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Airlines

Name: YEMENIA YEMEN AIRWAYS
7JetSet7 Code: YEM
Status: Operational
Region: MIDDLE EAST
City: SANA'A
Country: YEMEN ARAB REPUBLIC
Employees 4017
Web: yemenia.com.
Email: info@yemenia.com
Telephone: +967 (1) 232 389
Fax: +967 (1) 252 991
Sita: SAHCZIY
Background
(definitions)

Click below for data links:
YEM-2004-11
YEM-2005-11-A
YEM-2009-11-SAFETY
YEM-2009-12 A320 ORDER
YEM-2009-12 SANAA YEMEN
YEM-2011-01-A
YEM-2011-01-B
YEM-2011-01-C
YEM-2011-01-D
YEM-2011-01-E
YEM-2011-01-F
YEM-HANGAR
YEM-LOGO

FORMED IN 1961 AND STARTED OPERATIONS IN 1963. A K A YEMEN AIRWAYS. DOMESTIC, REGIONAL & INTERNATIONAL, SCHEDULED & CHARTER, PASSENGER & CARGO, JET AIRPLANE SERVICES.

ADDRESS:
AL-HASABA, PO BOX 1183
AIRPORT ROAD
SANA'A, YEMEN

YEMEN (REPUBLIC OF YEMEN): POPULATION: 18.6 MILLION. ONCE DIVIDED BETWEEN A TRADITIONAL NORTH AND A MARXIST SOUTH, YEMEN UNITED IN 1990. 4 YEARS LATER, IT PLUNGED INTO A CIVIL WAR. FROM ITS ANCIENT (AND PRESENT) CAPITAL CITY AT SANA'A, THE NORTH PREVAILED. PER CAPITA INCOME ($820) IS THE REGION'S LOWEST, AND THE DEVELOPMENT HAS BEEN THWARTED BY YEMEN'S RECENT PAST, FRAUGHT WITH KIDNAPPINGS, ATTACKS ON OIL PIPELINES, AND POPULAR SYMPATHY FOR OSAMA BIN LADEN, WHOSE CLAN HAILS FROM SOUTHERN YEMEN. YEMEN WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1918, IT COVERS AN AREA OF 527,968 SQ KM, AND ITS OFFICIAL LANGUAGE IS ARABIC.

APRIL 1995: SAUDI ARABIAN (SVA) OWNS 49%, & THE GOVERNMENT OWNS 51%.

2,687 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 121 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 361 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

1 A310-200 (JT9D-7R4E1) DELIVERY.

JULY 1995: TO DHAKA & BANGKOK (A310-200).

JANUARY 1996: 2/2 ORDERS (MARCH 1997) A310-300'S (PW4156), 191 PAX, 2 CLASS.

MAY 1996: MERGER WITH ALYEMDA (ALY) COMPLETE, NOW CALLED YEMENIA (YEM). STILL 49% SAUDI ARABIAN (SVA) OWNED.

SANA'A WILL DO 727 & A300 MAINTENANCE, & ADEN WILL DO 737 AND DASH -7'S.

JULY 1996: HASSO ABDO SOHBI, CHAIRMAN; HANI AREF, MANAGING DIRECTOR (SAUDI (SVA) REPRESENTATIVE); AHMED H AL-HADDAD, DIRECTOR TECHNICAL (SANA'A); AND MAHER AGHBARI, DIRECTOR TECHNICAL (ADEN).

MARCH 1997: 2 A310-300'S DELIVERIES (PW4156).

APRIL 1997: 4,017 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 212 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 552 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

JUNE 1997: POSSIBLE INTEREST IN 5 737-200'S, EX-SAUDI ARABIAN (SVA). YEMENIA (YEM) IS OFFERING 2 OF CURRENT 3 737-200'S FOR SALE/LEASE. MAY BE LOOKING AT CARGO CONVERSION.

PILOTS 5 DAY STRIKE.

JULY 1997: SERIOUS CASH FLOW PROBLEMS, WITH $1.4 MILLION/MONTH TO AIRBUS (EDS) FOR 2 A310-300'S LEASED.

APRIL 1998: TAEZ - DJIBOUTI.

4,017 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 212 FLIGHT CREW (FC) & 552 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

HASSAN AL-HUTHI, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR REPLACES AHMED AL-HADDAD.

3 737-200'S AND 4 DASH 7'S FOR SALE. PLANS TO REPLACE 727 VIP WITH A WIDE BODY AIRPLANE.

MAY 1998: RAISED DOMESTIC TICKET PRICES 50% AND INTERNATIONAL TARIFF BY 30%.

MARCH 1999: 2 OF YEMENIA (YEM)'S 737-200'S ARE QUICK CHANGE (QC)'S COMBIS AND NEW INTEREST IN COMBI OR FULL CARGO CONFIGURATIONS. DOES 727 "C" CHECKS IN-HOUSE.

