS CAPITAL CITY IS KHARTOUM, AND ITS OFFICIAL LANGUAGE IS ARABIC.

Location: Northern Africa, bordering the Red Sea, between Egypt and Eritrea.
Geographic coordinates: 15 00 N, 30 00 E.
Map references: Africa.
Area: 2,505,810 sq km.
Area comparative: Slightly more than one-quarter the size of the USA.
Land boundaries: 7,687 km.
Border Countries: Central African Republic 1,165 km, Chad 1,360 km, Democratic Republic of the Congo 628 km, Egypt 1,273 km, Eritrea 605 km, Ethiopia 1,606 km, Kenya 232 km, Libya 383 km, Uganda 435 km
Coastline: 853 km.
Climate: Tropical in South; Arid desert in North; Rainy season (April to October).
Terrain: Generally flat, Featureless plain; Mountains in East and West.
Elevation extremes: Lowest point - Red Sea 0 m. Highest point: Kinyeti 3,187 m.
Natural resources: Petroleum; Small reserves of iron ore, copper, chromium ore, zinc, tungsten, mica, silver, gold.
Irrigated land: 19,460 sq km (1993 est.).
Natural hazards: Dust storms.
Geography Note: Largest country in Africa; Dominated by the Nile and its tributaries.
Population: 34,475,690.
Age structure:
0-14 years: 45% (male 7,941,909; female 7,614,225).
15-64 years: 53% (male 9,094,712; female 9,061,194).
65 years and over: 2% (male 423,389; female 340,261).
Population Growth Rate: 2.71%.
Birth Rate: 39.34 births/1,000 population.
Death Rate: 10.6 deaths/1,000 population.
Net Migration Rate: -1.68 migrant(s)/1,000 population.
Sex Ratio:
At Birth: 1.05 male(s)/female.
Under 15 years: 1.04 male(s)/female.
15-64 years: 1 male(s)/female.
65 years and over: 1.24 male(s)/female.
Total population: 1.03 male(s)/female.
Infant Mortality Rate: 70.94 deaths/1,000 live births.
Life expectancy at birth:
Total Population: 56.4 years.
Male: 55.41 years.
Female: 57.44 years.
Total Fertility Rate: 5.58 children born/woman.
Nationality:
Noun: Sudanese (singular and plural).
Adjective: Sudanese.
Ethnic groups: Black 52%, Arab 39%, Beja 6%, Foreigners 2%, Other 1%
Religions: Sunni Muslim 70%, Indigenous Beliefs 25%, Christian 5%.
Languages: Arabic, Nubian, Ta Bedawie, Nilotic, Nilo-Hamitic, Sudanic languages, English.
Country Name:
Conventional Long Form: Republic of the Sudan.
Conventional Short Form: Sudan.
Local Long Form: Jumhuriyat as-Sudan.
Local Short Form: As-Sudan.
Former: Anglo-Egyptian Sudan.
Government Type: Transitional.
Capital: Khartoum.
Administrative Divisions: 26 States.
Independence: 1 January 1956.
National Holiday: Independence Day, 1 January.
Legal System: Based on English Common Law and Islamic Law.
Flag Description:
Three equal horizontal bands of red, white, and black with a green isosceles triangle based on the hoist side.

APRIL 1996: RETURNED A300-600 TO LESSOR.

JULY 1996: 737-200 STILL IN HANGAR FOR "D/2" MAINTENANCE CHECK.

JUNE 1997: 1 A310-222 (318), EX-SABENA (SAB), AIRBUS (AIFS) 3 MONTH LEASED.

JULY 1997: 1 A310-222 (JT9D-7R4E1) RETURNED TO AIRBUS (EDS).

SEPTEMBER 1997: 1 A310-300 (552) SOLD TO VASP (VSP).

CUTS INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS -30%, & DOMESTIC -20%, DUE TO SHORTAGE OF FUEL.

MARCH 1998: ALL 707'S GROUNDED SINCE NOVEMBER 1997. 707-3J8C (20898) IS IN "D/2" MAINTENANCE CHECK, & MODIFICATIONS. LACK OF SPARE PARTS & MONEY, PLUS SANCTIONS PREVENT NECESSARY WORK BEING COMPLETED. LEASED A 707 FROM MAHFOOZ AVIATION (BMV), WHILE AIRPLANES GROUNDED.

APRIL 1998: 2,362 EMPLOYEES.

