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Name: TUNISAIR
7JetSet7 Code: TUN
Status: Operational
Region: AFRICA
City: TUNIS-CARTHAGE
Country: TUNISIA
Employees 8400
Web: tunisair.com.tn
Email: mail@tunisair.com.tn
Telephone: +216 7083 7000
Fax: +216 7083 6900
Sita: TUNXTTU
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
TUN-2002-RANKINGS
TUN-2003-A
TUN-2003-B
TUN-2003-LEIPAX-STATS
TUN-2004-03-NEWS
TUN-2004-07
TUN-2005-10-A
TUN-2006-04-A
TUN-2006-04-B
TUN-2006-04-C
TUN-2006-04-D
TUN-2006-WLD CUP SOCCER
TUN-MRO
TUN-PASSENGER GROWTH
TUN-TOP 12 ROUTES - 2013-04

FORMED IN 1948 ANDS STARTED OPERATIONS IN 1949. A K A SOCIETE TUNISIENNE DE L'AIR. REGIONAL & INTERNATIONAL, SCHEDULED & CHARTER, PASSENGER & CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
BOULEVARD DU 7 NOVEMBRE 1987
2035 TUNIS CARTHAGE, TUNISIA

TUNISIA (REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA) WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1956 AND COVERS AN AREA OF 163,610 SQ KM. THE POPULATION IS 9.0M. THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGE IS ARABIC. THE CAPITAL IS TUNIS.

APRIL 1993: GOVERNMENT OWNS 45%. AIR FRANCE (AFA) OWNS 5.58%.

1992 = +$69 MILLION (+$20.3 MILLION) (NET PROFIT): +18.8% (RPK) (PASSENGER TRAFFIC); +28.1% PASSENGERS (PAX); +38.2% (FTK) (FREIGHT TRAFFIC).

2 (JAT) AIRWAYS 727'S, & 2 737-300'S, PREVIOUSLY WET LEASED TO TUNISAIR (TUN), NOW OUT OF SERVICE SINCE NOVEMBER 1992, WITH PRESERVATION MAINTAINED BY 6 (JAT) AIRWAYS PERSONNEL, WHO ALSO VISITED LIBYAN ARAB AIRLINES (LAA), 3 TIMES IN MARCH 1993 FOR ENGINEERING SUPPORT FOR 727 "D" CHECK.

MAY 1993: 2ND 737-5H3 (PT642) "HAMMAMET", 126Y PAX DELIVERY.

FEBRUARY 1994: 737-500 DELIVERY.

APRIL 1994: 1 737-200 (JT8D-15) & 1 L-1011-100, BOTH 6 MONTH LEASED, FROM AIR ATLANTA ICELANDIC (AID), & 1 A320-200 (CFM56-5-A3) DELIVERY.

OCTOBER 1994: 1ST A320 "D" CHECK. 727-200, EX-ROYAL AIR MAROC (RAM), 737-200, & L-1011-100, BOTH AIR ATLANTA ICELANDIC (AID), ALL WET LEASED, NOW RETURNED.

MARCH 1995: 737-5H3 (PT644), & A320-200 (CFM56-5A1) DELIVERY.

APRIL 1995: 1 A300B4-100 (CF6-50C2), WET-LEASED.

JUNE 1995: GOVERNMENT IS OFFERING TO SELL 15% OF CURRENT 84.86%. AIR FRANCE (AFA) OWNS 5.58%. 2 727'S & 2 737-300'S (JAT) AIRWAYS OWNED, STORED & MAINTAINED BY 6 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT) FROM (JAT) AIRWAYS.

DECEMBER 1995: H SIOUD DIRECTOR TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT, ALSO ACTING DIRECTOR MAINTENANCE & ENGINEERING.

2 "D" MAINTENANCE CHECKS 727'S (QA571 & QB403). NEW ENGINEERING FACILITY JUST COMPLETED.

JANUARY 1996: 1995 = -3.2% PASSENGERS (PAX), +2.7% (FTK) (FREIGHT TRAFFIC).

JUNE 1996: 727 (QD404) "D" CHECK TOOK 4 MONTHS. 1 727, 178 PAX, (JAT) AIRWAYS LEASED, UNTIL OCTOBER 1996.

AUGUST 1996: 1 747-246B (RA541), AIR ATLANTA ICELANDIC (AID) 2 MONTH LEASED, 476 PAX.

SEPTEMBER 1996: LEASING A300B4, TO AIRBUS, FOR CERTIFICATION OF GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS).

OCTOBER 1996: HAS PERFORMED "D" CHECK ON 5 727'S, THE REST TO BE SCHEDULED IN 4TH Q 1996. PROPOSAL FOR QATAR AIRWAYS (QTA) 727 "D" CHECK.

NOVEMBER 1996: HABIB AZIB, EX-SENIOR MANAGER STRUCTURES/SYSTEMS, ASSIGNED AS DIRECTOR ENGINEERING/MAINTENANCE FOR DOMESTIC TUNINTER (TUI).

TUNINTER 1 DC-9-32 (47571), (JAT) AIRWAYS LEASED.

FEBRUARY 1997: COMPLETED "C4" CHECK ON QATAR AIRWAYS (QTA) 727. PEMCO, COPENHAGEN HAS CONTRACT FOR COMPONENT MAINTENANCE.

APRIL 1997: 7,197 EMPLOYEES.

JUNE 1997: 1996 = +$24.2M (NET PROFIT): 2.69 PASSENGERS (PAX) (+4.2%).

1 A300B4-622R (559), AIRBUS SHORT-TERM LEASED FOR +4.3% RPK (PASSENGER TRAFFIC). 1 A310-304 (473), AIRBUS (AIFIS) LEASED.

JULY 1997: 1 747-200, QATAR AIRWAYS (QTA) LEASED, FOR SUMMER SEASON. ALSO, A DC-10 WET-LEASED OPERATED OUT OF MONASTIR. 1 A300B4-203 (145) EX-(AMC) AIRLINES (AMF). RETURNS A300B4-622R (559) TO (ILF), & A310-304 TO AIRBUS.

SEPTEMBER 1997: PLANS SERVICE TO ABIDJAN, BAMAKO, BEIRUT, DUBAI, BUCHAREST, RUSSIA, AND UKRAINE, IN 1998.

OCTOBER 1997: JEAN PIERSON AIRBUS CHAIRMAN & (CEO) SIGNED CONTRACT, (HE WAS BORN IN BIZERTE, TUNISIA, AND ATTENDED SCHOOL WITH SOME OF TUNISAIR (TUN) EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT) FOR 4/3 ORDERS (APRIL 1999) 737-600, $300 MILLION.

7,134 EMPLOYEES.

PLANS TO SELL 20% TO FOREIGN INVESTORS REDUCING GOVERNMENT STAKE TO 45%.

