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Name: UNITED STATES NAVY
7JetSet7 Code: USN
Status: Operational
Region: NORTH AMERICA
City: TULSA
Country: USA
Employees 77
Web: navair.navy.mil
Email:
Telephone: +1 (405) 739-3253
Fax: +1 (405) 739-3707
Sita:
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
USN-2003-11 - LOCKHEED P-3C
USN-2003-11 - P-3
USN-2004-06
USN-2004-06-A
USN-2004-06-B
USN-2004-06-C
USN-2004-06-D
USN-2004-06-E
USN-2004-12 - 737-800 MMA
USN-2004-12 - C-9
USN-2013-04 - 7TH P-8A POSEIDON

TRANSPORT JET AIRPLANE TRAINING BASE. 707'S DESIGNATED TC-18F. OPERATES OUT OF TINKER AIR FORCE BASE (AFB), OKLAHOMA.

USA (United States of America) was established in 1776, it covers an area of 9,363,123 sq km, its population is 280 million, its capital city is Washington DC, and its official language is English.

JUNE 1998: 4 ORDERS 737-700C'S (C-40A) (DECEMBER 2000) FOR NAVY UNIQUE FLEET ESSENTIAL AIRLIFT REPLACEMENT AIRCRAFT PROGRAM. PLANS TO REPLACE FLEET OF 29 C-9'S WITH 737-700'S. 1 DC-9-31 (JT8D-9A) (47547), EX-SPIRIT AIRLINES (SPR).

NOVEMBER 1999: BOEING (TBC) WICHITA STARTS ASSEMBLY OF 1ST 737-700C (C-40A) WITH 11 X 7 FT MAIN DECK CARGO DOOR. IT IS CERTIFIED FOR OPERATIONS IN 3 CONFIGURATIONS: ALL-PASSENGER (PAX) 121Y; ALL-CARGO UP TO 8 PALLETS; COMBI WITH 70 PAX & UP TO 3 CARGO PALLETS.

JUNE 2000: 5TH ORDER 737-700C (C-40A) FOR ITS NAVY UNIQUE FLEET ESSENTIAL AIRLIFT REPLACEMENT AIRCRAFT PROGRAM.

AUGUST 2000: 2ND 737-700C (C40A) "THE CLIPPER" DELIVERY.

NOVEMBER 2000: 737-7AF (30200, 165831) DELIVERY. 1 737-700 (29979, 165829) DELIVERY.

JANUARY 2001: 1 ORDER (APRIL 2001) C-40A (737-700C).

FEBRUARY 2001: $28M, 10-YEAR MAINTENANCE SUPPORT CONTRACT FOR USN/USF C-40A'S TO DELTA AIRLINES (DAL).

MARCH 2001: 1 737-700QC (30781, 165832).

SEPTEMBER 2001: $5.7 MILLION CONTRACT TO DELTA AIRLINES (DAL) TO PROVIDE C-40A (737-700) MAINTENANCE TRAINING AT ATLANTA, THROUGH JANUARY 2006.

FEBRUARY 2002: $123 MILLION CONTRACT AND 1ST INSTALLATION OF 737NG GLASS COCKPIT IN 16 E-6B'S (707'S).

April 2003: 1 order (May 2003) C-40A (737-700 Combi).

December 2003: 8th order for C-40A (modified 737-700 Combi) for delivery in 1st Quarter 2005.

June 2004: Awards the Boeing (TBC)-led industry team including (CFM) International, Northrop Grumman (GRU), Raytheon (RAY), & Smiths Aerospace, a $3.89 billion contract to build the Multi-mission Maritime Airplane (MMA). The platform is based on the 737-700IGW.
The initial contract calls for the team to produce 7 test airplanes during the program's System Development & Demonstration (SSD) phase. The total program, is estimated to be worth about $20 billion, calls for up to 108 airplanes to be purchased by the Navy (USN) to replace its aging fleet of 223 P-3 airplanes.

Northrop Grumman (GRU)'s Baltimore-based Electronic Systems sector will provide the electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensor, the directional infrared countermeasure system, and the electronic support measures system. (GRU)'s Mission Systems sector, based in Reston, Virginia will develop data links for (MMA). (GRU)'s Integrated Systems sector, based in El Segundo, California will support the mission planning effort.