APRIL 1999: 4,017 EMPLOYEES.

SITA: SAHCZIY. SAHCAIY. SAHBZIY.

JULY 1999: 737-2R4C (23129, 70-ACQ), WET-LEASED TO ROYAL JORDANIAN AIRLINES (RJA).

AUGUST 1999: AGREES TO WET-LEASE 1 737-200C TO AIR DJIBOUTI (DJB).

SEPTEMBER 1999: AFTER YEARS OF OUTSOURCING ITS 727 & 737-200 "C" CHECKS TO REPAIR STATIONS, YEMENIA (YEM) IS NOW UNDERTAKING WORK IN-HOUSE AND OFFERS 3RD PARTY CONTRACTS TO OTHER AIRLINES.

1 A310-300 (PW4152) (535), EX-PASSAREDO (PDO), (ILF) 5 YEAR LEASED.

NOVEMBER 1999: PLANS SERVICE TO JOHANNESBURG.

FORMS YEMENIA (YEM) CARGO TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF NEW DUTY-FREE ZONE, CREATED IN ADEN. PLANS TO CONVERT 2 727-200'S TO FREIGHTER, & LOOKING FOR OUTSIDE INVESTOR TO SHARE COST OF IMPENDING "D" CHECKS & FREIGHTER CONVERSION.

APRIL 2000: 4,017 EMPLOYEES (INCLUDING 212 FLIGHT CREW (FC), & 552 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANS (MT)).

MAY 2000: (http://www.yemenia.com.ye). (services@yemenia.com.ye).

1 A310-324 (PW4152) (568), AIRBUS 5 YEAR LEASED.

JUNE 2000: INCDT: (YEM) 737-2R4C (1034-23129) RAN OFF THE RUNWAY AT KHARTOUM. THE AIRPLANE WAS WRITTEN OFF (W/O).

JULY 2000: COMPLETES 1ST 727-200 (21846) "D" CHECK AT SANA'A (USED TO GO TO ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES (ETH).

NOVEMBER 2000: 1 747SP-27 (413-21786, /79 A7-YMN), EX-QATAR AIRWAYS (QTA), VIP CONFIGURATION.

JANUARY 2001: ABDULLA AL-HUDAID, DIRECTOR TECHNICAL SERVICES, REPLACES MOHHAMED AL-ARRASHA.

TO DUBAI - KUALA LUMPUR - JAKARTA (2/WEEK).

MAY 2001: 3 ORDERS (APRIL 2002) 737-800'S, (ILF) LEASED, 189 PAX.

JULY 2001: INCDT: (YEM) 727-200 LANDING AT ASMARA AIRPORT WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND HIT A CONCRETE BLOCK = NO INJURIES, BUT SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGE TO LEFT MAIN LANDING GEAR AND WINGS.

APRIL 2002: MAIN BASE: SANA'A (SAH).

HUB: ADEN AIRPORT (ADE).

OWNERS: GOVERNMENT OF YEMEN (51%); GOVERNMENT OF SAUDI ARABIA (49%).

MAY 2002: 1ST 737-8Q8 DELIVERY, (ILF) LEASED (1129-30645, 70-ADL).

June 2002: Adds new routes to Malaysia and Indonesia.

July 2002: 2nd 737-8Q8 (YC-177) delivery. 2 orders (December 2002) A330-200'S, (ILF) leased.

September 2002: Selects Boeing (TBC) & Air France Industries (AFA) for a joint component services support program for its 737-800's.

3rd 737-8Q8 (30661, 70-ADN) delivery.

October 2002: $160 million for construction of a new, Sana'a International airport, with a new terminal building, parking for 600 cars, and a 1.8 mile access road.

November 2002: Possible assistance to Air Djibouti (DJB), by providing 727-200 airplanes.

January 2003: "C10" check maintenance contract to Sabena Technics (SAB) for Yemenia (YEM) A310 at Sana'a airport.

Contract with Mercator, Emirates (EAD) Group's Information Technology (IT) division, for Fastrac, the revenue accounting solution for small and medium-sized businesses.

April 2003: 4,017 employees.

July 2003: Resumes Sana'a - Kuwait (2/week) (after a 13-year hiatus).

April 2004: Resumes Sana'a - Johannesburg (2/week).

October 2004: Code share with Qatar (QTA), Doha - Sana'a & Sana'a - Aden - Doha.

A330-243 (625, 70-ADP "Sana'a"), (ILF) leased.

November 2004: A330-243 (632, 70-ADT "Aden"), (ILF) leased.

June 2005: 737-2R4C (23130) sold to Jordan Aviation (JOR).