3 ORDERS (JUNE 1998) A319 (1ST IN AFRICA & MIDDLE EAST) AND 7 ORDERS A320'S. NOW OPERATES 1 A300 & 8 A320'S.

NOVEMBER 1997: INCREASED HOLIDAY TRAVEL, RESULTED IN LEASES OF 1 727, EX-AIR SLOVAKIA (SLO), 737-300 EX-OLYMPIC AIRWAYS (OLY), 1 DC-10, EX-SKY JET, & 1 A300, EX-(AMC) AIRLINES (AMF) FOR FRANCE ROUTE.

DECEMBER 1997: 1 DC-9-32 (687-47563), (JAT) AIRWAYS LEASED FOR TUNINTER (TUI).

JANUARY 1998: A300B4-203 (175) RETURNED TO TUNISAIR (TUN).

MARCH 1998: CODE SHARE WITH EGYPTAIR (EGP).

1 737-200 (23320), EX-BOURAQ (PTB), INDIGO 2 YEAR LEASED FOR TUNINTER.

APRIL 1998: JERBA TO LONDON (HEATHROW).

7,197 EMPLOYEES.

JUNE 1998: 1997 FISCAL YEAR (FY) = 3.25 MILLION PASSENGERS (PAX) (+20%).

AUGUST 1998: 1ST OF 3 A319, 144Y PAX, DELIVERY.

SEPTEMBER 1998: DC-10-30 (234-46959), EX-MALAYSIAN AIRLINES (MAS). A319-114 (880) DELIVERY. +2 ORDERS (JUNE 2000) 737-600 FOR.

OCTOBER 1998: 1997 = +$18.8 MILLION (+$56 MILLION) (NET PROFIT).

NOVEMBER 1998: DC-9-32 (689-47568) RETURNED TO (JAT) AIRWAYS. WITHDRAWS 3 OF 7 727-200'S FROM SERVICE, AND REST IN 1999.

DECEMBER 1998: 2 A300-600, EMIRATES (EAD) 2 YEAR LEASED.

JANUARY 1999: 50 YEAR ANNIVERSARY! ADOPTS NEW FLEET LIVERY.

ABDELMALAK LAARIF PRESIDENT REPLACES AHMED SMAOUI, WHO RETIRED.

FEBRUARY 1999: REGIONAL OPERATOR TUNINTER (TUI) IS UP FOR SALE. CONTINUES WITH PLAN TO RETIRE 727'S.

MARCH 1999: SOLD LAST 7 727-200'S. 2 A320-211'S (CFM56-5A5) (958, TS-IML; 975, TS-IMM) DELIVERIES.

APRIL 1999: 7,250 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 288 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 650 CABIN ATTENDANTS (CA)).

SITA: TUNDGTU.

(http://www.tunisair.com.tn).

MAY 1999: 1ST 2 737-600'S (YE151, TS-10K; YE152, TS-10L) DELIVERIES.

JULY 1999: 3RD 727-200 (20948) SOLD TO KALITTA (KAC). 1 737-800, 1 747-200, & 1 767-300 LEASED, FOR SUMMER SEASON. 3RD 737-600 (YE153, TS-IOM), DELIVERY.

AUGUST 1999: 747-200 (JT9D-7A) (20257), EX-CONTINENTAL AIRLINES (CAL), AIR ATLANTA ICELANDIC (AID) SUB-WET-LEASED, UNTIL 10/99.

SEPTEMBER 1999: HECMI SIOUD VP TECHNICAL & OPERATIONS (ACTING), REPLACES HAMDA HAJJI.

NOVEMBER 1999: 2 ORDERS A300B4-605R'S, EX-EMIRATES (EAD) (4/00).

DECEMBER 1999: HACHMI SIOUD VP OPERATIONS & TECHNICAL. FAYCAL CHEIKH ROUHOU DIRECTOR ENGINEERING.

1 ORDER (3/00) 737-300 (24905), GECAS (GEH) LEASED FOR TUNINTER (TUI) 30 MONTHS, EX-TRANSAVIA (TAV).

FEBRUARY 2000: NEGOTIATING WITH NORDAM, FOR 737-200 FLEET, HUSHKITS, TO STAGE III, & (JAR) 145 REGULATIONS.

TUNINTER (TUI) INDICATES ITS PLANS TO SEPARATE FROM PARENT, TUNISAIR (TUN) AND BE AN INDEPENDENT OPERATOR OF DOMESTIC SCHEDULED SERVICES. NOUVALAIR (NOU) HAS EXPRESSED INTEREST IN ACQUIRING (TUI).

1 737-3Y0 DELIVERY (2001-24905, TS-IEB), (GEH) LEASED FOR TUNINTER (TUI) OPERATIONS.

MARCH 2000: NACEUR BEN SALHA ENGINEERING MANAGER REPLACED FAYCAL CHEIKHROUHOU.

1 A300B4-605R (CF6-80C2) (563, A6-EKE) EMIRATES (EAD) LEASED. A320-211 (1187, TS-INA) DELIVERY.

APRIL 2000: 7,259 EMPLOYEES.

1 A300-600R (CF6-80C2) (558), EX-EMIRATES (EAD). 737-6H3 (510-29499, TS-ION) DELIVERY.

MAY 2000: 2 737-6H3'S (543-29500, TS-IOP; 563-29501, TS-IOQ) DELIVERIES.

JULY 2000: 1999 = 7.37 Million (FTK); 1.92 MILLION PAX; 7,259 EMPLOYEES; +$7.28 MILLION.

1 A321, EX-BRUSSELS INTERNATIONAL (BIA).

AUGUST 2000: TO CODE SHARE WITH ROYAL AIR MAROC (RAM) FROM CASABLANCA TO NEW YORK (JFK) AND TO AFRICAN DESTINATIONS. ALSO, FROM TUNIS TO MIDDLE EAST, AND EASTERN EUROPEAN POINTS.

SIGNS COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH DELTA AIRLINES (DAL).

SEPTEMBER 2000: 1 737-800, AND 1 A321, LEASED FOR SUMMER SEASON. A321-131 (591) RETURNED TO BRUSSELS INTERNATIONAL (BIA).

OCTOBER 2000: 1 737-448 (1742-24474, /89 SU-HMD), LUXOR (LXR) SEMI-WET-LEASED, TUNISAIR (TUN) MAINTENANCE.

NOVEMBER 2000: TUNISAIR (TUN) NOW OWNS 60% OF TUNINTER (TUI).

737-7H3 BBJ (348-29149, /99 TS-IOO) DELIVERED AFTER INTERIOR MODIFICATIONS AT WACO, TEXAS, TO BE USED AS A "HEAD OF STATE" AIRPLANE.