Raytheon (RAY) will provide an upgraded APS-137 Maritime Surveillance Radar & Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) solutions. (RAY) is also offering its revolutionary (GPS) Anti-Jam, Integrated Friend or Foe, and Towed Decoy Self-Protection Suites, and the airplane's Broadcast Information System (BIS) and secure Satcom capability.

Smiths Aerospace supplies both the Flight Management and Stores Management systems. The Flight Management System provides a truly integrated open architecture that is (CNS/ATM) compliant along with an inherent growth plan for upgrades. The Stores Management System provides a comprehensive system for the electronic control of the integrated weapons management. This system is designed with standards to accommodate current and future precision weapons.

November 2006: Boeing (TBC) is working with the US Air Force (USF) to show how network-centric computer tools can streamline airborne battle management, using E-3A Sentry Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) airplanes as a test platform.

The intent, according to (TBC) (AWACS) Development Manager, Kevin Jones is to help the Air Force (USF) prioritize its investment in net-centric technology. The two-year, (TBC)-funded Cooperative Research & Development Agreement (CREDA) is not, however, part of the airplane’s current Block 40/45 upgrade. “What this does is give us the ability to look at the problem of net-centric warfare and quantify the specific military benefits,” Jones said. “A lot of it has to do with basic infrastructure, like quality of service and level of connectivity. We have to determine the nature and quantity of the data we want to move and how fast it has to travel to support the mission.” The (AWACS)-based research has centered on the replacement of voice communications with digital relays in a bid to speed up time-sensitive targeting. In addition, operator displays are being enhanced with data from sources besides the airplane’s onboard radar. The package includes “decision aids,” such as color-coded symbols denoting target status as it evolves in combat.

One likely scenario involves a potential enemy target broadcasting radar signals — known in the early warning business as an “emitter.” An airplane with a passive (ISR) system locates the site and conveys the information to the Coalition Air Operations Center (CAOC) on the ground. The (CAOC) requests more information and adds the target to a list. Can Special Operations Forces or space-based (ISR) assets identify it? (AWACS) operators watch the scenario develop, while the target moves higher on the list. Using the new net-centric tools, they match airborne strike assets with the target. If a formation of F-15E strike airplanes was on call, for example, the (AWACS) could verify their fuel status and arrange midair refueling, if needed.
“Using forward-based radar sensors to extend (AWACS) visibility, gives us much earlier target identification and faster reaction time,” Jones said.

Software and other features proven during the (CREDA), if developed, could reach the (AWACS) fleet by 2013, according to (TBC).

Another candidate for the net-centric treatment could be the Boeing P-8A, a 737-derived airplane slated to be the US Navy (USN)’s next antisubmarine warfare/(ISR) airplanes. “For now, we’re focused on supporting the (AWACS) modernization road map, of which the network is key,” Jones said. “It shortens the kill chain and increases bombs on target.” Based on the Boeing 707 airliner, the E-3A (USE) is in its fourth decade with the Air Force (USF), which operates 33 of the type. (NATO) has 17 (AWACS) airplanes in service, while Britain’s Royal Air Force (RAF) has seven. Saudi Arabia and France fly five and four, respectively.

Block 40/45 — the most recent (AWACS) upgrade — incorporates numerous enhancements, including replacement of 1970s-vintage mainframe computers and displays with modern devices.

March 2012: 737-8FV (40810, N398DS), delivery as (168430).

April 2012: 737-8FV (40811, N507DS), delivery.

July 2012: 737-8FV (40812, N516DV), delivery as (168432).

April 2013: Boeing [TBC] handed over the seventh production P-8A Poseidon to the US Navy (USN) on schedule March 29, marking the first delivery from the second low-rate initial production contract awarded in November 2011.

The maritime patrol aircraft departed Boeing Field in Seattle for Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida, where it joined six P-8As currently being used to train Navy crews. “This is our second P-8A delivery of 2013, and we’ll continue to provide the Navy with new Poseidon airplanes at a rate of nearly one a month,” said Rick Heerdt, Boeing VP & P-8 Program Manager. “We’ve got a full factory of P-8As for the US Navy (USN) and P-8I airplanes for India, and we’re working side-by-side with both customers to introduce the airplane’s advanced capabilities into their fleets.”