July 2005: Multimillion-dollar long-term agreement with Mercator under which Mercator will supply a wide range of Information Technology (IT) solutions to Yemenia (YEM).

September 2005: Talks with Boeing (TBC) regarding possible 6/4 orders 787 Dreamliners.

December 2005: Yemenia (YEM) confirmed that it is in initial talks with Airbus (EDS) and Boeing (TBC) to acquire up to 10 mid-size wide body airplanes for delivery by 2012. It is expected that the order will be six firm airplanes and four options. The carrier plans to simplify its fleet down to two airplane types. (YEM) currently operates two A330-200s, four A310-300s and three 737-800s.

March 2006: Six Arab carriers signed an agreement in late January to form Arabesk Group, a consortium "designed to help members realize better commercial potential," according to Arab Air Carriers Organization Secretary General, Abdul Wahab Teffaha. Initial members are EgyptAir (EGP), Gulf Air (GUL), Middle East Airlines (MEA), Royal Jordanian (RJA), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SVA), and Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM). The group said Tunisair (TUN) likely will join soon. Formation of the entity was discussed last summer. "The cooperation is already yielding benefits for the individual carriers and is demonstrating that this is a good path for the future, as well as providing value-added service to travelers through better market coverage," Teffaha said. The airlines will cooperate on scheduling, operate code share flights and have special prorate agreements during the summer schedule period. Sabre Airlines Solutions consulted on the formation of Arabesk.

Sabre Travel Network signed a multiyear, full-content agreement with SN Brussels Airlines (DAT). Meanwhile, four additional airlines upgraded their connections to Sabre: Aegean Airlines (CRM), Helios Airways (HCY), Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM), and Afriqiyah Airways (AQY) now are participating at Direct Connect Availability, the "highest level of participation in the Sabre GDS," according to the company.

(YEM) signed a preliminary agreement to purchase six A350-800s, with options for an additional four, Airbus announced. No engine was selected for the airplane, which will seat 18 in first class (F) and 265 in economy (Y) and begin delivering in 2012. (YEM) currently operates four A310s and two A330-200s in its long-haul fleet.

"We are looking forward to introducing the airplane on the intercontinental routes to and from Yemen," Chairman Abdulkhaled Al-Kadi said. "(YEM) is on the right track to implement its fleet modernization program and is preparing for growth. Recent business trends are remarkably [good]. (YEM) is expecting a double-digit growth annually. This is why there is a need to focus on fleet, human resources training, automation and networking."

Airbus (EDS) said it has received 182 orders and commitments for the A350 from 14 customers.

July 2006: As flag carrier of Yemen, Yemenia (YEM) operates scheduled domestic services, as well as international services to more than 30 destinations in Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and the USA.

(IATA) Code: IY - 635. (ICAO) Code: IYE (Callsign - YEMENI).

Parent organization/shareholders: Government of Yemen (51%); & government of Saudi Arabia (49%).

Alliances: Daallo Airlines (DAO); Merpati Nusantara (PNM); & Qatar Airways (QTA).

Main Base: Sana'a airport (SAH).

SITA Code: SAHCZIY. SAHCAIY. SAHZIY.

Hub: Aden airport (ADE).

Domestic, Scheduled Destinations: Aden; Al Ghaydah; Hodeidah; Riyan Sana'a; Seiyun; Socotra; & Taiz.

International, Scheduled Destinations: Abu Dhabi; Addis Ababa; Amman; Asmara; Bahrain; Beirut; Cairo; Damascus; Dar Es Salaam; Dhaka; Djibouti; Doha; Dubai; Frankfurt; Jakarta; Jeddah; Johannesurg; Khartoum; Kuala Lumpur; Kuwait; London; Marseilles; Moroni; Mumbai; Paris; Riyadh; & Rome.

August 2006: Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM) secured European Aviation Safety Agency Part 145 certification for services provided by its Maintenance & Engineering division. The airline will offer heavy Maintenace Repair & Overhaul (MRO) and checks on A330-200s, A310-300s, 737-200s, 737-800s and 727-200s in its own fleet, as well for third parties.

July 2007: Galileo said Saudi Arabian Airlines (SVA), Air-India (AIN), and Yemenia (YEM) implemented e-ticketing via the Global Distribution System (GDS).

October 2007: 737-8Q8 (30730, 70-ADQ), (ILF) leased.

November 2007: Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM) firmed up its commitment to the A350 XWB, signing a contract for 10 A350 XWB-800s. It is the midst of a modernization program and operates a long-haul fleet comprising four A310s and two A330-200s. It initially chose the Airbus (EDS) offering eight months ago, when an initial delivery date of 2012 was announced. That date was not confirmed. (YEM)'s A350s will be configured with 18 first class (F) seats and 265 (Y) in economy. Chairman, Abdulkhaled Al-Kadi said the airline "is on the right track to implement its fleet modernization program, and to be well positioned to grow to meet high passenger demand."