DECEMBER 2000: 1 A300B4-605R (CF6-80C2A5) (505, TS-IPC), EX-SUDAN AIRWAYS (SUD), AIRBUS (EDS) LEASED.

APRIL 2001: 7,269 EMPLOYEES.

SCHEDULED, & CHARTER NETWORK, TO 126 DESTINATIONS, IN 30 COUNTRIES, DOMESTICALLY & EUROPEAN.

1 737-6H3 DELIVERY (816-29502, TS-IOR "EL JEM"). 1 A319-114 (1479, TS-IMO) DELIVERY.

MAY 2001: LOTFI HAJRI DIRECTOR QUALITY ASSURANCE & QUALITY CONTROL.

JUNE 2001: SIGNS UP FOR myboeingfleet.com.

AGREES TO CODE SHARE WITH CROSSAIR (CSR).

DIRECTOR ENGINEERING ORDERS 11 PERSONAL COMPUTER (PC) WORK STATIONS, FOR VARIOUS ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS.

LEASES 1 737-85H FROM STERLING (STR), TIL OCTOBER 2001 (186-29445, /99 OY-SEI). 1ST OF 4 727-2H3'S (1252-21318, /77) TO SKY (SYV) AVIATION.

OCTOBER 2001: 1 A300B4-605, EX-EMIRATES (EAD). RETURNS A300B4-203 TO AIRBUS.

NOVEMBER 2001: RAFAA DEKHIL PRESIDENT DIRECTOR GENERAL, REPLACED ABDEL-MALEK LAARIF. CHEDLY DAMERGI, MAINTENANCE DIRECTOR, EX-TUNINTER (TUI).

DECEMBER 2001: SITA: TUNXTTU.

(TELEPHONE: (1) 70 01 00). (FAX: (1) 70 00 08).

MARCH 2002: SOUHEIL BOULAHIA DIRECTOR GENERAL. JEMAA CHAOUCH DIRECTOR MAINTENANCE & ENGINEERING, REPLACES FAYCAL CHEIKH-ROUHOU, WHO HAS BEEN REASSIGNED TO PROJECTS.

APRIL 2002: 7,489 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 354 FC; & 725 CA).

(TELEPHONE: +216 (71) 700 100). (FAX: +216 (71) 700 897).

MAIN BASE: TUNIS - CARTHAGE (TUN).

June 2002: 1 A320-211 (1700, TS-IMP) delivery.

July 2002: 2001 = -$18.14 Million (-$24.3 Million): 2.71 Billion RPK (+.4%); 64.9% LF; 3.56 Million PAX (+2.7%); 17.70 Million FTK )+2.9%); 6,210 Employees (-14.6%).

October 2002: To Dubai, via Beirut (2x-weekly).

2 737-2H3's (758-22624, TS-IOE; 776-22625, TS-IOF), wet-leased to Sudan Airways (SUD).

December 2002: In January 2003, Tunis to Kuwait, via Amman (weekly) and Riyadh, via Jeddah.

January 2003: In April 2003, Tunis - Amman - Kuwait (weekly).

April 2003: 7,489 employees (including 354 FC, & 725 CA).

June 2003: 8 month Contract to Lufthansa Consulting (DLH) to analyze market/organization to develop a new commercial strategy. Stefan Auerbach Managing Director (DLH) Consulting stated "We'll be looking forward to developing for Tunisair (TUN) a strategy that will enable it in changing economic environment to offer a marketable and competitive service both in its home market and internationally."

September 2003: Memo of Understanding (MOU) with Royal Air Maroc (RAM) to cooperate, including code share on routes between Morocco and Tunisia, as well as on transatlantic routes of (RAM) and Middle East routes by (TUN).

In December 2003, Tunis to Abidjan to Bamako (Tuesdays); Tunis to Bamako to Abidjan (Thursdays).

November 2003: In April 2004, Djerba to Strasbourg (weekly). In September 2004, Tozeur to Strasbourg (weekly).

February 2004: Tunis Al-Wassat International Airport is due to open in 2006, easing pressure on the current international airport at Tunis, on a site in Enfidha Ville, between the cities of Hammamet and Sousse. The airport will have an initial capacity of 5 Million passengers, rising to 30 Million, when the project is completed.

March 2004: Aigle Azur (AZU) received most (a total of 1,460/year) of the Paris Orly (ORY) slots previously held by defunct Air Littoral, worth 2x-daily. (COHOR) also distributed former Air Littoral slots to Air Nostrum (104), Egyptair (EGP) (104), Montenegro Airlines (MNO) (936), Pulkovo Airlines (STG) (624), Sky Europe (SKP) (624), Turkish Airlines (THY) (434), and Tunisair (TUN).

April 2004: Djerba to Vienna (737, weekly). Monastir to Berlin (SXF) (737, weekly). Monastir to Belgrade (737, weekly). Tunis to Belgrade (737, weekly). Djerba to Strasbourg (weekly).

June 2004: Djerba to Pisa (737/A320, seasonal weekly charter); Monastir to Pisa (737/A320, seasonal weekly charter).

July 2004: 2003 = -# TND 8.72 Million/-$7 Million (-# TND 37.34 Million): 4.26B RPK (-4.1%); 66.3% LF; 2.96 Million PAX (-5.7%); 19.24 Million FTK (+.2%).

737-33A (23626) Hola (HLB) wet-leased. A320-214 (1370, PH-BMD) Dutchbird (DUT) wet-leased.

September 2004: Tunis - Oran (2/week).

June 2005: 7,082 employees.

January 2006: 3 737-2H3's (21973; 22624; 22625) & 737-2H3C (21974), sold to AeroVista (AEV), United Arab Emirates (UAE).

March 2006: 6 Arab carriers signed an agreement in late January to form Arabesk Group, a consortium "designed to help members realize better commercial potential," according to Arab Air Carriers Organization Secretary General, Abdul Wahab Teffaha. Initial members are EgyptAir (EGP), Gulf Air (GUL), Middle East Airlines (MEA), Royal Jordanian (RJA), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SVA), and Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM). The group said Tunisair (TUN) likely will join soon. Formation of the entity was discussed last summer. "The cooperation is already yielding benefits for the individual carriers and is demonstrating that this is a good path for the future, as well as providing value-added service to travelers through better market coverage," Teffaha said. The airlines will cooperate on scheduling, operate code share flights and have special prorate agreements during the summer schedule period. Sabre Airlines Solutions consulted on the formation of Arabesk.

July 2006: Tunisair (TUN) announced that its 2005 net profit improved +43% year-over-year to +$29.6 million and that it is planning a +$2.6 million capital increase to $60.5 million. It generated $676 million in operating revenues over the 12-month period, representing a +7% increase. Operating expenses also rose +7% to just under $664 million.

(TUN) inaugurated charter service from Djerba to Ostend (Belgium). (TUN) will operate a weekly 737 flight through the end of August.