Boeing (TBC) is on contract to build and support 24 P-8A airplanes as part of three (LRIP) contracts awarded in 2011 and 2012. The Navy plans to purchase 117 P-8As, which are based on the Next-Generation Boeing 737-800 platform. The versatile multi-mission airplane provides broad long-range maritime patrol capabilities (anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) and will replace the Navy P-3 fleet.

SEE ATTACHED - - USN-2013-04 - 7TH P 8A POSEIDON."

August 2013: Boeing (TBC) announced a $1.98 billion contract from the US Navy for 13 of its P-8A Poseidon airplanes, bringing the total order number to 37 of the 117 P-8As that it is expected to purchase.

The P-8A, an anti-submarine variant of the Boeing Next-Generation 737-800 commercial airplane, is part of the Navy's modernization effort, as it looks to replace its current fleet of P-3 airplanes.

According to Rick Heerdt, Program Manager of Boeing's P-8 division, the P-8A program is "on budget and on schedule and the Navy will stand up initial operational capability" of the airplane by the end of the year.

The P-8As are assembled within the same facility where Boeing (TBC) produces commercial 737 variants. Companies included on Boeing's P-8A industry team include (CFM) International, Northrop Grumman (GRU), Raytheon (RAY), Spirit AeroSystems, (BAE) Systems and (GE) Aviation (GEC).

October 2013: Boeing (TBC) delivered the 12th production P-8A Poseidon on schedule on October 25, enhancing the long-range maritime patrol capabilities of the US Navy (USN). The P-8A departed Boeing Field in Seattle for Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida, where it joined the other Poseidon airplanes being used to train Navy crews.

December 2013: The US Navy (USN)'s first new advanced maritime patrol and reconnaissance airplane, Boeing's P-8A Poseidon, has arrived in Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, military officials said.

The P-8A is a replacement for the aging P-3C, and marks the first time since 1962 that the Navy has deployed a new airplane to be operated by a patrol squadron for maritime surveillance.

Initial deployment comes following the Naval Air Systems Command's (NAVAIR) recent announcement that the P-8A achieved initial operational capability (IOC). “There has never been a greater need for a new patrol and reconnaissance airplane now that the aging P-3 is nearing the end of its life cycle," said Rear Admiral Matt Carter, Commander Patrol & Reconnaissance group for NAVAIR.

The P-8A is a multi-mission military derivative using the Boeing Next-Generation 737 airframe, with the fuselage of a 737-800 and the wings of a 737-900. Powered by (CFM56-7) engines, the P-8A features flight management and storage management systems from GE Aviation (GEC) and a directional infrared countermeasures system supplied by Northrop Grumman (GRU).

Carter said the P-8A, along with the Triton unmanned airplane system (UAS) will strengthen situational awareness for maritime surveillance pilots (FC) as countries continue to build and purchase "advanced, quiet and extremely hard to find submarines."

Another four airplanes are due to arrive in the region this month, as the War Eagles of Patrol Squadron 16 (VP 16) deployed with a total of six P-8As. Based in Jacksonville, Florida, the VP-16 is currently phasing the P-3C out of its fleet to become the first P-8A squadron.

March 2014: The US Navy (USN) made a new order for 16 Boeing P-8A maritime patrol jets in a $2.1 billion deal; Boeing (TBC) starts full-rate production.

August 2014: Boeing (TBC) has won an initial contract worth $296 million to buy parts needed for production of 12 more P-8A "spy" planes, including eight for the US Navy (USN), and four for the government of Australia, the Pentagon announced.

The contract, which kicks off funding for a second batch of full-rate production jets, runs through April 2018, the Defense Department said in its daily digest of major weapons contracts.

Boeing won a $2.1 billion contract in February to build the first batch of 16 P-8A Poseidon long-range maritime spy planes for the (USN), which came on top of $300 million in funds awarded earlier for certain materials that take longer to procure, such as titanium.

The P-8A, based on Boeing’s 737-800 commercial airplane, will replace the US Navy (USN)’s P-3 spy planes, which have been in service for more than >40 years.

The 15th P-8A Poseidon built by Boeing (TBC) arrived at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida, where it is intended to help expand the US Navy (USN)’s long-range maritime patrol capabilities.

The airplane, delivered on schedule on July 31st, joined the other Poseidon airplanes being used to train Navy crews in preparation for deployment.