January 2008: Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM) signed an agreement with Djibouti Airlines (DJB) to help the African carrier renovate its eight airplanes and upgrade its operation, the Yemeni government news agency reported. Djibouti Airlines (DJB) reportedly has secured financing from "a number of foreign investors," and would receive $12 million in a first phase.

Yemenia Airways (YEM) and the Jeddah-based Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector announced that Felix Airways (FXX), also known as (A K A) Al-Saeeda Airways, has been established with a launch capital of $80 million. Services were launched with a flight between Sana'a and Aden. Felix Airways (FXX) is managed by minority shareholder and national flag carrier, Yemenia (YEM). (FXX) will replace (YEM) in operating all domestic routes.

March 2008: SITA reached agreement with Yemen Airways (YEM) to provide its online booking SITA E-Commerce Platform. Technology will launch in August and is expected to cut fees by bypassing global distribution systems (GDS)s.

June 2008: Amadeus reached 10-year agreements with 12 Arab Air Carriers Org-affiliated airlines for distribution activities in their home markets. Six members, who have partnered with Amadeus for the past seven years, will be joined by another six, when their current distribution agreements expire at year end. Accounting for 66% of the reservations made by travel agencies in the (MENA) region, the 12 airlines are Air Algerie (ALG), Afriqiyah Airways (AQY), EgyptAir (EGP), Etihad Airways (EHD), Kuwait Airways (KUW), Libyan Airlines (LAA), Qatar Airways (QTA), Saudi Arabian Airlines (SVA), Sudan Airways (SUD), Syrian Arab Airlines (SYR), Tunisair (TUN), and Yemen Airways (YEM).

(YEM) successfully renewed its (IATA) (ITA) Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) registration.

July 2008: The eighth edition of the European Commission (EC)'s blacklist of banned airlines does not include Iran's Mahan Airlines (MHN), thanks to "significant efforts and progress accomplished by this carrier, which were verified during an on-site inspection," but continues to include Indonesian airlines, including Garuda Indonesia (GIA). "The Commission (EC) decided that the Indonesian authorities have still not developed and implemented an efficient oversight program on any of the carriers under their regulatory control," it said. Ukraine Cargo Airways remains banned as well, and Yemenia Airways (YEM) was told it "should complete its corrective actions plan" by the Air Safety Committee's next meeting. All airlines from Equatorial Guinea, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are banned, while Gabon Airlines and Afrijet (FRJ) from Gabon are allowed to maintain operations at their current level.

August 2008: Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM) reached a 10-year, $90 million fleet management agreement with Pratt & Whitney (P&W) Global Service Partners. The deal covers (YEM)'s three (PW4000)-powered A310-300s.

January 2009: Ramco reached agreement with Yemen Airways (YEM) for its Maintenance & Engineering (M&E) software to support maintenance activities.

June 2009: ACCDT: Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM) A310-324 (PW4152) (535, /90 70-ADJ), with 11 (FC) - (CA)/142 passengers on board crashed in the Indian Ocean. Flight IY626 was on its way from Sana'a and was due to land at Moroni, the Comoros Islands capital. (YEM) operates four A310-300s, as well as two A330-200s and four 737-800s.

The (YEM) A310-324 crashed as it attempted to land amid severe turbulence and howling winds. Officials said a teenage girl was plucked from the sea, the only known survivor. The crash in waters off this island nation came two years after French aviation regulatory officials reported equipment faults with this particular plane and it was specifically barred from operating to France owing to safety concerns. This aging A310-324 was flying the last leg of a (YEM) flight from Paris and Marseille to Comoros, with a stop in Sana'a to change planes. Most of the passengers were from Comoros, a former French colony. Sixty-six on board were French nationals.

Khaled el-Kaei, the head of (YEM)'s public relations office, said a 14-year-old girl survived the crash, and Yemen's embassy in Washington issued a statement saying a young girl was taken to a hospital. It also said five bodies were recovered. Sgt Said Abdilai told "Europe 1" radio that he rescued the girl after she was found bobbing in the water. She couldn't grasp the life ring rescuers threw to her, so he jumped into the sea, Abdilai said. He said rescuers gave the trembling girl warm water with sugar. There were earlier statements from officials that a 5-year-old boy survived. El-Kaei said that was not known and (YEM) had lost contact with its office in Comoros because of bad weather.

Yemeni Civil Aviation Deputy Chief, Mohammed Abdul Qader said the flight data recorder (FDR) had not been found and it was too early to speculate on the cause of the crash. But he said winds in excess of 40 miles per hour were pummeling the plane as it was landing in darkness in the early morning hours. Turbulence was believed to be a factor in the crash, Yemen's embassy in Washington said. "The weather was very bad," Qader said, adding the windy conditions were hampering rescue efforts.