Airbus (EDS) announced that (TUN) had signed a firm order for 1 A319-100ER (TUN) ordered 1 A319-100ER extended range airplane, becoming the 1st customer for this configuration in Africa. This airplane features an additional center fuel tank to boost range. (TUN) will convert 3 of its in-service A319s into Extended Range versions. It plans to use the type on its Middle East and African routes configured with 16 business class (C) and 90 economy seats (Y). They will be powered by (CFM56-5B6)s. (TUN) operates 12 A320 family airplanes and 3 A300-600s.

December 2006: Employees: 4,738 (including 322 Flight Crew (FC), 744 Cabin Attendants (CA), & 90 Maintenance Technicians (MT)).

March 2007: Starting June 4th, Tunis to Kuwait to Bahrain, using A319s. Starting June 8th, Tunis to Bahrain to Kuwait, using A319s.

April 2007: A319-112 (3096, TS-IMQ) delivery.

October 2007: The Arab Air Carriers Organization (AACO) expressed its disapproval of the European Unions (EU)'s intent to include aviation in its Emissions Trading Scheme and called upon the Arab states to support "the stance against any individual measures, in order to avoid economical imbalance that the global air transport industry ensures without leading to any additional environmental benefit." In a resolution adopted last week at its annual general meeting in Damascus, the (AACO) also offered its support to efforts by (IATA) (ITA) and the Arab Civil Aviation Commission to keep legislative measures relating to the environment within the (ICAO) framework. "Yes, this resolution is clearly directed towards the (EU)'s plan to include aviation in its (ETS) and against each unilateral measure in this global industry," (AACO) Secretary General Abdul Wahab Teffaha confirmed. "Since the environment topic is truly a global issue, there is no point in having individual measures, even if they were of a noble nature," he added, stressing Arab carriers' "excellent" environmental record. He noted that the age of the region's fleet averages fewer than 8 years, and is "by far the youngest fleet in the world." Moreover, he said, Arab airlines operate point-to-point flights, where there is no practical alternative to air transport. (AACO) agreed to set up a monitoring system to audit airlines' environmental performance. Teffaha said "This is a self-monitoring, self-disciplining system, with the aim to find and to implement ways to reduce the effect on the environment. We will now get in touch with (IATA) (ITA) and will soon organize workshops to raise awareness amongst the member airlines and set up training programs to prepare the monitors or environmental experts. We are the 1st in the world to set up such an initiative and invite the world airlines to take similar steps through (IATA) (ITA)."

(AACO) elected a new executive committee, that in turn selected EgyptAir (EGP) Holding Co Chairman Atef Abdelhamid as Chairman for the next 3 years. It also elected (TUN) Chairman & President Nabil Chettaoui as (AACO) president for 2008.

April 2008: Tunisair (TUN) reached agreement with Airbus (EDS) for the purchase of 3 A350 XWB-800s, 3 A330-200s, and 10 A320s. "This acquisition is part of a major fleet development, that will allow (TUN) to prepare for the future, and take up the market opportunities, that exist for our airline," President & (CEO) Nabil Chettaoui said.

(TUN) currently operates 3 A300-600s, 12 A320s, 3 A319s, and 1 A319ER, as well as 4 737-500s and 7 737-600s. The A350s will be used on routes to North America and Asia, with the A330s allowing Tunisair (TUN) to start "new routes to North America in the near future."

May 2008: Tunisair (TUN) as the Tunisian flag carrier, operates jet airplanes over an extensive European and North African network with extensions to the Middle East.

Employees = 3,638.

(IATA) Code: TU - 199. (ICAO) Code: TAR - TUNAIR.

(http://www.tunisair.com.tn). (mail@tunisair.com.tn).

Parent organization/shareholders: Tunisian government (74.42%); & private sector (traded on the Tunis exchange market) (20%).

Subsidiaries: SevenAir (formerly TunInter) (TUI) (83.37%); & Mauritania Airways (MAR) (51%).

Alliances: Air Algerie (ALG); Air Europa (ARE); & Air France (AFA).

Main Base: Tunis Carthage International Airport (TUN).

Domestic, Scheduled Destinations: Djerba; Monastir; Sfax; Tabarka; Tozeur; & Tunis.

International, Scheduled Destinations: Abidjan; Algiers; Amman; Amsterdam; Athens; Bamako; Barcelona; Beirut; Belgrade; Benghazi; Berlin; Bordeaux; Brussels; Budapest; Cairo; Casablanca; Copenhagen; Dakar; Damascus; Dubai; Dusseldorf; Frankfurt; Geneva; Hamburg; Istanbul; Jeddah; Lisbon; London; Luxembourg; Lyons; Madrid; Marseilles; Milan; Munich; Nice; Nouakchott; Paris; Prague; Rome; Salzburg; Stockholm; Strasbourg; Toulouse; Tripoli; Vienna; Warsaw; & Zurich.

June 2008: Amadeus reached 10-year agreements with 12 Arab Air Carriers Org-affiliated airlines for distribution activities in their home markets. 6 members, who have partnered with Amadeus for the past 7 years, will be joined by another 6, when their current distribution agreements expire at year end. Accounting for 66% of the reservations made by travel agencies in the (MENA) region, the 12 airlines are Air Algerie (ALG), Afriqiyah Airways (AQY), EgyptAir (EGP), Etihad Airways (EHD), Kuwait Airways (KUW), Libyan Airlines (LAA), Qatar Airways (QTA), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SVA), Sudan Airways (SUD), Syrian Arab Airlines (SYR), Tunisair (TUN), and Yemen Airways (YEM).

July 2008: Tunisair (TUN) announced a capital increase of +$14 million through the issue of 16.2 million new shares on the Tunis bourse that will be distributed to existing shareholders at a ratio of one new share for every 5 held. Shares carry a nominal value of TND1/$0.85.

At the Farnborough Air Show, Tunisair (TUN) firmed its letter of acceptance signed in April for acquisition of 3 (Trent XWB)-powered A350-800s, 3 A330-200s and 10 A320s. The deal includes options for 2 additional A320s and 1 A350, and is valued at $2 billion. (TUN) will take delivery of 2 A330s in 2012 and 1 in 2013, 2 A350s in 2018 and 1 in 2019, and the A320s will be delivered between 2011 and 2016.

October 2008: The Arab Air Carriers Organization (AACO) elected Saudi Arabian Airlines (SVA) (CEO) Khalid Abdullah Almolhem as its new President, succeeding current Tunisair (TUN) President & (CEO) Nabil Chettaoui.