JUNE 1998: A300B4-622R (252) RETURNED TO LESSOR.

JULY 1998: NEW, $750 MILLION INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, BEING BUILT 12.5 MILES NORTHEAST OF KHARTOUM.

TO JUBA (2/WEEK).

ACCDT: (SUD) 737-2J8C (21170) DESTROYED WRITTEN OFF (W/O) IN LANDING OVERRUN, AT KHARTOUM.

OCTOBER 1998: 1 A300-622R (PW4158) (530), EX-KOREAN AIR (KAL), AIRBUS (EDS) 15 YEAR LEASED. RETURNED A310-200 (278) TO (EDS) (TO FEDEX (FED) SEPTEMBER 1999).

FEBRUARY 1999: OPERATES AIR DJIBOUTI (DJB) A310-222 (F-OHPQ) TO SHARJAH. 1 727-251 (19973, C5-SMM), EX-NIGERIA AIRLINES (NIA), MAHFOOZ (BMV) LEASED .

APRIL 1999: 2,362 EMPLOYEES. SITA: KRTEVSD.

JUNE 1999: TO BE PARTIALLY PRIVATIZED. SELLING ITS MINORITY SHARES.

AUGUST 1999: A300B4-605R (505) DELIVERY, AIRBUS (EDS) LEASED.

SEPTEMBER 1999: RESUMES FLIGHTS TO ADDIS ABABA AFTER 4 YEARS.

NOVEMBER 1999: 1998 = +$78.5 MILLION (NET PROFIT). STARTS TO PRIVATIZE.

DECEMBER 1999: 1 IL-18D (184007405, T9-ABB), PHOENIX LEASED.

APRIL 2000: 2,362 EMPLOYEES.

JULY 2000: TO LAGOS.

OCTOBER 2000: A310-300 (418) RETURNED TO CREDIT AGRICOLE, SOLD TO FRENCH AIR FORCE (FAF). DISCUSSING A300 MAINTENANCE CONTRACT WITH (GAMCO) (GUL).

DECEMBER 2000: 1 A300B4-605R (505, F-OIHB), RETURNED TO (AIFS), LEASED TO TUNISAIR (TUN).

MAY 2001: 1 A300B4-622R (530, F-OIHA), RETURNED TO AIRBUS (EDS).

OCTOBER 2001: 1 737-4Q8 (25375, TC-ANH), AIR ANATOLIA (TOI) WET-LEASED.

JANUARY 2002: 1 727, ALFA AFRICA LEASED, AND 1 737-400, TURKISH AIRLINES (THY) LEASED.

APRIL 2002: SITA: KRTDDSD. (http://www.sudanair.com).

A300B4-203 (127) RETURNED TO AIR ANATOLIA (TOI).

JULY 2002: 2001 = +$4.8 MILLION (NET PROFIT).

A300B4-103 (46, TC-ANI), (GEF) LEASED, AIR ANATOLIA (TOI) WET-LEASED.

October 2002: 1 An-24RV (67310505, RA-47318), ex-Air Djibouti (DJB), Aerokuzbass leased. 2 737-2H3's (22624, TS-IOE; 22625, TS-IOF), Tunisair (TUN) wet-leased.

November 2002: 1 L-1011-100 (1231, 9L-LDC), Air Universal (UVL) wet-leased.

December 2002: A300B4-203 (127, /80 TC-FLA), Fly Air (FLM) wet-leased.

February 2003: AN-24T (9911102, EK-49275), 48Y, Armenian (ARQ) wet-leased.

April 2003: 1,900 employees. (info@sudanair.com).

SITA: KRTEVSD.

May 2003: 757-27BER (24136, TC-FLC), Fly Air (FLM) wet-leased.

July 2003: ACCDT: (SUD) 737-2J8C (21169, ST-AFK) crashed shortly after takeoff (into an empty field, 3 miles from the airport, after the Captain reported engine trouble) from Port Sudan (headed for Khartoum) = 11 (FC) - (CA)/104 passenger fatalities of 11/105 (one 2-year old boy survived, who lost a leg in the accident).

August 2003: Sudan signed an agreement with the Saudi Khuzah Investment & Financial Consultancies Company to set up an aviation company with a capital of $500 million, with the Sudanese Ministry of Aviation holding 40%. The company will modernize Khartoum and other Sudanese airports and would add 15 new passenger airplanes within 3 months.