The delivery follows Patrol Squadron (VP)-16’s recent return home from the P-8A’s first operational deployment. The ‘War Eagles’ of VP-16 were deployed for seven months, operating out of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. They were recently replaced by the ‘Mad Foxes’ of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5.

Boeing (TBC) is currently on contract to build and support 53 P-8A airplanes. The Navy plans to purchase 117 P-8As, which are based on the Next-Generation Boeing 737-800 platform. The versatile multi-mission airplane provides anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities and will replace the Navy P-3 fleet.

May 2015: "Boeing Marks First International Sale of P-8A Training System" By Rob Vogelaar, aviationnews.eu, May 8, 2015.

Boeing [TBC] will provide the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) (RAA) with a complete training system for the P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol airplane under a contract that also includes the sale of four P-8A training systems for the US Navy (USN). This combined domestic and foreign military sale further strengthens the growing partnership between the (USN) and the (RAA) on the P-8 program.

The system utilizes simulators to train pilots (FC) and mission crews to operate the airplane, its sensors, communications and weapons systems without relying on costly live flights.

“Boeing (TBC) will deliver a seamless and comprehensive training solution for our customers’ pilots (FC) and mission crews” said Tom Shadrach, Boeing P-8 Program Manager on the Training Systems and Government Services team. “It will prepare them to use the world’s most advanced anti-surface and anti-submarine capabilities for any mission, at any time.”

Boeing (TBC) currently provides P-8A aircrew training devices, electronic classrooms and courseware for the Navy at its 165,000-square-foot Integrated Training Center (ITC) at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, where the goal is to shift majority of the training to the (ITC).

In February 2014, the Australian government approved the acquisition of eight P-8As and supporting infrastructure to include training and initial spares and support equipment. Airplane deliveries are scheduled to begin in 2017, the P8-A training system is expected to be delivered to Australia in 2018.

August 2015: "Boeing (TBC) Receives $1.49 Billion Contract for 13 P-8A Poseidon Airplanes" by (ATW) Rob Vogelaar, August 28, 2015.

US Navy orders 2nd full-rate production lot, including first airplanes for Australia.

Boeing (TBC) will provide the first P-8A Poseidon maritime surveillance airplanes for Australia and additional P-8As for the US Navy, following a $1.49 billion contract award from the Navy for 13 airplanes.

The order includes nine airplanes for the US Navy and four Poseidon airplanes for the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) (RAA), a long-time partner to the US Navy on P-8A development.

“By working together since the early stages of P-8A development, the USA and Australia have created one airplane configuration that serves the needs of both countries,” said Captain Scott Dillon, US Navy P-8 Program Manager. “The USA and Australian P-8As will be able to operate with each other effectively and affordably for decades to come.”

This latest award puts Boeing (TBC) on contract to build the Navy’s second lot of full-rate production airplanes, bringing the US Navy’s fleet total to 62 P-8As. (TBC) has delivered 28 Poseidons to date.

“Delivering premier airplanes on schedule and on cost has become a hallmark of the P-8 program,” said James Dodd, Boeing VP & General Manager of Mobility, Surveillance & Engagement. “We look forward to building on (TBC)’s long-standing relationship with Australia by providing the quality, value and capability of the P-8A.”

Based on Boeing’s Next-Generation 737-800 commercial airplane, the P-8A offers the worlds’ most advanced anti-submarine, anti-surface warfare and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities. The Navy has deployed the first two P-8A patrol squadrons since operations started in 2013.

Australia’s participation in the P-8 program began in 2009 when the government signed the first in a series of memorandums of understanding to work with the US Navy on system design and development. The US Navy and the (RAAF) also established a joint program office that operates at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland.

Production of the first Australian P-8A will begin later this year, with delivery to the (RAAF) scheduled for 2016. Boeing (TBC) will also provide the (RAAF) with a complete training system for the P-8A, using simulators to train pilots (FC) and mission crews to operate the airplane, its sensors, communications and weapons systems without relying on costly live flights.

November 2015: News Item A-1: "Northrop Grumman up Upgrade SATCOM Capability for Navy E-6B Airborne Command Post" by www.militaryaerospace.com John Keller Editor, November 3, 2015.