The Arab Air Carriers Organization (AACO) Secretary General, Abdul Wahab Teffaha said he believes his member airlines are well-positioned to face the current industry and economic crises, and that the turmoil might present opportunities for Arab carriers to emerge stronger and better developed. "There are some dampening elements that may soften the depth of the crisis on the Arab airlines," Teffaha noted during the (AACO)'s annual general meeting in Tunis. He cited strong visiting-friends-and-relatives traffic, resulting from the large number of Arab emigrants, strong labor traffic through the Middle East, North Africa and the rest of Asia, buoyant pilgrim traffic, the new fleets operated by most (AACO) members and modern airport infrastructure as elements that would boost local airlines.

November 2008: Tunisair (TUN), (SITA) and Medsoft, a Tunisian Information Technology (IT) company, have launched Aviation (IT) Services Africa, which will provide all information and computer technology services (both administrative and operational) to the airline over the next 10 years using adapted (SITA) solutions. The venture has launch capital of $3 million and will be held jointly by (TUN) (50%), (SITA) (49%) and Medsoft (1%). "This is the largest outsourcing deal (SITA) has ever signed with an airline," (CEO) Francesco Violante said at the recent Arab Air Carriers Organization meeting in Tunis. (TUN) is the 1st African carrier to fully outsource its (IT). "Many carriers in the region are looking at us to see how this venture will evolve," (TUN) Group President & (CEO) Nabil Chettaoui said, adding that as (TUN) celebrates its 60th anniversary, he hopes it will "become a showcase for the latest aviation technology in a region, which is starting to embrace new technology such as e-ticketing and Web-enabled passenger self-service for booking and check-in."

A specific focus of (TUN)'s (IT) plan will be integrating Flight Operations in order to maximize airplane usage and reduce fuel costs. Passenger management also will be addressed so as to take full advantage of direct-channel ticket sales, reduce costs and "improve Tunisair (TUN)'s overall competitiveness," according to Chettaoui. After an initial upgrade of the airline's systems, which he estimated will take 2 to 3 years, (AISA) intends to begin working with other carriers and airports throughout Africa.

June 2009: 2 737-7L9s (28014, TS-IEA; 28015, TS-IEB), leased to Mauritania Airways (MAR).

June 2010: A320-214 (4344, TS-IMR), ex-(D-AXAS), delivery.

July 2010: 737-4Q8 (27628, TC-TLE "A Guney") leased from Tailwind Airlines (TWI), ex-(N785AS).

November 2010: Rolls-Royce (RRC), the global power systems company, has won an order worth $200 million at list prices from Tunisair (TUN) for (Trent 700) engines to power 3 A330 airplanes. The order, the 1st time (TUN) has selected (Trent) engines, also includes a TotalCare long-term service agreement.

January 2011: Tunis Airport was closed after Tunisia’s military took control of the field and President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali left the country. Several flights destined for Tunis had to be diverted to other destinations, and the closure kept in the country thousands of tourists who were about to leave as the situation became worse. Violent demonstrations have taken place in Tunis and other places over the past month. Protesters demanded Ben Ali’s immediate resignation after 23 years of authoritarian leadership. He is made responsible for social problems, such as high unemployment and increasing prices for food. Earlier, Ben Ali had dissolved the government and called for general elections by indicating he would resign in 2014. But when protests continued, Ben Ali decided to give up and leave the country.

Several thousands of tourists are currently in Tunisia, and at least 1 major tour operator, Thomas Cook, has tried to fly its clients out of the country as a precautionary measure. Several relief flights were dispatched to Tunisia, but with the country’s main airport closed, it was unclear how that operation could be continued. Some European countries have issued warnings saying that non-essential travel to Tunisia should be avoided. Tour operators stopped sending new clients to the country until the situation has stabilized.

May 2011: Tunisair (TUN) took delivery of its 2nd new A320, part of an order placed in April 2008 for 10 A320s, 3 A330-200s and 3 A350-800s. The purchase agreement was signed in July 2008 at the Farnborough Airshow. (TUN) confirmed it will proceed with plans to launch a 2x- weekly Tunis to Montreal service in 2012 upon delivery of the 1st of 3 A330-200s.

June 2011: Tunisair (TUN) named Hamadi Thamri as (CEO), replacing Nabil Chettaoui.

October 2011: 737-7L9 (28014, TS-IEA), returned from lease to Mauritania Airways (MAU).

May 2012: Tunisair (TUN) launched services from Djerba in Tunisia to Tripoli in Libya. (TUN) started flying to Moscow Domodedovo from Enfidha.

(TUN) workers, represented by the Tunisian General Labor Confederation (GCTT) have announced they will strike May 22 and 23 after they were excluded from all meetings between union representatives and the (TUN) administration, several local media outlets reported.

(TUN) has been affected from the drop in tourism during the Arabian Spring.

(UGTT) Secretary General Imed Ferhat told "Tunisia-live.net" he did not expect the strike to succeed since he did not feel the (GCTT) had sufficient support among (TUN)’s 8,400 workers.

July 2012: Tunisair (TUN) has temporarily wet-leased A310-304 (651, CS-TGY) from (SATA) International (SAP) for several weeks until the end of August. The A310-304 is based at Tunis Carthage International (TUN) and will use the airplane on routes to France with a significantly higher demand during the summer months. It is currently scheduled to mainly operate to Lyon St Exupéry (LYS), Marseilles Provence (MRS), Nice Côte d'Azur (NCE) and Paris Orly (ORY) airports.

A320-214 (5204, TS-IMT "AZIZA OTHMANA"), ex-(F-WWIZ), delivery.

November 2012: Tunisair (TUN) Director & Secretary General Rebah Jrad has asked the Tunisian government to finance a restructuring plan that aims to reduce its staff numbers to competitive levels following a $98.3 million USD loss in 2011. (TUN) like many government owned national carriers in the region, is known to be overstaffed and has so far always been faced with major strike threats when its management had previously proposed similar plans.

(TUN) unions are protesting against a new bilateral air services agreement between Tunisia and Qatar that in their views unfairly benefits Qatar Airways (QTA), putting Tunisair (TUN) in competition with (QTA). Tunis already serves as a stop for (QTA)’s daily service with A330-200s and A330-300s from Doha via Tunis to Casablanca Mohamed V International airport (CMN) but (QTA) does not currently have traffic rights between Tunisia and Morocco. It will be able to carry passengers between the 2 countries once it gets 5th freedom rights.

Jasmin Airways (based at Enfidha Hammamet International airport (NBE)) plans to launch charter operations on behalf of tour operators from Enfidha with a fleet of 2 A320-200s from 2013 (Note: The Gulf of Hammamet is to the SE of Tunis-Carthage. Jasmin Airways has failed to receive approval for its plans from the Tunisian government according to press reports in Tunisia with the government reportedly denying to review any new applications for air operator certificates (AOC) from private airlines for the time being. Syphax Airlines ((IATA) Code: FS, based at Sfax Thyna International airport (SFA)) has launched scheduled operations with 2 A319-100s earlier this month in competition with state owned Tunisair (TUN)) causing a wide range of protests from Tunisair (TUN) employees.