757-256 (TC-FLD), ex-National (NAB), FlyAir (FLM) wet-leased.

September 2003: A310-222 (357, JY-JAV), Jordan Aviation (JOR) wet-leased.

October 2003: 1 A300B4-120 (079, TC-OYC "HAKAN"), 289Y, Fly Air (FLM) wet-leased.

January 2004: 727-256 (21609), Mahfooz Aviation (BMV) wet-leased.

July 2004: Is in negotiations over partial privatization. The government will retain 30% of new company, with 21% going to the Sudanese private sector.

Yak-42D (4520422306016, UN-42428) returned to Irbis.

November 2004: 2 F 50's (20155, ST-ASF; 20201, ST-ASD), deliveries.

December 2004: A310-300 (562, TC-SGB), SAGA Airlines (SGZ) wet-leased.

April 2005: F 50 (20247, ST-ASI), delivery.

October 2005: F 50 (20256, ST-ASO), delivery.

June 2006: Sudan Airways (SUD) inaugurated nonstop service from Khartoum to Muscat (Oman). The airline now operates a weekly flight departing Khartoum on Thursdays and Muscat on Fridays. While the inaugural service was scheduled to be operated with an MD-83, the service will be operated with an A300.

July 2006: As the Sudanese flag carrier, Sudan Air (SUD) operates scheduled, domestic, jet airplane services, as well as international scheduled flights to destinations in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East.

(IATA) Code: SD - 200. (ICAO) Code: SUD (Callsign - SUDANAIR).
SITA: KRTFFSD.

(http://www.sudanair.com). (info@sudanair.com).

(cargo@sudanair.com).

Parent organization/shareholders: Sudanese government (100%).

Main Base: Khartoum Civil airport (KRT).

Domestic, Scheduled Destinations: Dongola; El Fasher; El Obeid; Geneina; Juba; Khartoum; Malakal; Nyala; Port Sudan; & Wadi Halfa.

International, Scheduled Destinations: Abu Dhabi; Addis Ababa; Al Ain; Bamako; Cairo; Damascus; Damman; Doha; Dubai; Entebbe; Jeddah; Kano; Lagos; Nairobi; Niamey; Riyadh; & Tripoli.

October 2006: Sudan Airways (SUD) resumed Khartoum - London service with twice-weekly flights aboard an A300-600. Saturday flights are to Heathrow and Tuesday flights to Gatwick. (SUD) took delivery of a third A300-600 in the spring.

March 2007: Starting April 5th, Khartoum - Al Ain, using A310s.

May 2007: Starts Khartoum - Muscat, using A300s.

June 2007: ACCDT: A (SUD) A310-300 carrying 214 people veered off the runway in a thunderstorm and burst into flames, killing dozens unable to escape the inferno. Officials said more than >100 people fled the plane before it was engulfed by towering orange flames. An "Associated Press" reporter at the scene said the Sudan Airways (SUD) jetliner appeared to have left the runway after landing at Khartoum International Airport, and several loud explosions resounded as fire raced through the airplane. The roaring blaze dwarfed the A310's shattered fuselage as firefighters sprayed water with little apparent effect, Sudanese TV footage showed. Ambulances and firetrucks rushed to the scene, and media were kept away. The Civil Aviation Authority confirmed that 103 passengers and all 11 crew members (FC) - (CA) survived. In addition, it said some other passengers may have gone home directly after the crew (CA) helped them through the emergency doors. Officials said most aboard were Sudanese. Death toll reports conflicted. State TV initially said about 100 were killed, but officials later put the toll at dozens, without being more precise. Deputy parliament speaker, Mohammed al-Hassan al-Ameen said "about 30 people" died, while police spokesman, Mohammed Abdel Majid al-Tayeb said 23 bodies were brought to the morgue. "There are missing passengers who could be still inside the plane, or left the airplane, but did not inform officials," al-Tayeb said. A survivor speaking at the airport to Sudanese TV said the landing was "rough," and there was a sharp impact several minutes later. "The right wing was on fire," said the passenger, who did not give his name. He said smoke got into the cockpit and some people started opening the emergency exits. Soon, fire engulfed the plane, he said. The cause of the accident wasn't immediately known and there were differing reports on the role weather played. A sandstorm had hit the area with 20 mph winds between 2 pm and 3 pm and there was a thunderstorm and similar winds at the time of the crash around 9 pm, said Elaine Yang, a meterologist with the San Francisco-based Weather Underground, a private weather service. The Sudanese ambassador to Washington called the weather "very bad" and said the runway had been drenched by rain. "There was a lot of water on the runway and they still tried to land," Ambassador John Ukec Lueth Ukec said.