The (YEM) plane was the second Airbus (EDS) airplane to crash into the sea this month. An Air France (AFA) A330-200 crashed into the Atlantic Ocean on June 1, killing all 228 people on board, as it flew from Rio de Janeiro to Paris.

Mohammed Moqbel, a (YEM) pilot (FC) who has flown to the Comoros, said the route can be difficult because of the geography and weather.
"The airport is also very poor in terms of equipment," said Moqbel. "They don't have advanced radars to guide planes."

The tragedy — and dwindling hopes that anyone else made it out alive — prompted an outcry in the Comoros, where residents complained of a lack of seat belts on (YEM) flights and planes so overcrowded that passengers had to stand in the aisles. The Comoros, a former French colony of 700,000 people, is an archipelago of three main islands situated 1,800 miles south of Yemen, between Africa's southeastern coast and the island of Madagascar.

General Bruno de Bourdoncle de Saint-Salvy, the Senior Commander for French forces in the southern Indian Ocean, said the A310 crashed in deep waters about nine miles north of the Comoran coast and 21 miles from the Moroni airport. Searchers encountered an oil slick at the site, the Yemeni Embassy statement said. French aviation inspectors found a "number of faults" in the plane's equipment during a 2007 inspection, French Transport Minister Dominique Bussereau said on France's "i-Tele" television. He did not elaborate.

In Brussels, European Union (EU) Transport Commissioner, Antonio Tajani said the airline had previously met (EU) safety checks and was not on their blacklist. But he said a full investigation was being launched amid questions about why the passengers — who originated in Paris — were transferred on another jet in the Yemeni capital of Sana'a.

An Airbus (EDS) statement said the plane that crashed went into service 19 years ago, and had accumulated 51,900 flight hours. (EDS) said it was sending a team of specialists to the Comoros.

The A310-300 is a twin-engine wide body jet that can seat up to 220 passengers. There are 214 A310s in service worldwide, with 41 operators.

A crisis center was set up at Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris. Many passengers were from the French city of Marseille, home to around 80,000 immigrant Comorans, even more than Comoros' capital of Moroni.

(YEM) has long been a target of criticism for the poor condition of its passenger cabins, with recent passenger complaints about missing or faulty seat belts. Still, analysts have cautioned against equating the condition of the passenger cabin on any airline with the airplane's maintenance records. (YEM) has a solid safety record. In 2008 it passed the International Airline Transport Association (IATA) (ITA)'s Operational Safety Audit (IOSA), a rigorous set of inspections, considered an indication of high quality for any airline.

One problem that does crop up with older airplanes, particularly when a certain model has been discontinued, is the issue of fake replacement parts, experts said. Airline companies sometimes unwittingly purchase fake parts, which are then put into airplanes by their maintenance crews. Despite rigorous international efforts to root out counterfeit spares in the past decade, they are still believed to be in circulation. "Pirate spare parts remain a big maintenance problem in aviation," said Captain Harry Eggerschwiler, Chief of Operations for the African Civil Aviation Authority. "This is true everywhere in the world and not just in (developing) countries."

Some French Comorans insisted their complaints about (YEM)'s safety weren't heeded by authorities. Zalifa Youssouf, a member of "SOS Voyages," which seeks to improve passenger conditions and safety, told France's "i-Tele" television that the Comoran community had complained about the flight from San'a to Comoros. She said the planes were dirty, frequently did not have safety belts and that flight attendants (CA) often did not speak French, just Arabic which passengers did not understand. "We felt we were in danger," Youssouf said. Mohamed Ali, a Comoran who went to (YEM)'s headquarters in Paris to try to get more information about the doomed flight, said complaints about safety went unheeded. "Some people stand the whole way to Moroni," he said.

(YEM) said it is suspending its Comoros service indefinitely, according to press reports.

(YEM) officials said the 11-member crew was made up of six Yemenis, including the pilot (FC), two Moroccans, an Indonesian, an Ethiopian and a Filipino.

July 2009: The debate over Yemenia (YEM)'s safety standards raged as the European Commission (EC) sent a letter to (YEM) threatening to ban its airplanes from European Union (EU) airspace. France has said that the crashed A310 was specifically banned from its airspace following a 2007 inspection that found "faults," but (YEM) continued to operate to the (EU) and the A310 was allowed to fly to other (EU) nations. In the letter, the (EC) stated that it is seeking "an update on the implementation of the corrective actions undertaken . . . in the area of maintenance and operations." It added that an (EC) meeting would determine "if the imposition of an operating ban on Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM) applicable in all (EC) member states is justified."

At a news conference, (YEM) Chairman, Abdulkalek Saleh Al Kadi said, "The airplane that crashed was in full readiness and had no technical fault at all . . . We are a company that applies international standards . . . The crash has nothing to do with maintenance." He added that (YEM) has made a "preliminary decision" to give each victim's family €20,000/$28,170.