April 2013: On April 14, Tunisair (TUN) linked the capitals of Tunisia in North Africa and Burkina Faso, a land-locked nation in West Africa, with a 3x-weekly A320 operation. While 1 of the weekly flights operates direct, the remaining 2x-weekly services are flown via Bamako (BKO) in Mali. Flights on the 2,956 km route between Tunis (TUN) and Ouagadougou (OUA) face no direct competition from any other carrier.

Tunisair (TUN) sees traffic rebound 20% in 2012; plans long-haul flights to America, Canada and South Africa. After seeing passenger numbers fall by 14% during 2011, as a result of the ‘Arab Spring’, which resulted in significant social and political change, Tunisia’s national airline, (TUN) rebounded strongly in 2012 with passenger numbers jumping +20% to 3.82 million. In February, (TUN) accepted delivery of its latest A320, to grow the fleet to 34 aircraft in total. It joins 3 long-haul A300s, 11 737s (737-500s and 737-600s), 15 other A320s, and 4 A319s. According to Airbus (EDS) data, (TUN) has a further 6 A320s on order that have yet to be delivered, as well as 3 A330-200s and 3 A350-800s. Most of these will be used to replace existing airplanes, many of which are >15 years old.

SEE ATTACHED - - "TUN - PASSENGER GROWTH."

Tunisair (TUN)’s network is focussed on Europe, West Africa and the Middle East. Analysis of (TUN)’s scheduled services this summer (it also operates an extensive charter program) reveals that Paris is the leading destination, and that (TUN)’s 3 routes to Paris Orly from Djerba, Monastir and Tunis, account for fully one-sixth of (TUN)’s total weekly (ASK)s.

SEE ATTACHED - - "TUN - TOP 12 ROUTES - 2013-04."

Destinations in Saudi Arabia, Morocco and Senegal join the 2 Paris routes in the top 5 biggest routes for Tunisair (TUN). No other western European destination ranks in the top 12. Not many airlines have 2 destinations in Libya among their top 12 routes, but (TUN) has 2x-daily flights to Benghazi, and 3x-daily to Tripoli.

Future plans include New York and South Africa.

(TUN) has revealed that it has significant plans to develop its hub operations from Tunis.

Flights to Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso began this month, while 3x-weekly services to Bologna in Italy are slated to start on May 3. Start dates for the other new routes have not yet been revealed. Long-haul flights to Canada are planned to start in 2014, suggesting that that may be when (TUN) envisages receiving the 1st of the 3 A330s it has on order. These will replace (TUN)’s existing A300s, and will also probably be used to enter the USA and South African markets.

(TUN) commenced low-frequency services on its only route to the Russian Federation on April 26, when it launched weekly frequencies from Monastir (MIR), located on the central coast of Tunisia to St Petersburg (LED). (TUN) has already announced plans to double the frequency to 2x-weekly beginning May 17. All flights are carried out using A320s.

May 2013: Tunisair (TUN) commenced services on the 5th Italian route it offers from its Tunis (TUN) base on May 3rd. (TUN), which already operates services to Rome Fiumicino (14x-weekly flights), Milan Malpensa (10x-), Venice (6x-) and Palermo (3x-), added Bologna (BLQ) to the list of Italian airports it has on offer from the Tunisian capital. 3x-weekly flights are offered on the 900 km route and operated using A320 family airplanes.

June 2013: Tunisair (TUN) appears to be the latest carrier to abandon the A350-800, bringing the backlog for the type to <90 airplanes. (TUN) had ordered 3 of the type in July 2008, along with 3 A330s and 10 A320s.

But Airbus's order figures to the end of May no longer list the Tunisair (TUN) A350s. While several A350-800 customers have converted to larger variants of the A350, the Airbus (EDS) data indicates that (TUN) has cancelled outright.

The change takes the A350-800's backlog down to 89 airplanes, but Airbus (EDS) insists that the variant will remain part of the A350 family.

Tunisair (TUN) has yet to confirm its apparent decision and clarify its reasons. (TUN) recently put a group of older airplanes, including three A300s, up for sale. Its A330 order remains on (EDS)'s books.

The amendment effectively offsets the only order Airbus (EDS) recorded in May, for 3 EasyJet (EZY) A320s, and leaves the net order figure for 2013 unchanged at 493.

Several aerospace firms have established operations in Tunisia and, despite the country's political unrest sparking sweeping revolutions in other Arab states in 2011, it escaped relatively unscathed.

But Airbus (EDS) Executive VP Programs Tom Williams noted, during a briefing in Toulouse on June 5th, that (EDS) had encountered problems with suppliers which were trying to source components from Tunisia.

He says that, in some cases, (EDS) had to take "extraordinary actions" to avoid disturbance in its production line, and "repatriate" components back into Europe.

November 2013: Tunisair (TUN) has begun 2x-weekly flights between Tunis (TUN) and Tobruk (TOB) in Libya. The 1,370 km route, which commenced on November 12th, will be operated on Tuesdays and Thursdays by (TUN)’s 126Y-seat, all economy class 737-600s. Tobruk becomes (TUN)’s 6th destination in Libya joining Tripoli (28x-weekly flights), Benghazi (21x-weekly flights), Misrata (6x-weekly flights), Beida (4x-weekly flights) and Sebha (2x-weekly flights). Competition on the Tobruk service is provided by Libyan Airlines (LAA) with 2x-weekly flights.

March 2014: Russia’s and Tunisia’s aviation authorities have agreed to sign a new air service agreement, but it will not change the current situation regarding flights from Moscow and Saint Petersburg.

Both countries agreed to keep in force frequency entitlement of 7x-weekly for Saint Petersburg per specified route for each side and 10x- weekly for Moscow per specified route for each side, according to the document published by Russia’s Federal Air Transport Agency, Rosaviatsia.

Industry observers say negotiations between 2 countries were motivated by Tunisian carriers’ desire to add more flights to their biggest markets: Moscow and Saint Petersburg. But Russian authorities did not agree with that because Russian airlines do not want to expand the number of frequencies on Tunis destinations.

The authorities also agreed to establish up to 3 scheduled flights per week for each side, in total to/from 4 cities in Russia: Rostov on Don, Kazan, Krasnodar, Sochi. 2 cities were added as possible destinations in Tunisia: Tabarka and Tozeur. 2 more points will be specified later.

Charter services between the two countries will be allowed on request by designated carriers within frameworks of national air regulations. “Charter services should not jeopardize scheduled services on the agreed routes,” the document stated.

June 2014: Koussai Merbet Head International Affairs & Alliances was appointed Director Commercial, Corporate & Industry Affairs for the African Airlines Association (AFRAA).