The head of Sudanese police, Mohammad Najib, said bad weather "caused the plane to crash land, split into two and catch fire." Youssef Ibrahim, director of the Khartoum airport, disputed that bad weather caused the crash. He told Sudanese TV that the plane "landed safely" and the pilot (FC) was talking to the control tower and getting further instructions, when the accident occurred. "One of the (plane's) engines exploded and the plane caught fire," Ibrahim said. He blamed the accident on technical problems, but didn't elaborate.

Raqeeb Abdel-Latif, head of the (SUD) office in Damascus, Syria, said the plane, which joined the Sudanese national carrier seven months ago, took off from Damascus and stopped in Amman, Jordan, where 34 additional passengers came on board. Due to inclement weather, the airplane stopped at Port Sudan Airport along the Red Sea, picking up 35 passengers and refueling before heading back to Khartoum, the Sudanese ambassador said in Washington.

Spokesmen for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in Washington said they were monitoring the situation. The Khartoum airport was shut down until Wednesday morning, officials said.

Sudan has a poor aviation safety record. In May, a plane crash in a remote area of southern Sudan killed 24 people, including key members of the southern Sudanese government. In July 2003, a (SUD) 737 en route from Port Sudan to Khartoum crashed soon after takeoff, killing all 115 people on board. After that crash, Sudanese officials blamed sanctions for restricting vital aircraft parts. The USA State Department said there was no ban on equipment needed for aviation safety.

In 1997, then-President Clinton issued an executive order barring the export of goods and technology to Sudan because of the country's "support for international terrorism, ongoing efforts to destabilize neighboring governments, and the prevalence of human rights violations."

The United Nations (UN) Security Council has imposed an embargo on providing arms or military training to armed groups in Sudan's Darfur region and a travel ban and asset freeze on some people implicated in the violence there.

In July 2006, an A310 operated by Russia's S7 Airlines (SBR) went off the runway after landing in Irkutsk, smashed into adjacent buildings and caught fire, killing 123 of the 203 people aboard.

Although deaths from air travel have fallen over the past two years, the number of serious jetliner accidents increased last year for the first time in a decade, according to a report last month by the International Air Transport Association (IATA). Nearly half of all jet accidents occurred on landing in 2007.

The death toll from the (SUD) A310 runway excursion accident in Khartoum stands at 30, many fewer than originally feared, with most passengers able to escape the airplane before it was consumed by fire. The A310 departed Amman, made an en route stop in Damascus and then flew on to Khartoum, where it landed during a heavy rainstorm. Police spokesperson Major General Mohammed Abdel Majid Al-Tayeb told the "Associated Press" that the airplane was unable to come to a stop, skidding off the runway and crashing into lights alongside. Sudan Transport Minister Mabrouk Mubarak Salim said weather conditions were likely the "main reason for what happened."
The flight carried 214 passengers and crew (not 217 as initially reported) and 170 have been accounted for. Another 30 have been declared dead, while 14 have not been located. In the aftermath of the crash, authorities say some survivors left the scene without being counted or going through customs. Airbus (EDS) said it is sending a team of experts to the scene to assist with the crash investigation.

The Sudan government grounded flag carrier, (SUD) and suspended its air operating certificate (AOC) for breaching unidentified rules and noncompliance, according to widespread press reports from Khartoum. A civil aviation authority official was quoted as saying the grounding was for "an undefined period" and was unrelated to the A310 accident that killed at least 30, two weeks ago.

Sudan suffered two fatal freighter crashes in recent days. A Jubba Air Cargo An-12BK crashed in "poor weather" on its way from Khartoum to Jubbah, according to Flight Safety Foundation's Aviation Safety Network, killing seven of the eight people on board. The airplane first flew in 1968. Also recently, an Ababeel Aviation Il-76TD crashed on takeoff in Khartoum, killing all four on board.

(SUD) announced that it will be partially privatized. The government will keep 30% while Kuwait's Aref Investment Group will take 49% and Sudan's Faiha Holding will have 21%. The move is part of a privatization program launched by the government in 2004. "The three parties are expecting a successful cooperation and a historic boost for the airline in all aspects," the carrier said, adding that its "final destination . . . is the transformation of (SUD) into a stock market company."