(YEM) threatened to "reconsider" its order for 10 A350-800s valued at $2 billion because it believes Airbus (EDS) has been un-supportive following last month's A310-300 crash in the Indian Ocean that killed 152. In interviews with multiple media outlets, (YEM) Chairman, Abdulkhalek Saleh Al Kadi complained that the French government "rushed" to blame the airline's maintenance program for the accident and faulted (EDS) for not backing (YEM). "We are not receiving cooperation from (EDS) and some of the French people are really against us," he said. Speaking to "Agence France Press," he stated, "If the French position remains harsh and if the pressure on (YEM) continues . . . we will be forced to reconsider the [A350] deal . . . The French side is wronging (YEM)." He told "Reuters" that (EDS) failed to show "moral and media support" in the crash's aftermath, adding, "(YEM) expects support from the manufacturer because [the airline's] history over more than >40 years manifests its competence."

(EDS) responded by noting that it must adhere to "strict guidelines" regarding public comments to media following accidents. (YEM) firmed its A350 order at the 2007 Dubai Air Show. (YEM) had said it planned to use the planes on "intercontinental routes to and from Yemen." Its ability to operate such routes would be compromised if it is placed on the European Union (EU)'s list of banned carriers, a move that is under consideration.

Later, Iran's Mahan Air (MHN) was added to the (EU)'s list of banned airlines, while Garuda Indonesia (GIA), Airfast Indonesia (PTF), Mandala Airlines (MND) and Premiair were removed from the "blacklist." The latest update did not include Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM), despite recent controversy following the June 29 A310-300 crash that killed 152 passengers and crew. All airlines from Zambia and Kazakhstan were added to the list with the exception of Air Astana (AKZ), which will be allowed limited access to (EU) nations.

TAAG Angola Airlines (ANG), already on the list of more than >200 carriers, will be allowed to operate "into Portugal only with certain airplanes and under very strict conditions," the European Commission (EC) said, adding that the limited access was granted to acknowledge "progress made by the civil aviation authority of Angola [and TAAG (ANG)] to resolve progressively any safety deficiencies." All other Angolan airlines remain banned. All Indonesian carriers remain banned apart from the aforementioned four. Complete bans are in place on airlines from Benin, Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kyrgyzstan, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Swaziland.

European Commission VP Transport, Antonio Tajani has called for a global blacklist, a suggestion that has been rejected by (ICAO) for now. "We will not accept that airlines fly at different standards when they operate inside and outside Europe," he said, renewing his call. "It is high time that the international community rethinks its safety policy; those airlines which are unsafe should not be allowed to fly anywhere."

November 2009: Arab carriers are standing behind Yemenia (YEM) over an escalating diplomatic conflict with France in the wake of the fatal (YEM) A310 crash last June - - SEE ATTACHED "FLIGHT INTERNATIONAL" ARTICLE - - "YEM-SAFETY-2009-11."

(YEM) is to suspend its Paris service and is also temporarily halting some other European routes.

Memo of Understanding for 10 orders A320s for use within the Middle East as well as to Africa, Europe and India. Yemen is one airline market in the Arabian Gulf that hasn't taken off, being depressed by extremely low average incomes, lack of energy resources and political instability that has gotten worse in recent months.

January 2010: The UK revealed a further set of measures to enhance aviation security, including introduction of a "no-fly" list, suspension of Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM)'s direct flights "pending enhanced security" and its intention to "promote enhancements to the international aviation security regime, including stronger security arrangements in airports and greater sharing of information" with (ICAO), the European Union (EU) and G8 nations.

(YEM) firmed its order for 10 A320 family airplanes announced at the Dubai Airshow, Airbus (EDS) said. No engine choice was announced.

June 2010: Has launched flights from Sana'a to Guangzhou via Dubai. Also plans new African services to Dae es Salaam, Lagos, and Nairobi, as well as European service to Amsterdam and Stockholm.

July 2010: Yemen Airways (YEM) ordered the (V2500) "Select One" to power 10 A320s with deliveries beginning in 2011. (IAE) noted that this is the first time (YEM) has chosen the (V2500) for the A320. "Fundamental to (YEM)’s decision was the engine’s superior performance and reliability in arduous hot and high conditions," (IAE) said. Including a long-term "Aftermarket Services" agreement, the deal is worth $200 million.

August 2010: Yemen Airways (YEM) will launch thrice-weekly, Sana’a - Nairobi and Sana’a - Dar es Salaam services on December 6 aboard a 737-800.

January 2011: On the regulatory front, the (UAE) signed a new aviation bilateral with Yemen, a Gulf country far poorer and less politically stable than most of its oil-rich neighbors. The new accord will allow more flights in markets like Dubai - Sana'a.