August 2014: The Tunisian Ministry of Transport has banned all flights originating from Libyan airports from its airspace until further notice over security concerns. Since the overthrow of the Gaddafi regime in 2011, central government control in Libya has steadily weakened, with rival groups battling for control of the oil-rich North African nation. The situation has worsened in recent months, with effectively a full-scale civil war now raging between several factions.

The main airport in the capital, Tripoli, has been the scene of some of the heaviest fighting, with reports and images from the scene indicating that several airplanes belonging to the 2 national carriers (Libyan Airlines (LAA) and Afriqiyah Airways (AQY)) have been destroyed or damaged. Islamist rebels were reported to have gained control of the facility.

According to multiple media reports, the decision to ban flights from Libya, followed warnings from foreign intelligence agencies that rebels might attempt to use airplanes captured at Tripoli as suicide bombs.

September 2014: Tunisair (TUN) began flights to its 2nd airport in the UK with the introduction of weekly (Mondays) flights from Tunis (TUN) to London Gatwick (LGW) on September 1st, a service moved from London’s primary gateway (London Heathrow). The 1,791 km airport pair will be operated until October 25th, utilizing (TUN)’s 162-seat A320s. No other airline serves this route. (TUN) will maintain its 5x-weekly flights from its Tunis hub to London Heathrow (LHR).

December 2014: Tunisair ((IATA) Code: TU, based at Tunis) (TUN) will commence A330-200s operations with effect from June 2, 2015. Earlier this year, Managing Director, Salwa Sghaïer, said (1631) and (1641) would arrive from Airbus (EDS) in May and June of next year with a third due later on.

Initial destinations will include Dubai International, Jeddah, Dakar, Istanbul Atatürk, Nouakchott, Paris Orly, and Montréal Trudeau.

More interestingly, (TUN), the Tunisian national carrier, has also set a September 29, 2015 date for the start of its maiden transatlantic services to Montréal Trudeau, Canada, where it will compete with local rival, Syphax Airlines ((IATA) Code: FS, based at Sfax) (SYA).

January 2015: Tunisair (TUN) is considering the launch of a low-cost carrier (LCC) in a bid to maintain market share when its skies become liberalized.

June 2015: Tunisair (TUN) took delivery of its 1st A330-200 (1631, TS-IFM) on June 9. The wide body jet, 1 of 3 on order from Airbus Industrie (EDS) will make its commercial debut on June 11.

(TUN), the Tunisian national carrier plans to use the airplane on flights from Tunis to Dubai International, Istanbul Atatürk, Jeddah, Lyon St Exupéry, Madinah, Nice, Nouakchott, and Paris Orly.

It will also be used to roll out Tunisair (TUN)'s maiden transatlantic services to Montréal Trudeau later on in September.

September 2015: Tunisair ((IATA) Code: TU, based at Tunis) (TUN) and Air Algérie ((IATA) Code: AH, based at Algier) (ALG) have strengthened their existing relationship with the signing of a framework partnership agreement in Algiers on September 8, 2015.

Under the deal, the carriers will benefit from enhanced synergies in the spheres of airplane maintenance, flight operations (including aircraft chartering), joint purchasing, and staff training. The two carriers have also pledged to cooperate in flight scheduling, commercial passenger and cargo agreements, organizational exchanges and Information Technology (IT).

Currently, Tunisair (TUN) serves Algier, Oran, and Setif from its Tunis hub, while Air Algérie (ALG) serves Tunis from Algiers and El Oued.

(TUN) currently operates 33 airplanes to 34 countries, and serves 70 destinations, 124 routes and 68 daily flights.

December 2015: Tunisia's Minister of Transport, Mahmoud Ben Romdhane said the government is planning to merge Tunisair Express ((IATA) Code: UG, based at Tunis) into Tunisair (TUN) in a bid to improve the former's operational efficiency.

Addressing the North African country's Assembly of People's Representatives (ARP) Romdhane said Tunisair Express (TUN)'s operations suffered from excessive delays brought on by a shortage of reliable aircraft.

April 2016: Tunisair (TUN) has scheduled its maiden transatlantic services to begin on June 18 with 2x-weekly, Tunis to Montréal (YUL) Airbus A330-200 service.

July 2017: JorAMCo was selected by Tunisair (TUN) to perform "C" checks on 2 Airbus A330s.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
TUN-727-200.jpg
TUN-737-6H3
TUN-737-6H3-N.jpg
TUN-737-6H3.jpg
TUN-737-7Q8.jpg
TUN-737.jpg
TUN-747-128
TUN-A300-605R.jpg
TUN-A319-114
TUN-A320
TUN-A320-200 - 2014-12
TUN-A320-211-2001
TUN-A320-211.jpg
TUN-A330-200 - 2015-06.jpg

October 2017:

0 727-2H3 (JT8D) (1171-21179, /75 TS-JHR; 1210-21235, /76 TS-JHT; 1252-21318, /77 TS-JHU; 1271-21320, /77 TS-JHW), 21179; 21239; 21318; & 21320; ST (SYV) 2001-06. 21973 LST (EEC) TIL 2001-07. 22624 TRANSFERRED TO (TUI) 2001-08. ALL ST (SYV).

0 737-2H3 (JT8D-9A) (607-21973, /79 TS-IOC "SALAMMBO"), ST (AEV), 126Y.

0 737-2H3C (JT8D-9A) (615-21974, /79 TS-IOD "BULLA REGIA"), LST (MEF). ST (AEV). 126Y/FREIGHTER.

0 737-2H3 (JT8D-17) (758-22624, /81 TS-IOE "ZARSIS;" 776-22625, /81 TS-IOF "SOUSSE") WET-LST (SUD) 2002-10. ST (AEV). 10F, 94Y.

0 737-33A (CFM56-3B1) (1284-23626, /86 EC-IFV), (HLB) WET-LSD 2004-07. RTND. 148Y.

1 737-4Q8 (CFM56-3) (27628, TC-TLE "A GUNEY"), TAILWIND AIRLINES (TWI) LSD 2010-07. EX-(N785AS). 168Y.

0 737-448 (CFM56-3) (1742-24474, /89 SU-HMD), (LXR) SEMI-WET-LSD 2000-10. RTND.

4 737-5H3 (CFM56-3C1) (2253-26639, /92 "SFAX" TS-IOG; 2474-26640; /93 TS-IOH "HAMMAMET;" 2583-27257, /94 TS-IOI "MAHDIA;" 2701-27912, /95 TS-IOJ "MONASTIR"), 126Y.