737-2K3 (23912, YU-ANP), returned to Aviogenex (AVG).

January 2009: MD-83 (49619, EC-KCX), returned to SwiftAir (SWF).

October 2009: ACCDT: An AZZA Transport (AZT) 707-330C freighter (JT3D-7) (788-20123, /69 P4-AKW) on wet-lease to Sudan Airways (SUD) operating a cargo service (SD 2241) between Sharjah and Khartoum, crashed shortly after taking off from Sharjah, killing all six Flight Crew (FC) members aboard. The flight was scheduled to land in Khartoum. The airplane was destroyed, according to the Flight Safety Foundation's Aviation Safety Network. According to reports, the Flight Crew (FC) declared an emergency immediately after lift off, reporting the failure of the right outboard engine. The airplane subsequently veered sharply to the right and impacted the ground. Am airport surveillance video released after the crash shows the airplane climb out normally, but after it disappears from view, a large part is seen to fall from the sky. The airplane then comes back into view banking steeply to the right and losing height. It impacted the ground about five seconds later.

On October 25th, the UAE Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) identified the part that fell from the airplane as the cowling of an engine. It added that the cowling separated 20 seconds after lift off and the airplane started to roll to the right immediately thereafter and impacted the ground 1.1 nm/2.1 km from the end of the runway. The Cockpit Voice and Flight Data Recorders (CVR/(CFDR)s were recovered and were sent to0 the United Kingdom for analysis.

AZZA Transport (AZT) was banned from flying in the UAE until the end of the investigation.

March 2010: The European Commission (EC)'s 13th update of its list of airlines banned from operating within the European Union (EU)'s borders includes all carriers from the Philippines and Sudan, as well as Iran Air (IRN). Philippine Airlines (PAL) currently operates to five North American destinations but neither it nor its affiliates fly to Europe, while Iran Air (IRN) does serve the continent.

The (EC) said it "acknowledges the recent efforts launched by the competent authorities to reform the civil aviation system in the Philippines" and that (PAL) and Cebu Air (CEB) have taken measures. However, it said it would "follow the principle of precaution" and impose a full operating ban. Sudan, the (EC) said, was guilty of "persistent noncompliance with international standards in the area of oversight." Ramp checks of Iran Air (IRN) airplanes serving the (EU), along with "serious incidents and accidents suffered by the carrier and insufficient oversight from the authority over the past year," led the (EC) to ban certain airplanes from operating. It said it plans a visit to Iran "over the next months" to verify safety oversight. It did not indicate which airplanes are banned.

The (EC) lifted some restrictions on TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG) and Air Koryo (KOY). Air Koryo (KOY), banned since March 2006, will be allowed to operate two specially equipped airplanes into the (EU), while TAAG (ANG) will be allowed to fly to any (EU) destination "under certain strict conditions with specific airplanes." Other Angolan airlines remain banned. The commission said it is "closely monitoring" airlines from Albania and Egypt. The blacklist still includes Ariana Afghan Airlines (AFG), Siem Reap Airways International (SRA), Silverback Cargo Freighters (VRB) and all airlines from 17 countries, including Indonesia.

September 2012: Marsland Aviation (MSL) and Sudan Airways (SUD) are expected to be the first two airlines that will again operate between Khartoum (KRT) and Juba (JUB) airports after Sudan and South Sudan have reached an agreement for flights to resume following after armed conflicts between the two countries over lands claimed by both in the border regions had led to a suspension of flights between the two capitals in April.

February 2013: Sudan Airways ((IATA) Code: SD, based at Khartoum (KRT)) (SUD) might receive An-148-100 and An-158 airplanes as early as later this year allowing it to renew its fleet despite the USA trade embargo on Sudan. The country's Transport Minister, Ahmed Babiker Nahar has signed a preliminary agreement with Antonov Design Bureau (Gostomel Antonov International (UKKM)) and hopes to receive loans from Antonov to be able to finance a firm order for the airplanes. Sudan Airways (SUD) currently operates two A300-600s and four Fokker F 50s, although half of its fleet is currently grounded for maintenance as (SUD) struggles to receive spare parts for its airplanes. Sudan Airways (SUD) also wet-leases an A320-214 (3040, D6-CAS) from Comoros Islands Airline ((ICAO) Code: CIN, based at Moroni Prince Said Ibrahim International (HAH)).