May 2011: Yemen Airways (YEM) took delivery of an A320-232 (4653), its first of an order for 10 A320 family airplanes placed in January 2010 - - SEE PHOTO - - "YEM-A320-1ST-2011-05."

A320-232 (4690, 70-AFB), delivery, ex-(F-WWBO).

July 2011: Yemenia Yemen Airways (YEM) has reduced its Sana’a (SAH) - Dubai services from five-times-weekly to thrice-weekly, and has reduced its Nairobi service to weekly, owing to political unrest in Yemen. Twice-weekly, (SAH) – Frankfurt A330-200 service will be replaced with an A320, and Cairo will be used as a technical stop. (SAH) – Paris Charles de Gaulle service will use an A320 from September 8.

March 2012: AirFrance Industries (AFI)/(KLM) (E&M) has extended a component support contract with Yemenia Airways (YEM), originally signed in 2005. The renewed contract operates under the same terms, covering component support with pool access and repairs for two A330s.

December 2013: Yemenia (YEM), the national carrier of Yemen, expanded its international network on December 14th, with a new service from Sana’a (SAH) to Rome Fiumicino (FCO). (YEM)’s 19th route from its main base, will be served weekly (Tuesdays), utilizing its 150-seat A320s. The 4,231 km sector to Italy’s largest airport faces no direct competition from other carriers.

April 2014: News Item A-1: On March 31, Yemen national carrier Yemenia (YEM), said it was temporarily suspending flight operations until April 30 “due to the prevalent unfavorable operational situation and restriction imposed on Yemen airspace.”

News Item A-2: Yemenia (YEM) has suspended operations with immediate effect an announcement on its website has said. The move comes in the wake of continued Royal Saudi Air Force-led airstrikes against Iranian-backed Houthi forces entrenched near Sana International Airport.

The attacks are understood to have partially damaged parts of the airport's main terminal, as well as part of its primary runway 18/36. No reliable information concerning the condition of Yemenia (YEM)'s fleet or that of Felix Airways ((IATA) Code: FO, based at Sana'a) and Blue Bird Aviation (Yemen) ((ICAO) Code: BBY, based at Sana'a) is currently known.

Saudi military spokesmen last week told the international media that the kingdom's ongoing campaign, codenamed "Operation Decisive Storm," has finished targeting Houthi air capability and is now focused on destroying Yemeni Scud missiles confiscated by Houthi forces and which have now been aimed at Saudi Arabia.

Despite the attacks, airspace in southern Saudi Arabia has partially reopened to commercial traffic with five airports, including Jazan and Wadi ad Dawasir now taking domestic and international flights.

Meanwhile, following an intense battle on Saturday, forces loyal to ousted President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi retook Aden airport from Houthi militia. The airport, however, remains closed to commercial traffic.

As the country continues its descent into chaos, Yemen's civil aviation authority closed its airspace to international traffic. Airlines serving the Gulf region (Emirates (EAD), Etihad Airways (EHD), and Qatar Airways (QTA)l) in particular) have therefore had to revise flight paths resulting in delays of one to two hours.

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has flagged warnings from both France and the USA, banning their carriers from Yemeni airspace due to safety concerns.

August 2015: The airport serving the southern Yemeni port city of Aden has resumed commercial operations following a four-month long closure. The airfield was recently recaptured by forces loyal to ousted President Abdu Rabu Mansour Hadi with the backing of a Saudi-led Arab coalition.

"Reuters" reported the first commercial flight to touch down was a Yemenia ((IATA) Code: IY, based at Sanaa) (YEM) service ferrying locals back from Djibouti on August 5.

During its occupation by Iranian-backed Houthi insurgents, the airfield was subject to intense bombardment by coalition forces resulting in severe damage to the passenger terminal, runway and control tower.

Fleet:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
YEM-737-8Q8-L
YEM-737-8Q8
YEM-747SP-27
YEM-747SP
YEM-737-800
YEM-A310
YEM-A310-300
YEM-A320-1ST-2011-05
YEM-A330
YEM-A330-200
YEM-A330-200 - 2015-08.jpg
YEM-A350

April 2016:

1 707-320C (FOR SALE).

3 727-2N8 (JT8D-17R) (1512-21842, /79 7O-ADA, (VIP); 1518-21844, /79 7O-ACV; 1529-21845, /79; 1549-21846, /79 7O-ADX; 1557-21847, /79 7O-ADY), FOR SALE. 21845 SOLD. 21846; ST (JOR) 2005-04. 21842; VIP GOVT OPS. 12F, 142Y.

1 737-2N8 (JT8D-15) (478-21296, /76 7O-ACU), FOR SALE, 118Y.