7 737-6H3 (CFM56-7B22) (268-29496, /99 TS-IOK "KAIROUAN;" 282-29497, /99 TS-IOL "TOZEUR-NEFTA;" 310-29498, /99 TS-IOM CARTHAGE;" 510-29499, /00 TS-ION "UTIQUE," 2000-04; 543-29500, /00 TS-IOP "EL JEM;" 563-29501, /00 TS-IOQ "BIZERTE," 2000-05; 816-29502, /01 TS-IOR "TAHAR HADDAD" 2001-04), 126Y.

1 737-7H3 BBJ (CFM56-7B26) (348-29149, /99 TS-IOO "REPUBLIC OF TUNISIA"), EX-(N5573L), GOVT TRANSPORT OPS - SEE (RTN). WITH WINGLETS. VIP.

2 737-7L9 (CFM56-7B) (766-28014, TS-IEA; 785-28015, TS-IEB), LST MAURITANIA AIRWAYS (MAR) 2009-06. 28014; RF (MAU) 2011-10.

18 ORDERS 737-700 (CFM56-7B):

0 737-85H (CFM56-7B) (186-29445, /99 OY-SEI), (STR) WET-LSD TIL 2001-10.

25 ORDERS 737-800 (CFM56-7B):

11 ORDERS 787-8 DREAMLINER.

0 DC-9-32 (47563; 47571), (JAT) LSD, (TUI) OPS, (TUN) MAINT. BOTH RTND.

0 DC-10-30 (CF6-50E2) (234-46959), (MAS) LSD 1998-07. RTND.

0 A300-600, (EAD) 2 YR LSD 1998-12. RTND.

0 A300B4-203 (CF6-50C2) (188, /82 - "AMILCAR"), 1 RTND AIRBUS (EDS) 2001-10. 188 SCRAPPED. 24C, 241Y.

3 A300B4-605R (CF6-80C2A5) (558, /90 TS-IPA "SIDI BOU SAID;" 563, /90 TS-IPB "TUNIS"), EX-(EAD), (505, /89 TS-IPC "AMILCAR", EX-(SUD), 2000-12), AIFS LSD, 28C, 235Y.

1 A310-304 (CF6-80C2A2) (651, /92 CS-TGV "S. MIGUEL"), EX-(AFR), AIRBUS LSD 2000-03, (SAP) WET-LSD 2012-07 - 2012-08. 18C, 204Y.

1 A319-112ER (CFM56-5B6/P) (3096, /07 TS-IMQ "ALYSSA"), WITH EXTRA CENTER FUEL TANK. 16C, 90Y.

2 A319-114 (CFM56-5A5) (869 /98 TS-IMJ "EL KANTAOUI;" 880, /98 TS-IMK "KERKENAH"). TO CONVERT TO ER VERSION. 144Y.

1 A319-114ER (CFM56-5A5) (1479, /01 TS-IMO "HANNIBAL"), WITH EXTRA CENTER FUEL TANK. 16C, 90Y.

1 +9/2 ORDERS A320-200 (CFM56-5A1), 2011-05.

4 A320-211 (CFM56-5A1) (119, /90 "FARHAT HACHED;" 123, /90 "TABARKA;" 124, /90 "7 NOVEMBRE"; 205, /91 "KHEREDDINE"), 25C, 120Y.

8 +3 ORDERS A320-211 (CFM56-5A1) (370, /92 TS-IMF "DJERBA;" 390, /94 TS-IMG "ABOU EL KACEM CHEBBI;" 402, /94 TS-IMH "ALI BELHAOUANE;" 511, /94 TS-IMI "JUGHURTA;" 958, /99 TS-IML "GAFSA EL KSAR;" 975, /99 TS-IMM "LE BARDO;" 1187, /00 TS-IMN "IBN KHALDOUN;" 1700, /02 TS-IMP "LA GALITE"), 390; HAS "WORLD CUP SOCCER 2006" MARKINGS 2006-05. 174Y.

0 A320-214 (1370, PH-BMD) (DUT) WET-LSD 2004-07. RTND.

1 A320-214 (4344, TS-IMR), 2010-06. EX-(D-AXAS).

1 A320-214 (5204, TS-IMT "AZIZA OTHMANA"), EX-(F-WWIZ), 2012-07.

0 A321-131 (591, OO-CPS), (ILF) LSD 2000-07, RTND (BIA) 2000-09.

2 +1 ORDER A330-200 (TRENT 700) (1631, /15 TS-IFM, 2015-05; 1641, 2015-06).

3/1 ORDERS (2018-02) A350-XWB-800 (TRENT XWB):

1 ATR 42-300 (PW120) (245, /92 TS-LBA "ALYSSA"), WET-LST (TUI) OPS, MAINT BY (TUN). 48Y.

2 ATR 72-202 (PW124B) (258, /92 TS-LVV " HABIB BOURGUIBA;" 281, /92 TS-LVC "TAHAR HADDAD"), WET-LST (TUI) OPS, MAINT BY (TUN). 70Y.

Management:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
TUN-CEO

HAMADI THAMRI, CHAIRMAN (2011-06).

SALWA SGHAIER, MANAGING DIRECTOR.

REBAH JRAD, DIRECTOR & SECRETARY GENERAL.

HACHEMI SIOUD, VP FLIGHT OPERATIONS (TUNODTU).

ADEL GAIDA, VP FINANCE.

MOHAMED THAMRI, VP ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE (2000-06) (TUNOPTU).

MONCEF BADIS, VP COMMERCIAL.

YOLDES ZARRAD, VP HUMAN RESOURCES (HR).

FAOUZI KAABACHI, VP TRANSPORT.

KOUSSAI MERBET, HEAD INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS & ALLIANCES
koussai was appointed Director Commercial-Corporate & Industry Affairs for the African Airlines Association (AFRAA) (2014-06).

CAPTAIN ABDELLATIF MECHERGUI, DIRECTOR FLIGHT OPERATIONS (TUNODTU) (1/02).

CAPTAIN ABDELFETTAH BAYAR, DIRECTOR FLIGHT SAFETY (TUNSVTU).

CAPTAIN HEDI CHLIOUI, CHIEF PILOT.

CAPTAIN A BERGAOUI, CHIEF PILOT 737.

BECHIR BENSASSI, DIRECTOR NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

KARIM GUEDDICHE, DIRECTOR SALES.

CHEDLY DAMERGI, DIRECTOR MAINTENANCE.

FAYCAL CHEIKH-ROUHOU, DIRECTOR CENTRAL MAINTENANCE & ENGINEERING.

LOTFI HAJRI, DIRECTOR QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) & QUALITY CONTROL (QC) (TUNOPTU).

HAMADI NABLI, QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT.

ALI ALLOUCHA, QUALITY ASSURANCE (QA) AVIONICS DEPARTMENT.

CHELDY DAMERGI, MAINTENANCE DIRECTOR (2001-10), EX-(TUI).

Z CHETOUANE, MAINTENANCE MANAGER TUNINTER (TUI) (1999-11).

 
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