December 2013: Sudan Airways ((IATA) Code: SD, based at Khartoum) (SUD) has started wet-leasing a Jordan Aviation ((IATA) Code: R5, based at Amman Queen Alia) (JOR) 737-400 (27826, JY-JAQ). (SUD) currently operates two other 737s: a 737-300 (28673, 4L-AJO), and a 737-500 (27356, 4L-AJV), both of which are leased from Vista Georgia ((IATA) Code: JD, based at Tbilisi).

Sudan Airways (SUD) currently flies 10 airplanes to 9 countries, 20 destinations, on 28 routes and 29 daily flights.

September 2014: Sudan Airways (SUD) Managing Director, Elmahmoud Suleiman Mohammed, has bemoaned USA sanctions on his country, claiming they were severely hampering plans to renew (SUD)'s aging fleet.

Speaking to the "AirFinance Journal," Mohammed said Sudan Airways (SUD) has been hunting on the market for between two to five A320s and A321s, but has so far been thwarted by USA economic and trade sanctions imposed in 1997 in response to the North African country's alleged connection to terror networks and human rights abuses.

As a result, the country's once vibrant airline industry has been unable to access new Western-built airplanes forcing operators to wet-lease in expensive foreign jets.

For its part, Sudan Airways (SUD) has been left with a decrepit fleet of aging A300-600s and three Fokker F 50s. An A320-200 (3040, D6-CAS), on lease from Comoro Islands Airline ((ICAO) Code: CIN, based at Moroni International), has now been withdrawn from service and is currently in storage at Khartoum.

November 2014: Sudan Airways (SUD) has leased an A320-200 from Ukrainian wet-lease (ACMI) specialist, YanAir ((IATA) Code: YE, based at Kiev Zhulyany). "Skyliner Aviation" records the airplane as UR-YAD (726, UR-YAD). The sanctions-stricken Sudanese national carrier also operates three Fokker F 50s and relies on leased metal (Vista Georgia ((ICAO) Code: AJD, based at Tbilisi) (AJD) in particular) for its operational needs

December 2015: EgyptAir (EGP) has been fined USD140,000 by the USA Bureau of Industry & Security (BIS) for violating a USA trade embargo against Sudan between 2010 and 2011.

The (BIS) said that Egyptair (EGP) had leased two 737-500s to Sudan Airways ((IATA) Code: SD, based at Khartoum) (SUD) over the period August 2010 to February 2011 without having sought the required licences as required under Executive Orders 13067 and 13412. As a result, (EGP) must now pay the USA Department of Commerce USD140,000 in four instalments of USD35,000 by November 1, 2016. Failure to pay the fine may result in the (BIS) revoking (EGP)'s export privileges for a period of one year, the Bureau said.

In retaliation for Khartoum's alleged involvement in international terrorism, the Clinton administration in 1997 instituted a trade embargo against Sudan and issued a total asset freeze against the country's government.

As a government-owned entity, Sudan Airways (SUD) has borne the brunt of sanctions seeing its once prominent fleet whittled down to a handful of ageing aircraft including three Fokker 50s and two A300-600s. To make up for its inability to source relatively 'new' machinery, (SUD) leases in capacity and, at present, leases two A320-200s from YanAir ((IATA) Code:YE, based at Kiev Zhulyany) (ANR), one 737-300 from Jordan Aviation ((IATA) Code: R5, based at Amman Queen Alia) (JOR) and one CRJ-200 from Kenya's Trident Aviation (based at Nairobi Wilson).

Sudanese President, Omar al-Bashir said Khartoum would acquire an undisclosed number of Chinese aircraft to help replenish the national carrier's fleet.

January 2015: The USA Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry & Security (BIS) has fined Egyptair (EGP) $140,000 for leasing airplanes to Sudan Airways (SUD), in breach of sanctions against the latter nation.

The fine followed an investigation triggered by (EGP) having leased two Boeing 737-500s to Sudan Airways (SUD) in 2010 - 2011, breaching the USA Export Administration Regulations. The lease was effectively a re-export of USA airliners, the (BIS) said.

Sudan has been under sanctions since 1997 because of its alleged support of terrorism and human rights abuses. Sudan Airways (SUD) has increasingly struggled to maintain services in recent years and has been forced to resort to leasing in capacity.