PATUXENT RIVER NAS, Maryland. November 3, 2015: Satellite communications (SATCOM) experts at Northrop Grumman Corporation (GRU) will build and test advanced (SATCOM) capability for the US Navy (USN) (E-6B) Mercury strategic airborne command post & communications relay aircraft under terms of an $12.2 million contract modification announced November 6.

Officials of the Naval Air Systems Command at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, Maryland, are asking (GRU) Information Systems segment in Herndon, Virginia, to provide modifications to the (E-6B) aircraft involving the Multi-Role Tactical Common Data Link (MR-TCDL) B-Kit #3, B-Kit #4, and B-Kit Spares #2.

The (MR-TCDL) provides (Ku) line-of-sight and (Ka SATCOM) systems for the (E6-B). The data link includes two (Ku) line-of-sight channels and one (Ka) satellite communications channel. Other equipment includes power conditioning, cooling, electrical, and network distribution. The system also has equipment that interfaces Block II B kits into the existing (E6-B) avionics architecture.

The Boeing (TBC) (E-6) Mercury is an airborne command post and communications relay aircraft that conveyed instructions from the National Command Authority to deployed Navy nuclear ballistic missile submarines, as well as to land-based atomic missiles and nuclear-armed bombers.

* Related: (ARINC) to modify four Navy (E-6B) Mercury planes for Rockwell Collins

The (E-6B) provides command and control of USA nuclear forces, should ground-based control become inoperable. The plane is based on the four-engine Boeing 707 passenger jetliner.

The (E-6B) has a battle staff area and new flight deck systems based on modern Boeing 737 airplanes. The (E-6) flew in 1987, and the first (E-6B) was accepted in December 1997. The last production (E-6B) was delivered to the Navy (USN) in late 2006.

On this contract modification, Northrop Grumman (GRU) will do the work in Salt Lake City and San Diego, and should be finished by September 2017.

For more information, contact Northrop Information Systems online at www.northropgrumman.com, or Naval Air Systems Command at www.navair.navy.mil.

February 2017: 737-800A delivery.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
USN-737-7AFC
USN-GRU-X-47B - 2011-01.jpg
USN-P 8A-2014-03
USN-P-8A POSEIDON - 2013-08

October 2017:

0 707-382B (JT3D-3B) (456-18961, /65 165342; 501-18962, /66 165343), EX-(TAP)/(BUF) (TC-18F), 2 PARTED OUT.

16 E-6B (707'S) (JT3D-3B), BEING FITTED WITH 737NG GLASS COCKPITS 2002-02.

6 +2 ORDERS (2005-02) 737-7AFC (C-40A) (CFM56-7B26) (496-29979, 165829; 569-29980, 165830; 651-30200, 165831, 2000-11) "THE CLIPPER," 2000-08, (30781, 165832, 2001-03), TO REPLACE C-9'S.

108 ORDERS 737-700IGW (MMA).

63 +62 ORDERS 737-800 P-8A POSEIDON LONG RANGE MULTI-MISSION MARITIME PATROL (ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE; ANTI-SURFACE WARFARE; INTELLIGENCE; SURVEILLANCE & RECONNAISSANCE).

1 737-8FV (CFM56-7B) (40810, 168430, 2012-03; 40811, N507DS, 2012-04; 40812, 168432, 2012-07).

1 DC-9-31 (JT8D-9A) (47547), EX-(CMI).

4 DC-9-32 (JT8D-9) (520-47431, /69; 600-47474, /70; 613-47477, /71, EX-(BMA); 735-47639, /74), EX-(JAM).

1 DC-9-32CF (JT8D-9) (200-47041, /67), EX-(NAL).

1 DC-9-32F (JT8D-9) (305-47221, /68), EX-(ALI).

6 DC-9-33RC (JT8D-9) (480-47410, /69, EX-(MTH); 569-47476, /70, EX-(KLM); 669-47428, /72, EX-(IBE); 671-47545, /72.

17 DC-9-C9B (JT8D-9) (686-47577, /73).

Management:
(definitions)

JEFFREY COX, CONTACTING OFFICER TECHNICAL REPRESENTATIVE (COTR).

JAMES DODD, BOEING VP & GENERAL MANAGER MOBILITY, SURVEILLANCE & ENGAGEMENT.

RICK HEERDT, BOEING VP & P-8 PROGRAM MANAGER.

 
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