0 737-2R4C (JT8D-17R) (1034-23129, /84 7O-ACQ; 1040-23130, /84 7O-ACR), EX-(ALY), 1 WET-LST (RJA) 1999-07, 23129 WRITTEN OFF 2000-06. 23130 ST (JOR) 2005-06. 118Y/FREIGHTER.

4 737-8Q8 (CFM56-7B26) (1195-28252, 7O-ADM; 1129-30645, 5/02 7O-ADL; 1186-30661, 7O-ADN; 2399-30730, 7O-ADQ, 2007-10), (ILF) LSD. 12F, 142Y.

1 747SP-27 (JT9D-7J) (413-21786, /80 7O-YMN), EX-(QTA), (VIP) GOVT OPS.

6/4 ORDERS 787 DREAMLINER:

2 A310-222 (JT9D-7R4E1), LSD, 194 PAX.

0 A310-324 (PW4152) (535, /90 7O-ADJ - - W/O CRASHED - - SEE "ACCDT - - 2009-06"), EX-(PDO), (ILF) LSD 1999-09. 18F, 196Y.

1 A310-324 (PW4152) (568, /91 F-OGYO), EX-(AUL), (AFIS) 5 YR LSD 2000-05. 18F, 195Y.

2 + 2 OPTS A310-325 (PW4156A) (702, /97 F-OHPR; 704, /97 F-OHPS), (AIFS) LSD. 12F, 21C, 157Y.

3 +7 ORDERS A320-232 (V2500) (4639, 70-AFA "MUKALLA;" 4653, 2011-05 - - SEE PHOTO - - "YEM-A320-1ST-2011-05;" 4690, 70-AFB "MAREB" 2011-05).

2 A330-243 (TRENT 772B-60) (625, /04 7O-ADP "SANA'A," 2004-10; 632, 7O-ADT "ADEN"), (ILF) 8 YR LEASED. 18F, 259Y.

6/4 ORDERS (2012-?) A350 XWB-800, 18F, 265Y:

3 DHC-6-300 TWIN OTTERS (PT6A-27) (664, /80 7O-ADI; 764, /81 7O-ADH), 19Y.

0 DHC-7-102 (PT6A-50) (032, /80 7O-ACZ; 035, /80 7O-ACB), 49Y. 032 TO (AKN) 2002-02. 035 ST ASIAN SPIRIT 200303.

2 DHC-7-103 (PT6A-50) (023, /80 7O-ACL; 031, /80 7O-ACM), 40Y.

1 DHC-8-102 (327, 7O-ADU), EX-PIEDMONT AIRLINES 2006-02.

2 LOCKHEED C-130H HERCULES (T56-A-15) (4825, /79 7O-ADE; 4827, /79 7O-ADD), FREIGHTER.

2 AN-26.

1 IL-76TD (D-30KP-2) (1033418578, /93 RA-76365), FREIGHTER.

Management:
(definitions)

Click below for photos:
YEM-CHMN

CAPTAIN ABDULKHALEK SALEH AL-KADI, CHAIRMAN (1999-07).

H E AHMED AL ELWANI, CHAIRMAN YEMENIA AIRLINE.

HANY AREF, MANAGING DIRECTOR & GENERAL MANAGER, EX-(SVA) (1996-07).

ALI SUMAIRI, DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR.

CAPTAIN MOHAMMED AL-SUMAIRI, DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER, FLIGHT OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE (SAHOZIY).

AMIN ALHAIMY, DEPUTY GENERAL MANAGER COMMERCIAL AFFAIRS.

ABDULWAHAB NOAMAN, FLIGHT OPERATIONS DIRECTOR.

AHMED AL HADDAD, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR.

ABDULLA AL-HUDAID, MAINTENANCE & ENGINEERING DIRECTOR (hudaid@y.net.ye), (SAHOZIY) (2001-01).

MOHAMMED AL-JADABI, DIRECTOR (ADEN) TECHNICAL SERVICES.

ABDULLA AL-KEBSI, COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR.

ABDULWAHAB GHOBER, CORPORATE PLANNING DIRECTOR.

SAEED BAZARA, FINANCE DIRECTOR.

MANSOUR MOH'D ASSAD, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE.

HASSAN ZOKARI, MANAGER TECHNICAL SERVICES (ADEN) (ADEMZIY) (1999-07).

HAEL SAIF AL-MOHAIR, MANAGER PRODUCTION PLANNING & CONTROL.

ABDULLAH AL-GINDARI, MANAGER TECHNICAL CONTRACTS.

ADEL Y AL-ASWADI, CHIEF INSPECTOR.

HAMZA S AMBER, ADVISOR - DIRECTOR TECHNICAL.

KHALED EL-KAEI, HEAD PUBLIC RELATIONS (PR).

MOH'D ZAID MAHDAR, SUPERVISOR ENGINEERING.

 
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