At the Arab Air Carriers Organization annual meeting in Doha in November 2013, Sudan Airways (SUD)’s General Manager, Abd Elmahmoud Suliman Mohamed detailed the burdens under which his company was laboring: “It’s difficult to find people who can work with you. We find difficulties in funding from the international financial community. There are difficulties in even transferring simple sums of money.”

However, he said, the USA sanctions did not stop a steady trickle of international entrepreneurs or foreign companies offering airplanes.

Although in principle, companies can apply to the (BIS) for licenses to export airplanes to Sudan, the regulations state that these “will generally be denied.”

Egyptair (EGP) must pay its fine in four instalments of $35,000, with the last due on November 1. If it fails to do so, the (BIS) can issue an order suspending all the airline’s re-export privileges under the regulations for one year.



Note: SUDAN AIRWAYS (SUD) is listed on the latest (EU) blacklist released 03.04.2012 of airlines whose operations are subject to a ban within the (EU)*. *Airlines listed in Annex A could be permitted to exercise traffic rights by using wet-leased airplanes of an air carrier which is not subject to an operating ban, provided that the relevant safety standards are complied with.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
SUD-757-256
SUD-A300-600R - 2014-08.jpg
SUD-A300B4-120
SUD-IL-62M

April 2016:

2 707-3J8C (JT3D-7) (885-20897, /74 ST-AFA; 887-20898, /74 ST-AFB), FREIGHTER.

0 707-330C (JT3D-7) (788-20123, /69 P4-AKW - - CRASHED & DESTROYED - - READ ACCDT - - OCTOBER 2009), EX-(DLH), (AZT) WET-LSD 2009-10. FREIGHTER.

0 727-231 (JT8D-7B) (603-19565, /68 5Y-AXB), ALFA AFRICA LSD 2002-01. RTND. 146Y.

0 727-243 (JT8D-15) (1814-22702, /82 YU-AKM), AVIOGENEX (AVG) WET-LSD 2005-11. ST KAM-AIR (KMF) 2006-11. 179Y.

0 727-251 (JT8D-7B/-9A) (665-19973, /68 C5-SMM), EX-(NIA), (BMV) LSD 1999-02. IN ALL WHITE COLORS. RTND. 146Y.

0 727-256 (JT8D-9) (1369-21609, C5-SBM), (BMV) WET-LSD 2004-01. RTND. 153Y.

0 737-2H3 (JT8D-17) (758-22624, /81 TS-IOE; 776-22625, TS-IOF), (TUN) WET-LSD 2002-10. 758; 776; RTND. 10F, 94Y.

0 737-2J8C (JT8D-7) (429-21169, /75 ST-AFK, W/O IN ACCDT - - SEE JULY 2003; 430-21170, /75) (21170 W/O IN ACCDT - - SEE JULY 1998). 10F, 94Y.

0 737-2K3 (JT8D-15 HK) (1401-23912, /87 YU-ANP), (AVG) WET-LSD. RTND 2007-06. 125Y.

1 737-300 (CFM56-3C) (28673, 4L-AJO), VISTA GEORGIA LSD 2013-06.

0 737-4Q8 (CFM56-3) (2598-25375, TC-ANH), (TOI) WET-LSD 2001-10 TO 2001-12.

0 737-400 (CFM56-3), (THY) LSD 2002-01, GROUNDED. RTND.

1 737-400 (CFM56-3) (27826, JY-JAQ), (JOR) WET-LSD 2013-12.

1 737-500 (CFM56-3) (27356, 4L-AJV), VISTA GEORGIA LSD 2013-06.

0 757-256 (TC-FLD), EX-(NAB), (FLM) WET-LSD 2003-08. RTND.

0 757-27BER (RB211-535E4) (169-24136, /88 TC-FLC), (FLM) WET-LSD 2003-05. RTND.

0 L-1011-100 (1231, 9L-LDC), (UVL) WET-LSD 2002-11. RTND.

0 L-1011-385-1 (1179, 9L-LDR), LANTA LSD, STAR AIR WET-LSD 2003-08. RTND.

0 A300B4-103 (CF6-50C2) (046, TC-ANI), EX-(TSD) 2001-06 (EI-TLM), (GEF) LSD, (TOI) WET-LSD 2002-07. RTT (TOI) 2002-10.

0 A300B4-120 (JT9D-59A) (079, /79 TC-OYC "HAKAN"), (FLM) WET-LSD 2003-10. RTND. 289Y.

0 A300B4-203 (127, TC-FLA), (FLM) WET-LSD 2002-12. RTND.

0 A300B4-605R (CF6-80C2) (505, F-OIHB), EX-(EAD), (AIFS) LSD, RTND 2000-12, LST (TUN).

0 A300-622R (PW4158) (530), EX-(KAL), RTND (AFIS) 2001-05.

3 A300B4-622 (PW4158) (252, /83 ST-ASS; 559, ST-), CREDIT LYONAISE LSD. 20C, 245Y.

1 A300B4-622R (PW4158) (775, /97 ST-AST), DOLPHIN AIR LSD 2006-03. 20C, 245Y.

0 A310-222 (JT9D-7R4E1) (357, /85 JY-CAV), (JOR) WET-LSD 2003-09. RTND.

0 A310-304 (CF6-80C2A2) (562, /90 TC-SGB), (SGZ) WET-LSD 2004-12. RTND. 18C, 191Y.

1 A310-322 (JT9D-7R4E1) (437, /87 ST-AST), 2005-10. 254Y.

1 A320-200 (726, UR-YAD), YANAIR WET-LSD 2014-11.

0 A320-212 (CFM56-5-A1), LSD, TECH SPT & MAINT FROM (RJA). RTND.

1 A320-214 (3040, D6-CAS), COMOROS AIRLINES AIRLINE WET-LSD.

1 CRJ200 (7350, 5Y-WAA), EX-(EC-HHV), DAC AVIATION LSD 2015-11.

0 F 27-600 (DART 536-7R) (10563, /77 ST-SSD), RTND. 44Y.

0 F 50, (20157; 20158; SOLD 1998-08), 2 GROUNDED.

3 F 50 (20155, ST-ASF; 20201, ST-ASD; 20247, ST-ASI, 2005-04), 2004-11. (AJD) WET-LSD.

2 F 50 (20246; 20256), EX-(AUK) 2005-02.

1 F 50 (20256, ST-ASO), 2005-10.

0 DHC-6-300 TWIN OTTERS (238 SOLD 2000-11), SOLD.

2 AN-24RV (AI-24VT) (67310505, /76 RA-47318; 7910405, /67 RA-49273), EX-(DJB), AEROKUZBASS LSD 2002-10. 44Y.

1 AN-24T (AI-24VT) (/00, EK-98116), (URT) LSD. 44Y.

2 AN-24T (AI-24VT) (7910405, /67 EK-49273; 9911102, EK-49275), (ARQ) WET-LSD 2003-02. 44Y/COMBI/F.

1 ANTONOV AN-148-100.

1 ANTONOV AN-158.

1 IL-18D (184007405, T9-ABB), PHOENIX LSD 1999-12.

1 IL-18D (3C-KKL), (CES) LSD 2000-03.

0 YAK-42D (D-36) (4520422306016, /93 UN-42428), EX-(CES) 2000-12, (IRT) LSD. RTND IRBIS 2004-07. 120Y.

Management:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
SUD-MD

ELMAHMOUD SULEIMAN MOHAMMED, MANAGING DIRECTOR.

NASREDIN AHMED, MANAGING DIRECTOR (ahmed@sudanair.com).

MUKHTAR OSMAN, GENERAL MANAGER.

SHIEKH ELDIN ABDALLA, DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR TECHNICAL.

FAISAL MUKHTAR, DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR ADMINISTRATION.

ELRASHEID GAAFAR, DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR MARKETING.

O HIGAZIE, OPERATIONS DIRECTOR (KRTOWSD).

CAPTAIN ADEL GADIR, FLEET CAPTAIN 707.

CAPTAIN BASHIR AL BASHIR, FLEET CAPTAIN 737.

E MEKKI, DIRECTOR ENGINEERING (KRTEVSD/KRTEMSD).

ELFATIH MAAROUF, DIRECTOR GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT (GSE).

R BELAL, DIRECTOR COMMERCIAL.

A IDRIS, DIRECTOR ADMINISTRATION AFFAIRS.

ELNAIEM HAMAD MEDAWI MEZEINI, CHIEF INSPECTOR/ASSISTANT DIRECTOR QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA).

FATHI MOHAMED, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR ENGINEERING & PLANNING (1996-10).

TAG EL MIGOUMI, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR MAINTENANCE & OVERHAUL.

MIRGHANI HIRGHANI, MANAGER WORKSHOPS.

SALAH A HASSAN, MANAGER TECHNICAL LIBRARY.

 
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